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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 5.264-5.493
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ἐν δέ οἱ ἀσκὸν ἔθηκε θεὰ μέλανος οἴνοιοThe goddess put a leather bag of black wine on board for him, and another one, a big one of water, and provisions too, in a sack in which she put many cooked meats in abundance, and sent forth a fair wind, warm and gentle. Joyful at the fair wind, divine Odysseus spread the sail.
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αὐτὰρ ὁ πηδαλίῳ ἰθύνετο τεχνηέντωςThen he sat and steered skillfully with the steering oar, and sleep didn't fall upon his eyelids as he looked at the Pleiades, and late setting Bootes, and the Bear, which they also call the Wagon as another name, that turns in its place and watches Orion
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οἴη δʼ ἄμμορός ἐστι λοετρῶν Ὠκεανοῖο·and is the only one without a share of Ocean's baths. For the goddess divine, Calypso, had bid him keep it on his left hand as he sailed the sea. Seventeen days he sailed, sailing on the sea, and on the eighteenth, the shadowy mountains of the Phaeacians'
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γαίης Φαιήκων, ὅθι τʼ ἄγχιστον πέλεν αὐτῷ·land appeared, where it was closest to him, and it looked like a shield in the misty water. Coming back from the Ethiopians, his majesty the Earth-shaker saw him from far away, from the mountains of the Solymi, for he could be seen sailing over the sea. He became the more enraged at heart
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κινήσας δὲ κάρη προτὶ ὃν μυθήσατο θυμόν·and with a shake of his head said to his own spirit: “Humph! Yes, the gods have surely changed their minds about Odysseus while I was among the Ethiopians, and he's near the Phaeacians' land at last, where it's his destiny to escape the great bond of misery that's come to him.
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ἀλλʼ ἔτι μέν μίν φημι ἅδην ἐλάαν κακότητος.But I think I'll yet drive him to his fill of evil.” So saying, he gathered clouds, grasped his trident in his hands, and stirred the sea into confusion. He incited all the gusts of winds of every kind, and hid with clouds both land and sea, as night rushed from heaven.
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σὺν δʼ Εὖρός τε Νότος τʼ ἔπεσον Ζέφυρός τε δυσαὴςEast Wind and South Wind, and ill-blowing West Wind, and North Wind, born of the upper air and rolling a great wave, fell together. Right then Odysseus' knees and dear heart were undone, and troubled, he said to his own great-hearted spirit: “Oh my, wretched me, what surely may become of me at last?
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δείδω μὴ δὴ πάντα θεὰ νημερτέα εἶπενI fear the goddess spoke everything infallibly, who said that on the sea, before I reached my fatherland, I'd have my fill of sorrows, which are now all come to pass. Zeus wreathes wide heaven with such clouds and troubles the sea, and windstorms, of all kinds of winds
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παντοίων ἀνέμων. νῦν μοι σῶς αἰπὺς ὄλεθρος.rush upon me. Sheer destruction is certain now for me! Three and four times blessed were the Danaans, who perished back then in wide Troy bringing favor to the Atreidae, as I wish I'd died and met my fate on that day when the greatest number of Trojan
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Τρῶες ἐπέρριψαν περὶ Πηλεΐωνι θανόντι.threw bronzed-tipped spears at me around the dead Peleion. Then I'd have had funeral honors and Achaeans would have spread my fame, but it had been fated that I now be caught by dismal death.” As he said so, a great wave drove down on him from above, and rushing at him dreadfully, spun his raft around.
