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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 4.590-4.604


τρεῖς ἵππους καὶ δίφρον ἐύξοον· αὐτὰρ ἔπειταthree horses and a well-polished chariot. Then afterward I'll give you a beautiful chalice, so you can make libation to the gods immortal and all your days remember me.” Astute Telemachus said back to him in turn: “Atreides, don't keep me here a long time
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καὶ γάρ κʼ εἰς ἐνιαυτὸν ἐγὼ παρὰ σοί γʼ ἀνεχοίμηνeven though I'd be content to sit beside you for a year and longing for either home or parents wouldn't seize me, since I terribly enjoy hearing your stories and your words. But by now my comrades are becoming impatient in sacred Pylos, and you do keep me here a while.
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δῶρον δʼ ὅττι κέ μοι δοίης, κειμήλιον ἔστω·Whatever gift you'd give me, let it be one to be treasured. I won't take the horses to Ithaca, but I'll leave them here for you yourself, as honors, for you rule over a wide plain in which is much lotus and galingale and wheat and spelt and broad-eared white barley.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.234-6.236, 9.120-9.157 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.234. /and many Achaeans again for thee to slay whomsoever thou canst. And let us make exchange of armour, each with the other, that these men too may know that we declare ourselves to be friends from our fathers' days. When they had thus spoken, the twain leapt down from their chariots and clasped each other's hands and pledged their faith. And then from Glaucus did Zeus, son of Cronos, take away his wit 6.235. /seeing he made exchange of armour with Diomedes, son of Tydeus, giving golden for bronze, the worth of an hundred oxen for the worth of nine.But when Hector was come to the Scaean gate and the oak-tree, round about him came running the wives and daughters of the Trojans asking of their sons and brethren and friends 6.236. /seeing he made exchange of armour with Diomedes, son of Tydeus, giving golden for bronze, the worth of an hundred oxen for the worth of nine.But when Hector was come to the Scaean gate and the oak-tree, round about him came running the wives and daughters of the Trojans asking of their sons and brethren and friends 9.120. /I am minded to make amends and to give requital past counting. In the midst of you all let me name the glorious gifts; seven tripods that the fire hath not touched, and ten talents of gold and twenty gleaming cauldrons, and twelve strong horses, winners in the race, that have won prizes by their fleetness. 9.121. /I am minded to make amends and to give requital past counting. In the midst of you all let me name the glorious gifts; seven tripods that the fire hath not touched, and ten talents of gold and twenty gleaming cauldrons, and twelve strong horses, winners in the race, that have won prizes by their fleetness. 9.122. /I am minded to make amends and to give requital past counting. In the midst of you all let me name the glorious gifts; seven tripods that the fire hath not touched, and ten talents of gold and twenty gleaming cauldrons, and twelve strong horses, winners in the race, that have won prizes by their fleetness. 9.123. /I am minded to make amends and to give requital past counting. In the midst of you all let me name the glorious gifts; seven tripods that the fire hath not touched, and ten talents of gold and twenty gleaming cauldrons, and twelve strong horses, winners in the race, that have won prizes by their fleetness. 9.129. /Not without booty were a man, nor unpossessed of precious gold, whoso had wealth as great as the prizes my single-hooved steeds have won me. And I will give seven women skilled in goodly handiwork, women of Lesbos, whom on the day when himself took well-built Lesbos I chose me from out the spoil 9.130. /and that in beauty surpass all women folk. These will I give him, and amid them shall be she that then I took away, the daughter of Briseus; and I will furthermore swear a great oath that never went I up into her bed neither had dalliance with her as is the appointed way of mankind, even of men and women. 9.131. /and that in beauty surpass all women folk. These will I give him, and amid them shall be she that then I took away, the daughter of Briseus; and I will furthermore swear a great oath that never went I up into her bed neither had dalliance with her as is the appointed way of mankind, even of men and women. 9.132. /and that in beauty surpass all women folk. These will I give him, and amid them shall be she that then I took away, the daughter of Briseus; and I will furthermore swear a great oath that never went I up into her bed neither had dalliance with her as is the appointed way of mankind, even of men and women. 9.133. /and that in beauty surpass all women folk. These will I give him, and amid them shall be she that then I took away, the daughter of Briseus; and I will furthermore swear a great oath that never went I up into her bed neither had dalliance with her as is the appointed way of mankind, even of men and women. 