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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 4.612-4.617
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δώσω τοι κρητῆρα τετυγμένον· ἀργύρεος δὲI'll give you a well-crafted mixing bowl. The whole thing's silver, and the rim is finished with gold, a work of Hephaestus. The hero Phaedimus, the Sidonian king, gave it to me when his house sheltered me there on my return, and I want to send it with you.”
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.234-6.236, 9.120-9.157, 14.292-14.296 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.234. /and many Achaeans again for thee to slay whomsoever thou canst. And let us make exchange of armour, each with the other, that these men too may know that we declare ourselves to be friends from our fathers' days. When they had thus spoken, the twain leapt down from their chariots and clasped each other's hands and pledged their faith. And then from Glaucus did Zeus, son of Cronos, take away his wit 6.235. /seeing he made exchange of armour with Diomedes, son of Tydeus, giving golden for bronze, the worth of an hundred oxen for the worth of nine.But when Hector was come to the Scaean gate and the oak-tree, round about him came running the wives and daughters of the Trojans asking of their sons and brethren and friends 6.236. /seeing he made exchange of armour with Diomedes, son of Tydeus, giving golden for bronze, the worth of an hundred oxen for the worth of nine.But when Hector was come to the Scaean gate and the oak-tree, round about him came running the wives and daughters of the Trojans asking of their sons and brethren and friends 9.120. /I am minded to make amends and to give requital past counting. In the midst of you all let me name the glorious gifts; seven tripods that the fire hath not touched, and ten talents of gold and twenty gleaming cauldrons, and twelve strong horses, winners in the race, that have won prizes by their fleetness. 9.121. /I am minded to make amends and to give requital past counting. In the midst of you all let me name the glorious gifts; seven tripods that the fire hath not touched, and ten talents of gold and twenty gleaming cauldrons, and twelve strong horses, winners in the race, that have won prizes by their fleetness. 9.122. /I am minded to make amends and to give requital past counting. In the midst of you all let me name the glorious gifts; seven tripods that the fire hath not touched, and ten talents of gold and twenty gleaming cauldrons, and twelve strong horses, winners in the race, that have won prizes by their fleetness. 9.123. /I am minded to make amends and to give requital past counting. In the midst of you all let me name the glorious gifts; seven tripods that the fire hath not touched, and ten talents of gold and twenty gleaming cauldrons, and twelve strong horses, winners in the race, that have won prizes by their fleetness. 9.129. /Not without booty were a man, nor unpossessed of precious gold, whoso had wealth as great as the prizes my single-hooved steeds have won me. And I will give seven women skilled in goodly handiwork, women of Lesbos, whom on the day when himself took well-built Lesbos I chose me from out the spoil 9.130. /and that in beauty surpass all women folk. These will I give him, and amid them shall be she that then I took away, the daughter of Briseus; and I will furthermore swear a great oath that never went I up into her bed neither had dalliance with her as is the appointed way of mankind, even of men and women. 9.131. /and that in beauty surpass all women folk. These will I give him, and amid them shall be she that then I took away, the daughter of Briseus; and I will furthermore swear a great oath that never went I up into her bed neither had dalliance with her as is the appointed way of mankind, even of men and women. 9.132. /and that in beauty surpass all women folk. These will I give him, and amid them shall be she that then I took away, the daughter of Briseus; and I will furthermore swear a great oath that never went I up into her bed neither had dalliance with her as is the appointed way of mankind, even of men and women. 9.133. /and that in beauty surpass all women folk. These will I give him, and amid them shall be she that then I took away, the daughter of Briseus; and I will furthermore swear a great oath that never went I up into her bed neither had dalliance with her as is the appointed way of mankind, even of men and women. 9.134. /and that in beauty surpass all women folk. These will I give him, and amid them shall be she that then I took away, the daughter of Briseus; and I will furthermore swear a great oath that never went I up into her bed neither had dalliance with her as is the appointed way of mankind, even of men and women. 9.143. /that be fairest after Argive Helen. And if we return to Achaean Argos, the richest of lands, he shall be my son, and I will honour him even as Orestes that is reared in all abundance, my son well-beloved. Three daughters have I in my well-builded hall 9.144. /that be fairest after Argive Helen. And if we return to Achaean Argos, the richest of lands, he shall be my son, and I will honour him even as Orestes that is reared in all abundance, my son well-beloved. Three daughters have I in my well-builded hall 9.145. /Chrysothemis, and Laodice, and Iphianassa; of these let him lead to the house of Peleus which one he will, without gifts of wooing, and I will furthermore give a dower full rich, such as no man ever yet gave with his daughter. And seven well-peopled cities will I give him 9.146. /Chrysothemis, and Laodice, and Iphianassa; of these let him lead to the house of Peleus which one he will, without gifts of wooing, and I will furthermore give a dower full rich, such as no man ever yet gave with his daughter. And seven well-peopled cities will I give him 9.147. /Chrysothemis, and Laodice, and Iphianassa; of these let him lead to the house of Peleus which one he will, without gifts of wooing, and I will furthermore give a dower full rich, such as no man ever yet gave with his daughter. And seven well-peopled cities will I give him 9.148. /Chrysothemis, and Laodice, and Iphianassa; of these let him lead to the house of Peleus which one he will, without gifts of wooing, and I will furthermore give a dower full rich, such as no man ever yet gave with his daughter. And seven well-peopled cities will I give him 9.149. /Chrysothemis, and Laodice, and Iphianassa; of these let him lead to the house of Peleus which one he will, without gifts of wooing, and I will furthermore