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τῆλε δʼ ἀπὸ σχεδίης αὐτὸς πέσε, πηδάλιον δὲHe himself fell far away from the raft and threw the steering oar from his hands. A dread windstorm came, of winds mixing together, and snapped his mast in the middle, and the sail and yardarm fell far off into the sea. The storm kept him underwater for a long time, and he wasn't able
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αἶψα μάλʼ ἀνσχεθέειν μεγάλου ὑπὸ κύματος ὁρμῆς·to emerge from under the wave's great onset very soon, for the clothing divine Calypso gave him weighed him down. He came up at last, and spit brine from his mouth, bitter brine that gushed in great quantity from his head. But even so, he didn't forget his raft despite his distress
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ἀλλὰ μεθορμηθεὶς ἐνὶ κύμασιν ἐλλάβετʼ αὐτῆςbut he rushed after it in the waves, grabbed hold of it, and sat down in the middle to avoid the doom of death. A great wave carried her to and fro through the current. As when in late summer North Wind carries thistles over the plain, and they hold on in clusters to each other
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ὣς τὴν ἂμ πέλαγος ἄνεμοι φέρον ἔνθα καὶ ἔνθα·o the winds bore her to and fro on the sea. At one time South Wind would cast it to North Wind to carry, at another, East Wind would yield to West Wind to drive it. Cadmus' daughter, fair-ankled Ino, saw him, Leucothea, who was a mortal of human speech before
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νῦν δʼ ἁλὸς ἐν πελάγεσσι θεῶν ἒξ ἔμμορε τιμῆς.but in the sea's depths now has her share of honor from the gods. She felt pity for Odysseus, as he wandered and had sorrows, and disguised as a gull she went up in flight from the sea, sat on the raft, and said to him: “Ill-fated one, why does Earth-shaker Poseidon hate you
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ὠδύσατʼ ἐκπάγλως, ὅτι τοι κακὰ πολλὰ φυτεύει;o terribly, that he plants evils aplenty for you? He won't destroy you, though he's very eager to. You don't seem to me to be without sense, so act in just this way. Strip off these clothes, abandon the raft to be borne by winds, then swim with your hands and strive for a return
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γαίης Φαιήκων, ὅθι τοι μοῖρʼ ἐστὶν ἀλύξαι.to the Phaeacians' land, where it's your lot to escape. Take this veil and stretch it under your chest. It's immortal. Don't have any fear that you'll suffer or perish. Then after you've laid hold of land with your hands, loosen it from you and cast it back into the wine-dark sea
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πολλὸν ἀπʼ ἠπείρου, αὐτὸς δʼ ἀπονόσφι τραπέσθαι.far from the land, and turn yourself away.” So saying, the goddess gave him the veil, then herself dove back into the billowing sea, disguised as a gull, and dark wave covered her. Then long-suffering divine Odysseus pondered
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ὀχθήσας δʼ ἄρα εἶπε πρὸς ὃν μεγαλήτορα θυμόν·and troubled, he said to his own great-hearted spirit: “Oh my me, may it not be that some immortal again weaves a trap for me, whoever orders me get off my raft? But I won't obey just yet, since I myself saw with my eyes the land is far away, where she said I'd have safe refuge.
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ἀλλὰ μάλʼ ὧδʼ ἔρξω, δοκέει δέ μοι εἶναι ἄριστον·Instead I'll do it just this way, as it seems best to me. As long as the timbers are held together by the cables, I'll stay where I am and endure it, suffering sorrows, but after the waves break my raft into pieces, I'll swim, since there's nothing better to plan besides that.”
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ἧος ὁ ταῦθʼ ὥρμαινε κατὰ φρένα καὶ κατὰ θυμόνWhile he was turning this over in his mind and heart, Earth-shaker Poseidon raised a great wave, dread and grievous, overarching, and drove it against him. As a stormy wind shakes a heap of dried chaff and scatters it in one direction and another
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ὣς τῆς δούρατα μακρὰ διεσκέδασʼ. αὐτὰρ Ὀδυσσεὺςo it scattered the long timbers. Then Odysseusstraddled one timber, as if riding a horse, and took off the clothes divine Calypso gave him. At once he stretched the veil beneath his chest, dropped down headfirst into the sea, and spread out his arms
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νηχέμεναι μεμαώς. ἴδε δὲ κρείων ἐνοσίχθωνeager to swim. His majesty Earth-shaker saw him, and with a shake of his head, said to his own spirit: “So now, suffering many evils, wander on the sea until you mingle with Zeus-nurtured men. But even so, I don't expect you'll take your badness lightly.”
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ὣς ἄρα φωνήσας ἵμασεν καλλίτριχας ἵππουςSo saying, he whipped his fair-maned horsesand went to Aegae, where he has a splendid home. Then Zeus's daughter Athena thought of other things. She tied down the courses of the other winds and bid all of them to stop and go to sleep.
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ὦρσε δʼ ἐπὶ κραιπνὸν Βορέην, πρὸ δὲ κύματʼ ἔαξενShe roused swift North Wind and broke the waves before him until he could mingle with the oar-loving Phaeacians, Zeus-born Odysseus, escaping death's spirits and death. Then for two nights and two days he was driven off course by the solid wave, and many times his heart foresaw destruction.
