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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 7.107-7.110
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ἱστῶν τεχνῆσσαι· πέρι γάρ σφισι δῶκεν Ἀθήνηin weaving at the loom, for Athena granted them, beyond others, skill in making gorgeous works and good dispositions. Outside the courtyard near the doors is a large orchard, four measures big, and a wall is driven round it on both sides. Trees grow there, tall and luxuriant


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.353-2.365, 3.86-3.100 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.353. /For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan 2.354. /For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan 2.355. /and have got him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake. Howbeit, if any man is exceeding fain to depart homewards, let him lay his hand upon his black, well-benched ship, that before the face of all he may meet death and fate. 2.356. /and have got him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake. Howbeit, if any man is exceeding fain to depart homewards, let him lay his hand upon his black, well-benched ship, that before the face of all he may meet death and fate. 2.357. /and have got him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake. Howbeit, if any man is exceeding fain to depart homewards, let him lay his hand upon his black, well-benched ship, that before the face of all he may meet death and fate. 2.358. /and have got him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake. Howbeit, if any man is exceeding fain to depart homewards, let him lay his hand upon his black, well-benched ship, that before the face of all he may meet death and fate. 2.359. /and have got him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake. Howbeit, if any man is exceeding fain to depart homewards, let him lay his hand upon his black, well-benched ship, that before the face of all he may meet death and fate. 2.360. /But do thou, O King, thyself take good counsel, and hearken to another; the word whatsoever I speak, shalt thou not lightly cast aside. Separate thy men by tribes, by clans, Agamemnon, that clan may bear aid to clan and tribe to tribe. If thou do thus, and the Achaeans obey thee 2.361. /But do thou, O King, thyself take good counsel, and hearken to another; the word whatsoever I speak, shalt thou not lightly cast aside. Separate thy men by tribes, by clans, Agamemnon, that clan may bear aid to clan and tribe to tribe. If thou do thus, and the Achaeans obey thee 2.362. /But do thou, O King, thyself take good counsel, and hearken to another; the word whatsoever I speak, shalt thou not lightly cast aside. Separate thy men by tribes, by clans, Agamemnon, that clan may bear aid to clan and tribe to tribe. If thou do thus, and the Achaeans obey thee 2.363. /But do thou, O King, thyself take good counsel, and hearken to another; the word whatsoever I speak, shalt thou not lightly cast aside. Separate thy men by tribes, by clans, Agamemnon, that clan may bear aid to clan and tribe to tribe. If thou do thus, and the Achaeans obey thee 2.364. /But do thou, O King, thyself take good counsel, and hearken to another; the word whatsoever I speak, shalt thou not lightly cast aside. Separate thy men by tribes, by clans, Agamemnon, that clan may bear aid to clan and tribe to tribe. If thou do thus, and the Achaeans obey thee 2.365. /thou wilt know then who among thy captains is a coward, and who among thy men, and who too is brave; for they will fight each clan for itself. So shalt thou know whether it is even by the will of heaven that thou shalt not take the city, or by the cowardice of thy folk and their witlessness in war. 3.86. /And Hector spake between the two hosts:Hear from me, ye Trojans and well-greaved Achaeans, the words of Alexander, for whose sake strife hath been set afoot. The other Trojans and all the Achaeans he biddeth to lay aside their goodly battle-gear upon the bounteous earth 3.87. /And Hector spake between the two hosts:Hear from me, ye Trojans and well-greaved Achaeans, the words of Alexander, for whose sake strife hath been set afoot. The other Trojans and all the Achaeans he biddeth to lay aside their goodly battle-gear upon the bounteous earth 3.88. /And Hector spake between the two hosts:Hear from me, ye Trojans and well-greaved Achaeans, the words of Alexander, for whose sake strife hath been set afoot. The other Trojans and all the Achaeans he biddeth to lay aside their goodly battle-gear upon the bounteous earth 3.89. /And Hector spake between the two hosts:Hear from me, ye Trojans and well-greaved Achaeans, the words of Alexander, for whose sake strife hath been set afoot. The other Trojans and all the Achaeans he biddeth to lay aside their goodly battle-gear upon the bounteous earth 3.90. /and himself in the midst and Menelaus, dear to Ares, to do battle for Helen and all her possessions. And whichsoever of the twain shall win, and prove him the better man, let him duly take all the wealth and the woman, and bear them to his home; but for us others, let us swear friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice. 3.91. /and himself in the midst and Menelaus, dear to Ares, to do battle for Helen and all her possessions. And whichsoever of the twain shall win, and prove him the better man, let him duly take all the wealth and the woman, and bear them to his home; but for us others, let us swear friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice. 3.92. /and himself in the midst and Menelaus, dear to Ares, to do battle for Helen and all her possessions. And whichsoever of the twain shall win, and prove him the better man, let him duly take all the wealth and the woman, and bear them to his home; but for us others, let us swear friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice. 3.93. /and himself in the midst and Menelaus, dear to Ares, to do battle for Helen and all her possessions. And whichsoever of the twain shall win, and prove him the better man, let him duly take all the wealth and the woman, and bear them to his home; but for