9.134. /and that in beauty surpass all women folk. These will I give him, and amid them shall be she that then I took away, the daughter of Briseus; and I will furthermore swear a great oath that never went I up into her bed neither had dalliance with her as is the appointed way of mankind, even of men and women. 9.143. /that be fairest after Argive Helen. And if we return to Achaean Argos, the richest of lands, he shall be my son, and I will honour him even as Orestes that is reared in all abundance, my son well-beloved. Three daughters have I in my well-builded hall 9.144. /that be fairest after Argive Helen. And if we return to Achaean Argos, the richest of lands, he shall be my son, and I will honour him even as Orestes that is reared in all abundance, my son well-beloved. Three daughters have I in my well-builded hall 9.145. /Chrysothemis, and Laodice, and Iphianassa; of these let him lead to the house of Peleus which one he will, without gifts of wooing, and I will furthermore give a dower full rich, such as no man ever yet gave with his daughter. And seven well-peopled cities will I give him 9.146. /Chrysothemis, and Laodice, and Iphianassa; of these let him lead to the house of Peleus which one he will, without gifts of wooing, and I will furthermore give a dower full rich, such as no man ever yet gave with his daughter. And seven well-peopled cities will I give him 9.147. /Chrysothemis, and Laodice, and Iphianassa; of these let him lead to the house of Peleus which one he will, without gifts of wooing, and I will furthermore give a dower full rich, such as no man ever yet gave with his daughter. And seven well-peopled cities will I give him 9.148. /Chrysothemis, and Laodice, and Iphianassa; of these let him lead to the house of Peleus which one he will, without gifts of wooing, and I will furthermore give a dower full rich, such as no man ever yet gave with his daughter. And seven well-peopled cities will I give him 9.149. /Chrysothemis, and Laodice, and Iphianassa; of these let him lead to the house of Peleus which one he will, without gifts of wooing, and I will furthermore give a dower full rich, such as no man ever yet gave with his daughter. And seven well-peopled cities will I give him 9.150. /Cardamyle Enope, and grassy Hire, and sacred Pherae and Antheia with deep meadows, and fair Aepeia and vine-clad Pedasus. All are nigh to the sea, on the uttermost border of sandy Pylos, and in them dwell men rich in flocks and rich in kine 9.151. /Cardamyle Enope, and grassy Hire, and sacred Pherae and Antheia with deep meadows, and fair Aepeia and vine-clad Pedasus. All are nigh to the sea, on the uttermost border of sandy Pylos, and in them dwell men rich in flocks and rich in kine 9.152. /Cardamyle Enope, and grassy Hire, and sacred Pherae and Antheia with deep meadows, and fair Aepeia and vine-clad Pedasus. All are nigh to the sea, on the uttermost border of sandy Pylos, and in them dwell men rich in flocks and rich in kine 9.153. /Cardamyle Enope, and grassy Hire, and sacred Pherae and Antheia with deep meadows, and fair Aepeia and vine-clad Pedasus. All are nigh to the sea, on the uttermost border of sandy Pylos, and in them dwell men rich in flocks and rich in kine 9.154. /Cardamyle Enope, and grassy Hire, and sacred Pherae and Antheia with deep meadows, and fair Aepeia and vine-clad Pedasus. All are nigh to the sea, on the uttermost border of sandy Pylos, and in them dwell men rich in flocks and rich in kine 9.155. /men that shall honour him with gifts as though he were a god, and beneath his sceptre shall bring his ordices to prosperous fulfillment. All this will I bring to pass for him, if he but cease from his wrath. Let him yield—Hades, I ween, is not to be soothed, neither overcome, wherefore he is most hated by mortals of all gods. 9.156. /men that shall honour him with gifts as though he were a god, and beneath his sceptre shall bring his ordices to prosperous fulfillment. All this will I bring to pass for him, if he but cease from his wrath. Let him yield—Hades, I ween, is not to be soothed, neither overcome, wherefore he is most hated by mortals of all gods. 9.157. /men that shall honour him with gifts as though he were a god, and beneath his sceptre shall bring his ordices to prosperous fulfillment. All this will I bring to pass for him, if he but cease from his wrath. Let him yield—Hades, I ween, is not to be soothed, neither overcome, wherefore he is most hated by mortals of all gods.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 4.332-4.589, 4.591-4.619, 8.457-8.468, 15.125-15.126, 24.537-24.538 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.896-1.897, 3.1013-3.1014, 3.1107-3.1108 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.896. μνώεο μὴν ἀπεών περ ὁμῶς καὶ νόστιμος ἤδη 1.897. Ὑψιπύλης· λίπε δʼ ἧμιν ἔπος, τό κεν ἐξανύσαιμι 3.1013. προπρὸ δʼ ἀφειδήσασα θυώδεος ἔξελε μίτρης 3.1014. φάρμακον· αὐτὰρ ὅγʼ αἶψα χεροῖν ὑπέδεκτο γεγηθώς. 3.1107. Μίνω Πασιφάης πόσιν ἔμμεναι· οὐδʼ Ἀριάδνῃ 3.1108. ἰσοῦμαι· τῶ μήτι φιλοξενίην ἀγόρευε.