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ἀλλʼ ὅτε δὴ τρίτον ἦμαρ ἐυπλόκαμος τέλεσʼ ἨώςBut when fair-haired Dawn brought the third day on, right then after that the wind stopped and there was a windless calm. He caught sight of land nearby, looking forward very keenly when lifted by a great wave. As when life appears welcome to the children
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πατρός, ὃς ἐν νούσῳ κεῖται κρατέρʼ ἄλγεα πάσχωνof a father who lies in sickness and suffers mighty pains, wasting away a long time as some loathesome divinity assails him, and then welcomely, the gods free him from the badness, so welcome to Odysseus seemed the land and woodland, and he swam in eager haste to set foot on the land.
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ἀλλʼ ὅτε τόσσον ἀπῆν ὅσσον τε γέγωνε βοήσαςBut when he was as far away as one shouting can be heard, he heard the thud of the sea against the reefs, for a great wave was crashing against the dry land, belching terribly, and all was wrapped in sea's spray. For there were no harbors, ships' holders, not even roadsteads
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ἀλλʼ ἀκταὶ προβλῆτες ἔσαν σπιλάδες τε πάγοι τε·but there were jutting spits, rocks, and reefs. Right then Odysseus' knees and dear heart were undone, and troubled, he said to his own great-hearted spirit: “O my, after Zeus has granted that I see unhoped for land, and I've managed at last to cut through this gulf
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ἔκβασις οὔ πῃ φαίνεθʼ ἁλὸς πολιοῖο θύραζε·no exit out of the gray sea appears anywhere. For outside there are sharp rocks, and dashing waves bellow about them, then the rock runs up smooth, the sea is deep near shore, and it's not possible to stand with both feet and escape distress
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μή πώς μʼ ἐκβαίνοντα βάλῃ λίθακι ποτὶ πέτρῃlest a great wave perhaps snatch me as I get out and throw me against the stony rock and my effort will be in vain. But if I swim along still further, in hope of finding beaches, angled to the waves and harbors from the sea, I'm afraid a windstorm may snatch me up again
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πόντον ἐπʼ ἰχθυόεντα φέρῃ βαρέα στενάχονταand bear me, groaning heavily, over the fishy sea, or a divinity may set upon me some great monster out of the sea, such as the many famed Amphitrite breeds, for I know how the famed Earth-shaker hates me.” While he was turning this over in his mind and heart
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τόφρα δέ μιν μέγα κῦμα φέρε τρηχεῖαν ἐπʼ ἀκτήν.a great wave carried him to the rugged shore. His skin would have been stripped off there, and his bones crushed with it, if bright-eyed goddess Athena hadn't put this in his mind. He rushed at the rock and grabbed it with both hands. He held onto it, groaning, until the great wave passed.
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καὶ τὸ μὲν ὣς ὑπάλυξε, παλιρρόθιον δέ μιν αὖτιςAnd this way he escaped it, but as it flowed back again it rushed at him and struck him, then threw him far out on the sea. As when pebbles cling thickly to the suckers of an octopus pulled out of its hole, so the skin was stripped away from his bold hand
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ῥινοὶ ἀπέδρυφθεν· τὸν δὲ μέγα κῦμα κάλυψεν.against the rocks. The great wave now covered him. Then, wretched beyond his lot, Odysseus would have perished had not bright-eyed Athena given him prudence. Emerging from the wave as it belched toward the mainland, he swam out along it, looking toward land in hope he'd find
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ἠιόνας τε παραπλῆγας λιμένας τε θαλάσσης.beaches, angled to the waves and harbors from the sea. But when he swam and reached the mouth of a fair-flowing river, there the place seemed best, free of rocks, and there was shelter from the wind. He recognized him flowing forth and in his heart he prayed:
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κλῦθι, ἄναξ, ὅτις ἐσσί· πολύλλιστον δέ σʼ ἱκάνω“Listen, lord, whoever you are. I reach you, long prayed for, as I flee out of the sea from the threats of Poseidon. He's worthy of compassion, even for immortal gods, any man who comes as a wanderer, as I come too now to your current and to your knees, after much toil.
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ἀλλʼ ἐλέαιρε, ἄναξ· ἱκέτης δέ τοι εὔχομαι εἶναι.So have mercy, lord. I claim that I'm your suppliant.” So said he, and he immediately stopped his current, held the wave, made a calm before him, and brought him safely into the river's outlet. He bent both his knees and his well-knit hands, for his dear heart had been tamed by the sea.
