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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 8.521-8.531
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ἄστεϊ καὶ τεκέεσσιν ἀμύνων νηλεὲς ἦμαρ·warding off ruthless day from his city and children, and as she sees him gasping and dying, she throws her arms around him, and loudly wails, but those behind her strike her back and shoulders with their spears and lead her into bondage, to have hard work and hardship
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τῆς δʼ ἐλεεινοτάτῳ ἄχεϊ φθινύθουσι παρειαί·and her cheeks waste away with the most piteous grief, so Odysseus let piteous tears fall from under his brows. He went unnoticed there by all the others, shedding tears, and Alcinous alone noticed him and understood. He sat near him and heard him moaning deeply
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.474, 4.164-4.165, 6.448-6.449, 9.189, 19.301-19.302, 22.408-22.411, 24.776 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.474. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on 4.164. /For even if for the moment the Olympian vouchsafeth not fulfillment, yet late and at length doth he fulfill them, and with a heavy price do men make atonement, even with their own heads and their wives and their children. For of a surety know I this in heart and soul: the day shall come when sacred Ilios shall be laid low 4.165. /and Priam, and the people of Priam, with goodly spear of ash; and Zeus, son of Cronos, throned on high, that dwelleth in the heaven, shall himself shake over them all his dark aegis in wrath for this deceit. These things verily shall not fail of fulfillment; yet dread grief for thee shall be mine, O Menelaus 6.448. /always and to fight amid the foremost Trojans, striving to win my father's great glory and mine own. For of a surety know I this in heart and soul: the day shall come when sacred Ilios shall be laid low, and Priam, and the people of Priam with goodly spear of ash. 6.449. /always and to fight amid the foremost Trojans, striving to win my father's great glory and mine own. For of a surety know I this in heart and soul: the day shall come when sacred Ilios shall be laid low, and Priam, and the people of Priam with goodly spear of ash. 9.189. /And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 19.301. /Wherefore I wail for thee in thy death and know no ceasing, for thou wast ever kind. So spake she wailing, and thereto the women added their laments; Patroclus indeed they mourned, but therewithal each one her own sorrows. But around Achilles gathered the elders of the Achaeans, beseeching him that he would eat; but he refused them, moaning the while: 19.302. /Wherefore I wail for thee in thy death and know no ceasing, for thou wast ever kind. So spake she wailing, and thereto the women added their laments; Patroclus indeed they mourned, but therewithal each one her own sorrows. But around Achilles gathered the elders of the Achaeans, beseeching him that he would eat; but he refused them, moaning the while: 22.408. /So was his head all befouled with dust; but his mother tore her hair and from her flung far her gleaming veil and uttered a cry exceeding loud at sight of her son. And a piteous groan did his father utter, and around them the folk was holden of wailing and groaning throughout the city. 22.409. /So was his head all befouled with dust; but his mother tore her hair and from her flung far her gleaming veil and uttered a cry exceeding loud at sight of her son. And a piteous groan did his father utter, and around them the folk was holden of wailing and groaning throughout the city. 22.410. /Most like to this was it as though all beetling Ilios were utterly burning with fire. And the folk had much ado to hold back the old man in his frenzy, fain as he was to go forth from the Dardanian gates. To all he made prayer, grovelling the while in the filth 22.411. /Most like to this was it as though all beetling Ilios were utterly burning with fire. And the folk had much ado to hold back the old man in his frenzy, fain as he was to go forth from the Dardanian gates. To all he made prayer, grovelling the while in the filth 24.776. /that is gentle to me or kind; but all men shudder at me.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 1.154, 1.325-1.327, 1.337-1.344, 1.347, 1.422, 8.33-8.36, 8.72-8.92, 8.266-8.369, 8.480-8.481, 8.487-8.520, 8.522-8.531, 8.577-8.580, 11.367-11.369, 12.188, 17.385, 17.518-17.521, 17.606, 18.304, 21.406-21.409, 22.330 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.250, 1.453-1.495, 1.740-1.747, 6.20-6.33, 8.608-8.731 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.250. the whole herd, browsing through the lowland vale 1.453. art thou bright Phoebus' sister? Or some nymph 1.454. the daughter of a god? Whate'er thou art 1.455. thy favor we implore, and potent aid 1.456. in our vast toil. Instruct us of what skies 1.457. or what world's end, our storm-swept lives have found! 