4. Horace, Odes, 2.16.37 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Horace, Letters, 1.7.22, 1.7.24, 1.7.37-1.7.43 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Lucan, Pharsalia, 8.132-8.133, 10.543-10.546 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Quintus Smyrnaeus, Posthomerica, 14.121-14.142, 14.559-14.589, 14.654-14.656



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agriculture Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 205
ainos Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 204, 205
ajax (locrian) Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 340
anaphora Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 293
anchoring allusions Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 215, 216
audience, constructs meaning Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 204, 205
audience, twofold, of the epistles Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 204, 205
caesar, julius, as anti-odyssean Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 215, 216
cameron, alan Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 87, 340
capitoline tablet Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 340
closure Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 340
counterfactuals Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 340
ennius Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 340
epic Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 158
ethopoeia Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 87
exempla Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 158
fable Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 204, 205
harder, m. annette Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 340
helen Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 158
homer, as exemplum in epistle Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205
homer, iliad Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 293
homer, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 215, 216
homer, odyssey Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 87; Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 293
horace, credibility of Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205
horace, strategies of status affiliation Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205
hospitality Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 27
hypsipyle Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 158
ideology, aristocratic Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 204, 205
jason Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 158
keimelion Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 205
kleos Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 204
kurke, leslie Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 205
language, and money Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202
lucian Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 87
lyne, r.o.a.m. Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 203
maecenas, as odysseus figure Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 203, 204
maecenas, relationship with horace Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205
medea Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 158
memory, commemoration Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 158
money, and linguistic tropes Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205
money, lupini Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205
narrator, narratorial role Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 158
nausicaa Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 158
nestor, song Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 87
nostos, as master-trope explored by lucan' Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 216
nostos, as master-trope explored by lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 215
odysseus Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 215, 216
odyssey, and the ending of posthomerica Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 340
performance, internal Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 87
pindar Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 205
political context Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 340
pompey Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 215
rhetoric, of money Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205
sabine farm, the, as ithaca Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 204
songs, death and funeral of achilles Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 87
songs, nestors Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 87
songs, within songs Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 87
status, and horatian strategies of affiliation Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205
storm scenes, ending Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 340
symbolic capital, of maecenas Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 204
temporality, closure Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 340
virgil Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 216
xenia Bowditch, Cicero on the Philosophy of Religion: On the Nature of the Gods and On Divination (2001) 202, 203, 204, 205; Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 27