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ᾤδεε δὲ χρόα πάντα, θάλασσα δὲ κήκιε πολλὴAll his flesh was swollen, and much sea oozed up through his nose and mouth. He lay breathless and speechless, with barely strength to move, and grim exhaustion had reached him. But when he came to and his spirit gathered in his heart, right then he loosened the god's veil from him
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καὶ τὸ μὲν ἐς ποταμὸν ἁλιμυρήεντα μεθῆκενand threw it into the river as it flowed into the sea. A great wave carried it back down the current, and Ino at once received it in her dear hands. He drew back from the river, leaned under a bed of reeds, kissed the grain-giving earth, and troubled, said to his own great-hearted spirit:
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ὤ μοι ἐγώ, τί πάθω; τί νύ μοι μήκιστα γένηται;“Oh my me, what am I to suffer? What surely may become of me at last? If I keep watch in the river through the uncomfortable night, I'm afraid evil frost and fresh dew together will tame me, when from weakness I gasp out my spirit, and the breeze from the river blows chill early in the morning.
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εἰ δέ κεν ἐς κλιτὺν ἀναβὰς καὶ δάσκιον ὕληνIf I climb the hillside to the thickly-shaded woods, and lie down to sleep in the thick bushes, in hope that cold and exhaustion let go of me and sweet sleep come upon me, I'm afraid I'll become the spoil and prey for wild beasts.” Upon consideration, this seemed better to him.
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βῆ ῥʼ ἴμεν εἰς ὕλην· τὴν δὲ σχεδὸν ὕδατος εὗρενHe made his way to the woods. He found it near the water in a clearing. He went under two bushes growing out of the same place, one a wild olive, one an olive. Neither the strength of wetly blowing wind would blow through them nor would the shining sun ever beat them with its rays
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οὔτʼ ὄμβρος περάασκε διαμπερές· ὣς ἄρα πυκνοὶnor would rain penetrate through them, they grew so thickly, intertwined with each other. Odysseus crawled under them. At once he scraped together a bed with his dear hands, a wide one, for there was a pile of leaves big enough to shelter either two or three men
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ὥρῃ χειμερίῃ, εἰ καὶ μάλα περ χαλεπαίνοι.in wintertime, even if it was very hard. Long-suffering divine Odysseus saw it and was glad, then lay in the middle and poured a pile of leaves upon himself. As when someone hides a firebrand in a black pile of ashes, on a remote farm with no other neighbors beside him
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σπέρμα πυρὸς σώζων, ἵνα μή ποθεν ἄλλοθεν αὔοιto save a seed of fire, so not to get a light from somewhere else, so did Odysseus hide himself with leaves. Then Athenapoured sleep upon his eyes, so she might most quickly give him rest from toilsome exhaustion by shrouding his dear eyelids.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Numbers, 27.8 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

27.8. וְאֶל־בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל תְּדַבֵּר לֵאמֹר אִישׁ כִּי־יָמוּת וּבֵן אֵין לוֹ וְהַעֲבַרְתֶּם אֶת־נַחֲלָתוֹ לְבִתּוֹ׃ 27.8. And thou shalt speak unto the children of Israel, saying: If a man die, and have no son, then ye shall cause his inheritance to pass unto his daughter."
2. Homer, Iliad, 21.240, 24.33-24.35, 24.66-24.70 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

21.240. /In terrible wise about Achilles towered the tumultuous wave, and the stream as it beat upon his shield thrust him backward, nor might he avail to stand firm upon his feet. Then grasped he an elm, shapely and tall, but it fell uprooted and tore away all the bank, and stretched over the fair streams 24.33. /and gave precedence to her who furthered his fatal lustfulness. But when at length the twelfth morn thereafter was come, then among the immortals spake Phoebus Apollo:Cruel are ye, O ye gods, and workers of bane. Hath Hector then never burned for you thighs of bulls and goats without blemish? 24.34. /and gave precedence to her who furthered his fatal lustfulness. But when at length the twelfth morn thereafter was come, then among the immortals spake Phoebus Apollo:Cruel are ye, O ye gods, and workers of bane. Hath Hector then never burned for you thighs of bulls and goats without blemish? 24.35. /Him now have ye not the heart to save, a corpse though he be, for his wife to look upon and his mother and his child, and his father Priam and his people, who would forthwith burn him in the fire and pay him funeral rites. Nay, it is the ruthless Achilles, O ye gods, that ye are fain to succour 24.66. / Hera, be not thou utterly wroth against the gods; the honour of these twain shall not be as one; howbeit Hector too was dearest to the gods of all mortals that are in Ilios. So was he to me at least, for nowise failed he of acceptable gifts. For never was my altar in lack of the equal feast 24.67. / Hera, be not thou utterly wroth against the gods; the honour of these twain shall not be as one; howbeit Hector too was dearest to the gods of all mortals that are in Ilios. So was he to me at least, for nowise failed he of acceptable gifts. For never was my altar in lack of the equal feast 24.68. / Hera, be not thou utterly wroth against the gods; the honour of these twain shall not be as one; howbeit Hector too was dearest to the gods of all mortals that are in Ilios. So was he to me at least, for nowise failed he of acceptable gifts. For never was my altar in lack of the equal feast 24.69. / Hera, be not thou utterly wroth against the gods; the honour of these twain shall not be as one; howbeit Hector too was dearest to the gods of all mortals that are in Ilios. So was he to me at least, for nowise failed he of acceptable gifts. For never was my altar in lack of the equal feast 24.70. /the drink-offiering and the savour of burnt-offering, even the worship that is our due. Howbeit of the stealing away of bold Hector will we naught; it may not be but that Achilles would be ware thereof; for verily his mother cometh ever to his side alike by night and day. But I would that one of the gods would call Thetis to come unto me
3. Homer, Odyssey, 5.232-5.263, 5.265-5.493, 6.206, 9.39-9.61, 9.64-9.75, 9.79-9.104, 9.250-9.414, 10.1-10.31, 10.80-10.132, 10.170-10.215, 10.307-10.374, 12.166-12.200, 12.208-12.220, 12.233-12.259, 13.288, 13.291-13.310, 13.312-13.321, 13.418 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

99c. the power which causes things to be now placed as it is best for them to be placed, nor do they think it has any divine force, but they think they can find a new Atlas more powerful and more immortal and more all-embracing than this, and in truth they give no thought to the good, which must embrace and hold together all things. Now I would gladly be the pupil of anyone who would teach me the nature of such a cause; but since that was denied me and I was not able to discover it myself or to learn of it from anyone else
5. Proclus, Hymni, 3.3-3.4, 3.6, 3.15, 7.14 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abraham, in odyssey Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
abraham, odysseus Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
abraham, tobiah Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
academy Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 379
acropolis, in the aeneid Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 93
addressee Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 383, 389
