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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 8.83-8.88
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κὰκ κεφαλῆς εἴρυσσε, κάλυψε δὲ καλὰ πρόσωπα·pulled it over his head, and hid his handsome face, for he was ashamed to shed tears from under his eyebrows in front of the Phaeacians. Indeed, each time the divine singer stopped singing, Odysseus took the cloak from his head, wiped his tears, grasped a goblet with two handles, and made libation to the gods.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 11.632 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

11.632. /a basket of bronze, and therewith an onion, a relish for their drink, and pale honey, and ground meal of sacred barley; and beside them a beauteous cup, that the old man had brought from home, studded with bosses of gold; four were the handles thereof, and about each
2. Homer, Odyssey, 1.337-1.344, 8.75, 8.84-8.92, 8.502, 8.517, 8.521-8.531, 11.333-11.334, 11.367-11.369, 13.1-13.2 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Euripides, Hippolytus, 244-245, 243 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 966, 965 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

117c. but I may and must pray to the gods that my departure hence be a fortunate one; so I offer this prayer, and may it be granted. With these words he raised the cup to his lips and very cheerfully and quietly drained it. Up to that time most of us had been able to restrain our tears fairly well, but when we watched him drinking and saw that he had drunk the poison, we could do so no longer, but in spite of myself my tears rolled down in floods, so that I wrapped my face in my cloak and wept for myself; for it was not for him that I wept
6. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

237a. Phaedrus. Speak then. Socrates. Do you know what I’m going to do? Phaedrus. About what? Socrates. I’m going to keep my head wrapped up while I talk, that I may get through my discourse as quickly as possible and that I may not look at you and become embarrassed. Phaedrus. Only speak, and in other matters suit yourself. Socrates. Come then, O tuneful Muses, whether ye receive this name from the quality of your song or from the musical race of the Ligyans, grant me your aid in the tale this most excellent man compels me to relate
7. Aristotle, Poetics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Polybius, Histories, 6.53 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

6.53. 1.  Whenever any illustrious man dies, he is carried at his funeral into the forum to the so‑called rostra, sometimes conspicuous in an upright posture and more rarely reclined.,2.  Here with all the people standing round, a grown-up son, if he has left one who happens to be present, or if not some other relative mounts the rostra and discourses on the virtues and success­ful achievements of the dead.,3.  As a consequence the multitude and not only those who had a part in these achievements, but those also who had none, when the facts are recalled to their minds and brought before their eyes, are moved to such sympathy that the loss seems to be not confined to the mourners, but a public one affecting the whole people.,4.  Next after the interment and the performance of the usual ceremonies, they place the image of the departed in the most conspicuous position in the house, enclosed in a wooden shrine.,5.  This image is a mask reproducing with remarkable fidelity both the features and complexion of the deceased.,6.  On the occasion of public sacrifices they display these images, and decorate them with much care, and when any distinguished member of the family dies they take them to the funeral, putting them on men who seem to them to bear the closest resemblance to the original in stature and carriage.,7.  These representatives wear togas, with a purple border if the deceased was a consul or praetor, whole purple if he was a censor, and embroidered with gold if he had celebrated a triumph or achieved anything similar.,8.  They all ride in chariots preceded by the fasces, axes, and other insignia by which the different magistrates are wont to be accompanied according to the respective dignity of the offices of state held by each during his life;,9.  and when they arrive at the rostra they all seat themselves in a row on ivory chairs. There could not easily be a more ennobling spectacle for a young man who aspires to fame and virtue.,10.  For who would not be inspired by the sight of the images of men renowned for their excellence, all together and as if alive and breathing? What spectacle could be more glorious than this?