1.458. Strange are these lands and people where we rove 1.459. compelled by wind and wave. Lo, this right hand 1.461. Then Venus: “Nay, I boast not to receive 1.462. honors divine. We Tyrian virgins oft 1.463. bear bow and quiver, and our ankles white 1.464. lace up in purple buskin. Yonder lies 1.465. the Punic power, where Tyrian masters hold 1.466. Agenor's town; but on its borders dwell 1.467. the Libyans, by battles unsubdued. 1.468. Upon the throne is Dido, exiled there 1.469. from Tyre, to flee th' unnatural enmity 1.470. of her own brother. 'T was an ancient wrong; 1.471. too Iong the dark and tangled tale would be; 1.472. I trace the larger outline of her story: 1.473. Sichreus was her spouse, whose acres broad 1.474. no Tyrian lord could match, and he was-blessed 1.475. by his ill-fated lady's fondest love 1.476. whose father gave him her first virgin bloom 1.477. in youthful marriage. But the kingly power 1.478. among the Tyrians to her brother came 1.479. Pygmalion, none deeper dyed in crime 1.480. in all that land. Betwixt these twain there rose 1.481. a deadly hatred,—and the impious wretch 1.482. blinded by greed, and reckless utterly 1.483. of his fond sister's joy, did murder foul 1.484. upon defenceless and unarmed Sichaeus 1.485. and at the very altar hewed him down. 1.486. Long did he hide the deed, and guilefully 1.487. deceived with false hopes, and empty words 1.488. her grief and stricken love. But as she slept 1.489. her husband's tombless ghost before her came 1.490. with face all wondrous pale, and he laid bare 1.491. his heart with dagger pierced, disclosing so 1.492. the blood-stained altar and the infamy 1.493. that darkened now their house. His counsel was 1.494. to fly, self-banished, from her ruined land 1.495. and for her journey's aid, he whispered where 1.740. uch haughty violence fits not the souls 1.741. of vanquished men. We journey to a land 1.742. named, in Greek syllables, Hesperia : 1.743. a storied realm, made mighty by great wars 1.744. and wealth of fruitful land; in former days 1.745. Oenotrians had it, and their sons, 't is said 1.746. have called it Italy, a chieftain's name 1.747. to a whole region given. Thitherward 6.20. Here Daedalus, the ancient story tells 6.21. Escaping Minos' power, and having made 6.22. Hazard of heaven on far-mounting wings 6.23. Floated to northward, a cold, trackless way 6.24. And lightly poised, at last, o'er Cumae 's towers. 6.25. Here first to earth come down, he gave to thee 6.26. His gear of wings, Apollo! and ordained 6.27. Vast temples to thy name and altars fair. 6.28. On huge bronze doors Androgeos' death was done; 6.29. And Cecrops' children paid their debt of woe 6.30. Where, seven and seven,—0 pitiable sight!— 6.31. The youths and maidens wait the annual doom 6.32. Drawn out by lot from yonder marble urn. 6.33. Beyond, above a sea, lay carven Crete :— 8.608. ummoned Evander. From his couch arose 8.609. the royal sire, and o'er his aged frame 8.610. a tunic threw, tying beneath his feet 8.611. the Tuscan sandals: an Arcadian sword 8.612. girt at his left, was over one shoulder slung 8.613. his cloak of panther trailing from behind. 8.614. A pair of watch-dogs from the lofty door 8.615. ran close, their lord attending, as he sought 8.616. his guest Aeneas; for his princely soul 8.617. remembered faithfully his former word 8.618. and promised gift. Aeneas with like mind 8.619. was stirring early. King Evander's son 8.620. Pallas was at his side; Achates too 8.621. accompanied his friend. All these conjoin 8.622. in hand-clasp and good-morrow, taking seats 8.623. in midcourt of the house, and give the hour 8.625. “Great leader of the Teucrians, while thy life 8.626. in safety stands, I call not Trojan power 8.627. vanquished or fallen. But to help thy war 8.628. my small means match not thy redoubled name. 8.629. Yon Tuscan river is my bound. That way 8.630. Rutulia thrusts us hard and chafes our wall 8.631. with loud, besieging arms. But I propose 8.632. to league with thee a numerous array 8.633. of kings and mighty tribes, which fortune strange 8.634. now brings to thy defence. Thou comest here 8.635. because the Fates intend. Not far from ours 8.636. a city on an ancient rock is seen 8.637. Agylla, which a warlike Lydian clan 8.638. built on the Tuscan hills. It prospered well 8.639. for many a year, then under the proud yoke 8.640. of King Mezentius it came and bore 8.641. his cruel sway. Why tell the loathsome deeds 8.642. and crimes unspeakable the despot wrought? 8.643. May Heaven requite them on his impious head 8.644. and on his children! For he used to chain 8.645. dead men to living, hand on hand was laid 8.646. and face on face,—torment incredible! 8.647. Till, locked in blood-stained, horrible embrace 8.648. a lingering death they found. But at the last 8.649. his people rose in furious despair 8.650. and while he blasphemously raged, assailed 8.651. his life and throne, cut down his guards 8.652. and fired his regal dwellings; he, the while 8.653. escaped immediate death and fied away 8.654. to the Rutulian land, to find defence 8.655. in Turnus hospitality. To-day 8.656. Etruria, to righteous anger stirred 8.657. demands with urgent arms her guilty King. 8.658. To their large host, Aeneas, I will give 8.659. an added strength, thyself. For yonder shores 8.660. re-echo with the tumult and the cry 8.661. of ships in close array; their eager lords 8.662. are clamoring for battle. But the song 8.663. of the gray omen-giver thus declares 8.664. their destiny: ‘O goodly princes born 8.665. of old Maeonian lineage! Ye that are 8.666. the bloom and glory of an ancient race 8.667. whom just occasions now and noble rage 8.668. enflame against Mezentius your foe 8.669. it is decreed that yonder nation proud 8.670. hall never submit to chiefs Italian-born. 8.671. Seek ye a king from far!’ So in the field 8.672. inert and fearful lies Etruria's force 8.673. disarmed by oracles. Their Tarchon sent 8.674. envoys who bore a sceptre and a crown 8.675. even to me, and prayed I should assume 8.676. the sacred emblems of Etruria's king 8.677. and lead their host to war. But unto me 8.678. cold, sluggish age, now barren and outworn 8.679. denies new kingdoms, and my slow-paced powers 8.680. run to brave deeds no more. Nor could I urge 8.681. my son, who by his Sabine mother's line 8.682. is half Italian-born. Thyself art he 8.683. whose birth illustrious and manly prime 8.684. fate favors and celestial powers approve. 8.685. Therefore go forth, O bravest chief and King 8.686. of Troy and Italy ! To thee I give 8.687. the hope and consolation of our throne 8.688. pallas, my son, and bid him find in thee 8.689. a master and example, while he learns 8.690. the soldier's arduous toil. With thy brave deeds 8.691. let him familiar grow, and reverence thee 8.692. with youthful love and honor. In his train 8.693. two hundred horsemen of Arcadia 8.694. our choicest men-at-arms, shall ride; and he 8.695. in his own name an equal band shall bring 8.696. to follow only thee.” Such the discourse. 8.697. With meditative brows and downcast eyes 8.698. Aeneas and Achates, sad at heart 8.699. mused on unnumbered perils yet to come. 8.700. But out of cloudless sky Cythera's Queen 8.701. gave sudden signal: from th' ethereal dome 8.702. a thunder-peal and flash of quivering fire 8.703. tumultuous broke, as if the world would fall 8.704. and bellowing Tuscan trumpets shook the air. 8.705. All eyes look up. Again and yet again 8.706. crashed the terrible din, and where the sky 8.707. looked clearest hung a visionary cloud 8.708. whence through the brightness blazed resounding arms. 8.709. All hearts stood still. But Troy 's heroic son 8.710. knew that his mother in the skies redeemed 8.711. her pledge in sound of thunder: so he cried 8.712. “Seek not, my friend, seek not thyself to read 8.713. the meaning of the omen. 'T is to me 8.714. Olympus calls. My goddess-mother gave 8.715. long since her promise of a heavenly sign 8.716. if war should burst; and that her power would bring 8.717. a panoply from Vulcan through the air 8.718. to help us at our need. Alas, what deaths 8.719. over Laurentum's ill-starred host impend! 8.720. O Turnus, what a reckoning thou shalt pay 8.721. to me in arms! O Tiber, in thy wave 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain 8.723. hall in confusion roll! Yea, let them lead 8.725. He said: and from the lofty throne uprose. 8.726. Straightway he roused anew the slumbering fire 8.727. acred to Hercules, and glad at heart 8.728. adored, as yesterday, the household gods 8.729. revered by good Evander, at whose side 8.730. the Trojan company made sacrifice 8.731. of chosen lambs, with fitting rites and true.
4. Nilus of Ancyra, Narrationes Septem De Monachis In Sina, 6.9, 6.11 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

5. Prudentius, On The Crown of Martyrdom, 9 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, evolution of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 59
achilles, quarrel with odysseus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
achilles tatius de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 686
aeneas, narrator Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
aeneas Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80; Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
agamemnon Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 256
alcinous Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
anger, in greek epic Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 59
anger of achilles Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 59
antiphony Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 256
aphrodite Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
arctinus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
art work, as object of gaze Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
barbarians de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 686
briseis Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 59
captivity Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 305
catullus, poem Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
characterization de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 686
demodocus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 59; Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
dido Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129; Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 305