aeneas (hero) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 387
ajax telamonius Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 93
alcinous (odyssey) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 379
allegory / allegorisation Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 383
aphrodite Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 387
apollo Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 387
ares Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 379
athena Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17, 387, 391
carthaginians, in the aeneid Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 93
carthaginians, portrait of Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 93
chaldaean oracles Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389
christianity / christians Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17
cult Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 387
curse Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
damascius Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17
death Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389
demiurge Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389
dialectic argument Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 204
dionysus Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389
empire, imperial administration Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17
empire, imperial politics Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17
endogamy Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
exegesis Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 387
family, in tobit Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
family Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17
father, divine father Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389
fish Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
gabael Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
grammar Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 388
grave Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389
hector Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 387
heroism Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 204
homer, odysseus, love and adventures Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, aea Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, aeolus Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, alcinous Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, carybdis Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, cicones Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, circe Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, cyclops, cyclopes Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, ino-leucothea Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, ithaca Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, laestrygonians Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, lotus-eaters Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, ogygia Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, phaeacians Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, polyphemus Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, poseidon Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, scheria Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, scylla Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, sirens Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
homer Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17, 388
homeric motifs Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17, 379, 383, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391
hymn Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17, 379, 383, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391
iliad Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17
inheritance, moral and religious Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
inspiration Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 383
intermediaries, divine, azariah, dispatched to rages Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
intertextuality Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17, 388
ithaca Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 391
jonah, odysseus Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
jonah, paul (apostle) Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
jonah, tobiah Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
journey, in odyssey Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
julian (emperor) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17
longinus Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17
marriage, arranged in heaven Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
marriage, endogamic Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
matter (materiality) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 390
memory Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 383
nostos, νόστος, return home, tobiah Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
odysseus Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 204; Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17, 379, 383, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391
odyssey Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17, 388
pagan / paganism Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17
paris Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 387
passions (pathe) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389
patroclus Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389
phaeacians Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 379, 390
philosophic life Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 204
plutarch of chaeronea Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 387
politics Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17
poseidon Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 379, 390
prayer Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 387, 388, 389, 390, 391
proclus (neoplatonist) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17, 379, 383, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391
quotation, marking of quotations Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 383, 388
quotation Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 379, 383, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391
rages Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
reader / readership Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17, 383, 387, 389
refraining from injustice' Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 204
rhetoric Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17
scheria Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17, 379, 388
sea, as metaphor for becoming / materiality Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 387
sea Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 379, 389, 390, 391
soul, immortality of the soul Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389
soul, wandering of the soul Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17, 383, 387, 390
student Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17
telemachus (hero) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 391
theology, platonic theology Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17
theseus Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 204
theurgy / theurgic Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 387, 389
twists, turns, in odyssey Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 49
weaving Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 17
winds Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389