9. Asconius Pedianus Quintus, In Milonianam, 32 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 2.1-2.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Sallust, Iugurtha, 4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.202-1.206, 1.250, 1.446-1.495 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.202. till rocks and blazing torches fill the air 1.203. (rage never lacks for arms)—if haply then 1.204. ome wise man comes, whose reverend looks attest 1.205. a life to duty given, swift silence falls; 1.206. all ears are turned attentive; and he sways 1.250. the whole herd, browsing through the lowland vale 1.446. her spotted mantle was; perchance she roused 1.448. So Venus spoke, and Venus' son replied: 1.449. “No voice or vision of thy sister fair 1.450. has crossed my path, thou maid without a name! 1.451. Thy beauty seems not of terrestrial mould 1.452. nor is thy music mortal! Tell me, goddess 1.453. art thou bright Phoebus' sister? Or some nymph 1.454. the daughter of a god? Whate'er thou art 1.455. thy favor we implore, and potent aid 1.456. in our vast toil. Instruct us of what skies 1.457. or what world's end, our storm-swept lives have found! 1.458. Strange are these lands and people where we rove 1.459. compelled by wind and wave. Lo, this right hand 1.461. Then Venus: “Nay, I boast not to receive 1.462. honors divine. We Tyrian virgins oft 1.463. bear bow and quiver, and our ankles white 1.464. lace up in purple buskin. Yonder lies 1.465. the Punic power, where Tyrian masters hold 1.466. Agenor's town; but on its borders dwell 1.467. the Libyans, by battles unsubdued. 1.468. Upon the throne is Dido, exiled there 1.469. from Tyre, to flee th' unnatural enmity 1.470. of her own brother. 'T was an ancient wrong; 1.471. too Iong the dark and tangled tale would be; 1.472. I trace the larger outline of her story: 1.473. Sichreus was her spouse, whose acres broad 1.474. no Tyrian lord could match, and he was-blessed 1.475. by his ill-fated lady's fondest love 1.476. whose father gave him her first virgin bloom 1.477. in youthful marriage. But the kingly power 1.478. among the Tyrians to her brother came 1.479. Pygmalion, none deeper dyed in crime 1.480. in all that land. Betwixt these twain there rose 1.481. a deadly hatred,—and the impious wretch 1.482. blinded by greed, and reckless utterly 1.483. of his fond sister's joy, did murder foul 1.484. upon defenceless and unarmed Sichaeus 1.485. and at the very altar hewed him down. 1.486. Long did he hide the deed, and guilefully 1.487. deceived with false hopes, and empty words 1.488. her grief and stricken love. But as she slept 1.489. her husband's tombless ghost before her came 1.490. with face all wondrous pale, and he laid bare 1.491. his heart with dagger pierced, disclosing so 1.492. the blood-stained altar and the infamy 1.493. that darkened now their house. His counsel was 1.494. to fly, self-banished, from her ruined land 1.495. and for her journey's aid, he whispered where
13. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 34.80, 35.6-35.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Tacitus, Agricola, 46 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Tacitus, Annals, 1.8, 1.33 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.8.  The only business which he allowed to be discussed at the first meeting of the senate was the funeral of Augustus. The will, brought in by the Vestal Virgins, specified Tiberius and Livia as heirs, Livia to be adopted into the Julian family and the Augustan name. As legatees in the second degree he mentioned his grandchildren and great-grandchildren; in the third place, the prominent nobles — an ostentatious bid for the applause of posterity, as he detested most of them. His bequests were not above the ordinary civic scale, except that he left 43,500,000 sesterces to the nation and the populace, a thousand to every man in the praetorian guards, five hundred to each in the urban troops, and three hundred to all legionaries or members of the Roman cohorts. The question of the last honours was then debated. The two regarded as the most striking were due to Asinius Gallus and Lucius Arruntius — the former proposing that the funeral train should pass under a triumphal gateway; the latter, that the dead should be preceded by the titles of all laws which he had carried and the names of all peoples whom he had subdued. In addition, Valerius Messalla suggested that the oath of allegiance to Tiberius should be renewed annually. To a query from Tiberius, whether that expression of opinion came at his dictation, he retorted — it was the one form of flattery still left — that he had spoken of his own accord, and, when public interests were in question, he would (even at the risk of giving offence) use no man's judgment but his own. The senate clamoured for the body to be carried to the pyre on the shoulders of the Fathers. The Caesar, with haughty moderation, excused them from that duty, and warned the people by edict not to repeat the enthusiastic excesses which on a former day had marred the funeral of the deified Julius, by desiring Augustus to be cremated in the Forum rather than in the Field of Mars, his appointed resting-place. On the day of the ceremony, the troops were drawn up as though on guard, amid the jeers of those who had seen with their eyes, or whose fathers had declared to them, that day of still novel servitude and freedom disastrously re-wooed, when the killing of the dictator Caesar to some had seemed the worst, and to others the fairest, of high exploits:— "And now an aged prince, a veteran potentate, who had seen to it that not even his heirs should lack for means to coerce their country, must needs have military protection to ensure a peaceable burial! 1.33.  In the meantime, Germanicus, as we have stated, was traversing the Gallic provinces and assessing their tribute, when the message came that Augustus was no more. Married to the late emperor's granddaughter Agrippina, who had borne him several children, and himself a grandchild of the dowager (he was the son of Tiberius' brother Drusus), he was tormented none the less by the secret hatred of his uncle and grandmother — hatred springing from motives the more potent because iniquitous. For Drusus was still a living memory to the nation, and it was believed that, had he succeeded, he would have restored the age of liberty; whence the same affection and hopes centred on the young Germanicus with his unassuming disposition and his exceptional courtesy, so far removed from the inscrutable arrogance of word and look which characterized Tiberius. Feminine animosities increased the tension as Livia had a stepmother's irritable dislike of Agrippina, whose own temper was not without a hint of fire, though purity of mind and wifely devotion kept her rebellious spirit on the side of righteousness.
16. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 1.2.6, 1.5-1.19, 1.18.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, vote on arms of Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 31
aeneas Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80; Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 112
aias, and athena, odysseus in decision on achilles arms Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 31
alexis Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 112
ambiguity de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 171
aristomenes Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
aristotle Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 112
art work, as object of gaze Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
asinius pollio Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
athena, decision on achilles arms (fig. Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 31
augustus, his funeral Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
authentic versus copy, and pleasure Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106, 112
barberini togatus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
catullus, poem Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
clodius pulcher, p., his funeral Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
curiosity Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
danaans Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106, 112
demodokos Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 31
douris Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 31
ekphrasis Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 112
emotion, aesthetic emotion de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 171
emotion, description of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 149
emotions, admiration/awe de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 171
focalization, embedded (or secondary) de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 149
funerals, and virtus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
funerals Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
gaze, focused on work of art Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
gaze, in ekphrasis Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
gaze, in virgils aeneid Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
heracles, αι\x14δω\x17 ς of Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 31
house, imagines in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
imagines, in funerals Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
impietas against, and memory Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
impietas against, and virtus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
impietas against, veneration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
impietas against, viewer response to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
julius caesar, c., his funeral Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
labyrinth de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 171
laertes de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 149
libraries Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
metalepsis de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 171
mind reading de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 149
mirror (miroir) de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 171
mise en abyme de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 171
mos maiorum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
narratee de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 149
oaths, outstretched arm Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 31
odysseus, and decision on achilles arms Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 31
odysseus, αι\x1dδω\x1d ς of Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 31
odysseus Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 149, 171
orestes, gestures in art Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 31
phaeacians Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 31
phaedo Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 31
phaedra Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 31
philemon Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 112
philostratus and callistratus, in virgils aeneid Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
plane tree Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
plato and platonism Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
pliny the elder Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
polybius, on roman funerals Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
pomponius atticus, t. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
recognition, scenes of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 149
response, emotional, to work of art, in virgils aeneid Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus, cult statue of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
sallust, on imagines Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
shock, aesthetic shock de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 171
slaves Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 112
socrates Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 31
socrates (character) Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
socrates (philosopher) Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
socratic dialogue Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
tacitus, on imagines Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
theater and theatricality Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
trojan war, frescoes described in virgils aeneid Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
trojans Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106, 112
valerius publicola, p., his hebdomades Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
vergil, on junos temple at carthage Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 112
viewers, elite versus non-elite Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
viewers, shared values of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
viewing, in virgils aeneid Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
virgil, aeneid Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
virtus, and memory Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 106
witches and witchcraft' Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
wonder, inspired by gazing at work of art Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80