ecphrasis' Burton, Dionysus and Rome: Religion and Literature (2009) 40
eleos/eleeo and aristotle, in homer Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 59
emotion, description of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 149
emotional restraint de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 686
emotions, desire de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 686
emotions, dismay de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 686
epic Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 305
epic cycle Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
epic poetry, greek Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 59
eremitic monasticism de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 686
ethical qualities, craftiness, deceit, deception, disguise, feigning, guile, sleight of hand, trickery (dolus, dolos) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
fabula de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 686
focalization, embedded (or secondary) de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 149
gaze, focused on work of art Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
gaze, in ekphrasis Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
gaze, in virgils aeneid Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
hector Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 256
hero Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
historiography greek Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 59
homer, lucans use of Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 256
homer, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 256
homer/homeric Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 59
homer Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 21
iliad Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
intertextuality, allusion, two-tier intertextuality, model Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
iopas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
konstan, david Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 59
laertes de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 149
lesches Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
memory, poetic Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 306
mind reading de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 149
mise en abyme Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 21
monasticism (eremetic) de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 686
mourning, for patroclus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 59
narratee de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 149
narratives Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
narrators, internal, aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
narrators, odyssean Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
odysseus, and demodocus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 59
odysseus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129; Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 256; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 149
patroclus, death of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 59
philosophy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
philostratus and callistratus, in virgils aeneid Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
pity, of achilles Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 59
pity, self-pity Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 59
pseudo-nilus de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 686
recognition, scenes of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 149
response, emotional, to work of art, in virgils aeneid Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
romance, greek Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 59
spiritual growth/development de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 686
story Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
tears de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 686
third ways Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
time, analepsis de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 686
tragedy, greek Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
tragedy, roman Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
tragedy Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 305, 306
trojan war, frescoes described in virgils aeneid Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
trojan war Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129; Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 21
trojans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
troy/trojans Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 59
troy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, cyclic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, odyssean Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 129
viewing, in virgils aeneid Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
virgil, aeneid Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80
wonder, inspired by gazing at work of art Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 80