us others, let us swear friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice. 3.94. /and himself in the midst and Menelaus, dear to Ares, to do battle for Helen and all her possessions. And whichsoever of the twain shall win, and prove him the better man, let him duly take all the wealth and the woman, and bear them to his home; but for us others, let us swear friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice. 3.95. /So spake he, and they all became hushed in silence; and among them spake Menelaus, good at the war-cry:Hearken ye now also unto me, for upon my heart above all others hath sorrow come; my mind is that Argives and Trojans now be parted, seeing ye have suffered many woes 3.96. /So spake he, and they all became hushed in silence; and among them spake Menelaus, good at the war-cry:Hearken ye now also unto me, for upon my heart above all others hath sorrow come; my mind is that Argives and Trojans now be parted, seeing ye have suffered many woes 3.97. /So spake he, and they all became hushed in silence; and among them spake Menelaus, good at the war-cry:Hearken ye now also unto me, for upon my heart above all others hath sorrow come; my mind is that Argives and Trojans now be parted, seeing ye have suffered many woes 3.98. /So spake he, and they all became hushed in silence; and among them spake Menelaus, good at the war-cry:Hearken ye now also unto me, for upon my heart above all others hath sorrow come; my mind is that Argives and Trojans now be parted, seeing ye have suffered many woes 3.99. /So spake he, and they all became hushed in silence; and among them spake Menelaus, good at the war-cry:Hearken ye now also unto me, for upon my heart above all others hath sorrow come; my mind is that Argives and Trojans now be parted, seeing ye have suffered many woes 3.100. /because of my quarrel and Alexander's beginning thereof. And for whichsoever of us twain death and fate are appointed, let him lie dead; but be ye others parted with all speed. Bring ye two lambs, a white ram and a black ewe, for Earth and Sun, and for Zeus we will bring another;
2. Homer, Odyssey, 5.34-5.37, 6.4-6.6, 6.33-6.35, 6.270-6.272, 7.71-7.72, 7.84-7.97, 7.101-7.102, 7.104-7.106, 7.108-7.110, 7.114-7.128, 7.167-7.175, 7.189-7.196, 7.199, 7.201-7.206, 7.290-7.293, 8.246-8.249, 8.564-8.571, 9.108, 9.112-9.115, 14.433 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Plutarch, On The Obsolescence of Oracles, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

415b. and sometimes to speak of the gods as demigods; but Hesiod was the first to set forth clearly and distinctly four classes of rational beings: gods, demigods, heroes, in this order, and, last of all, men; and as a sequence to this, apparently, he postulates his transmutation, the golden race passing selectively into many good divinities, and the demigods into heroes. "Others postulate a transmutation for bodies and souls alike; in the same manner in which water is seen to be generated from earth, air from water, and fire from air, as their substance is borne upward, even so from men into heroes and from heroes into demigods the better souls obtain their transmutation. But from the demigod
4. Plutarch, On The E At Delphi, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
age, categorization of women by Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 56
age, of amphipoloi Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 57
amphipoloi Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 56, 57
arete, wife of alcinous Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 57
artemis, and nymphs Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 57
artemis, parthenos Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 56, 57
beaut~ Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 56, 57
competition, sexual, suitors'" '458.0_57.0@epics, women of Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 56
contingency Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 44
delphi Brenk and Lanzillotta, Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians (2023) 56
epics, women of Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 56
goddesses Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 56
homer Brenk and Lanzillotta, Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians (2023) 56; Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 56, 57; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 44; Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 143
immortality Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 44
marriage, competition over Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 56
marriage, homeric Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 56
mimesis Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 44
myth, and geography Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 44
nausicaa Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 56, 57
nymphs Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 57
odysseus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 44
oracles Brenk and Lanzillotta, Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians (2023) 56
parthenoi, beauty Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 56, 57
parthenoi, homeric Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 56, 57
parthenoi, taming Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 57
parthenoi Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 56, 57
poetry, as a remedy against oblivion Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 44
polyphemus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 44
poseidon Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 44
pythian Brenk and Lanzillotta, Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians (2023) 56
quotations Brenk and Lanzillotta, Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians (2023) 56
source Brenk and Lanzillotta, Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians (2023) 56
trojan war, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 44
utopia Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 44
xenia' Naiden,Ancient Suppliation (2006)" 143