give a dower full rich, such as no man ever yet gave with his daughter. And seven well-peopled cities will I give him 9.150. /Cardamyle Enope, and grassy Hire, and sacred Pherae and Antheia with deep meadows, and fair Aepeia and vine-clad Pedasus. All are nigh to the sea, on the uttermost border of sandy Pylos, and in them dwell men rich in flocks and rich in kine 9.151. /Cardamyle Enope, and grassy Hire, and sacred Pherae and Antheia with deep meadows, and fair Aepeia and vine-clad Pedasus. All are nigh to the sea, on the uttermost border of sandy Pylos, and in them dwell men rich in flocks and rich in kine 9.152. /Cardamyle Enope, and grassy Hire, and sacred Pherae and Antheia with deep meadows, and fair Aepeia and vine-clad Pedasus. All are nigh to the sea, on the uttermost border of sandy Pylos, and in them dwell men rich in flocks and rich in kine 9.153. /Cardamyle Enope, and grassy Hire, and sacred Pherae and Antheia with deep meadows, and fair Aepeia and vine-clad Pedasus. All are nigh to the sea, on the uttermost border of sandy Pylos, and in them dwell men rich in flocks and rich in kine 9.154. /Cardamyle Enope, and grassy Hire, and sacred Pherae and Antheia with deep meadows, and fair Aepeia and vine-clad Pedasus. All are nigh to the sea, on the uttermost border of sandy Pylos, and in them dwell men rich in flocks and rich in kine 9.155. /men that shall honour him with gifts as though he were a god, and beneath his sceptre shall bring his ordices to prosperous fulfillment. All this will I bring to pass for him, if he but cease from his wrath. Let him yield—Hades, I ween, is not to be soothed, neither overcome, wherefore he is most hated by mortals of all gods. 9.156. /men that shall honour him with gifts as though he were a god, and beneath his sceptre shall bring his ordices to prosperous fulfillment. All this will I bring to pass for him, if he but cease from his wrath. Let him yield—Hades, I ween, is not to be soothed, neither overcome, wherefore he is most hated by mortals of all gods. 9.157. /men that shall honour him with gifts as though he were a god, and beneath his sceptre shall bring his ordices to prosperous fulfillment. All this will I bring to pass for him, if he but cease from his wrath. Let him yield—Hades, I ween, is not to be soothed, neither overcome, wherefore he is most hated by mortals of all gods. 14.292. /in the likeness of a clear-voiced mountain bird, that the gods call Chalcis, and men Cymindis.But Hera swiftly drew nigh to topmost Gargarus, the peak of lofty Ida, and Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, beheld her. And when he beheld her, then love encompassed his wise heart about 14.293. /in the likeness of a clear-voiced mountain bird, that the gods call Chalcis, and men Cymindis.But Hera swiftly drew nigh to topmost Gargarus, the peak of lofty Ida, and Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, beheld her. And when he beheld her, then love encompassed his wise heart about 14.294. /in the likeness of a clear-voiced mountain bird, that the gods call Chalcis, and men Cymindis.But Hera swiftly drew nigh to topmost Gargarus, the peak of lofty Ida, and Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, beheld her. And when he beheld her, then love encompassed his wise heart about 14.295. /even as when at the first they had gone to the couch and had dalliance together in love, their dear parents knowing naught thereof. And he stood before her, and spake, and addressed her:Hera, with what desire art thou thus come hither down from Olympus? Lo, thy horses are not at hand, neither thy chariot, whereon thou mightest mount. 14.296. /even as when at the first they had gone to the couch and had dalliance together in love, their dear parents knowing naught thereof. And he stood before her, and spake, and addressed her:Hera, with what desire art thou thus come hither down from Olympus? Lo, thy horses are not at hand, neither thy chariot, whereon thou mightest mount.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 4.589-4.611, 4.613-4.619, 15.75-15.85 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Horace, Odes, 2.16.37 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Horace, Letters, 1.7.22, 1.7.24, 1.7.37-1.7.43 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agriculture Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 205
ainos Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 204, 205
anaphora' Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 293
anaphora Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 294
audience, constructs meaning Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 204, 205
audience, twofold, of the epistles Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 204, 205
fable Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 204, 205
homer, as exemplum in epistle Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205
homer, iliad Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 293, 294
homer, odyssey Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 293, 294
horace, credibility of Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205
horace, strategies of status affiliation Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205
hospitality Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 27
ideology, aristocratic Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 204, 205
keimelion Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 205
kleos Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 204
kurke, leslie Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 205
language, and money Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202
lyne, r.o.a.m. Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 203
maecenas, as odysseus figure Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 203, 204
maecenas, relationship with horace Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205
money, and linguistic tropes Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205
money, lupini Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205
pindar Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 205
rhetoric, of money Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205
sabine farm, the, as ithaca Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 204
status, and horatian strategies of affiliation Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205
symbolic capital, of maecenas Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 204
xenia Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205; Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 27