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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 4.219-4.226
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αὐτίκʼ ἄρʼ εἰς οἶνον βάλε φάρμακον, ἔνθεν ἔπινονand immediately threw a drug into the wine which they were drinking, a drug that relieves pain, calms anger, and makes one forget all evils. He who swallowed it, once it was mixed in the mixing bowl, would not throughout the day let tears fall from his cheeks, not if his mother and his father died
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οὐδʼ εἴ οἱ προπάροιθεν ἀδελφεὸν ἢ φίλον υἱὸνnot if in front of him they cleaved with bronze his brother or beloved son and he saw it with his eyes. Zeus's daughter had such helpful drugs, good ones that an Egyptian, Thonus' wife Polydamna, gave her. There grain-giving farmland bears drugs greatest in number
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.344 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.344. /But come now, tarry a while, let me don my harness of war; or go thy way, and I will follow; and methinks I shall overtake thee. So said he, and Hector of the flashing helm answered him not a word, but unto him spake Helen with gentle words:O Brother of me that am a dog, a contriver of mischief and abhorred of all
2. Homer, Odyssey, 4.1-4.14, 4.17, 4.20-4.36, 4.43-4.54, 4.60-4.61, 4.71-4.76, 4.83-4.85, 4.91-4.92, 4.102-4.103, 4.107, 4.112-4.113, 4.117-4.122, 4.138-4.146, 4.149-4.150, 4.220-4.289, 9.1-9.15 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aristophanes, Clouds, 747-757, 746 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

746. ὦ Σωκρατίδιον φίλτατον. τί ὦ γέρον;
4. Gorgias of Leontini, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Gorgias Atheniensis, Fragments, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 30.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Plutarch, Table Talk, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Lucian, A True Story, 2.14-2.15 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 3.15 (2nd cent. CE

3.15. APOLLONIUS himself describes the character of these sages and of their settlement upon the hill; for in one of his addresses to the Egyptians he says, I saw Indian Brahmans living upon the earth and yet not on it, and fortified without fortifications, and possessing nothing, yet having the riches of all men. He may indeed be thought to have here written with too much subtlety; but we have anyhow the account of Damis to effect that they made a practice of sleeping the ground, and that they strewed the ground with such grass as they might themselves prefer; and, what is more, he says that he saw them levitating themselves two cubits high from the ground, not for the sake of miraculous display, for they disdain any such ambition; but they regard any rites they perform, in thus quitting earth and walking with the Sun, as acts of homage acceptable to the God. Moreover, they neither burn upon an altar nor keep in stoves the fire which they extract from the sun's rays, although it is a material fire; but like the rays of sunlight when they are refracted in water, so this fire is seen raised aloft in the air and dancing in the ether. And further they pray to the Sun who governs the seasons by his might, that the latter may succeed duly in the land, so that India may prosper; but of a night they intreat the ray of light not to take the night amiss, but. to stay with them just as they have brought it down. Such then was the meaning of the phrase of Apollonius, that the Brahmans are upon earth and yet not upon earth. And his phrase fortified without fortifications or walls, refers to the air or vapor under which they bivouac, for though they seem to live in the open air, yet they raise up a shadow and veil themselves in it, so that they are not made wet when it rains and they enjoy the sunlight whenever they choose. And the phrase without possessing anything they had the riches of all men, is thus explained by Damis: All the springs which the Bacchanals see leaping up from the ground under their feet, whenever Dionysus stirs them and earth in a common convulsion, spring up in plenty for these Indians also when they are entertaining or being entertained. Apollonius therefore was right in saying that people provided as they are with all they want offhand and without having prepared anything, possess what they do not possess. And on principle they grow their hair long, as theLacedaemonians did of old and the people of Thurium and Tarentum, as well as the Melians and all who set store by the fashions of Sparta; and they bind a white turban on their heads, and their feet are naked for walking and they cut their garments to resemble the exomis [ 1]. But the material of which they make their raiment is a wool that springs wild from the ground, white like that of the Pamphylians, though it is of softer growth, and a grease like olive oil distills from off it. This is what they make their sacred vesture of, and if anyone else except these Indians tries to pluck it up, the earth refuses to surrender its wool. And they all carry both a ring and a staff of which the peculiar virtues can effect all things, and the one and the other, so we learn, are prized as secrets.
10. Quintus Smyrnaeus, Posthomerica, 13.385-13.402



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agency Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 68
allegory Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 114
aphrodite, menelaus Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 68
apollonius Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
artemis Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 261
astrology Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
beauty, of helen Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 68
beauty, of penthesileia Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 68
brahmans Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
desire Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 128
egypt Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
epicureanism Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 114
erōs' Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 68
gorgias, encomium of helen Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 128
gorgias Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 128
helen, menelaus and Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 68
helen, narratives about Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 128
helen Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
homer Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
india Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
logos, in gorgias Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 128
menelaus Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 68
mesopotamia Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
moon Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
neoplatonism Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
nonnos Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
odysseus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 114
oedipus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
ostanes Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
persia Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
pharmakon Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
philostratus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
plato, performance of dialogues Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 114
plutarch, sympotic questions Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 114
priest Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
sparta Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 68
stesichorus Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 68
stoicism, gnōmai Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 68
symposia, in homer Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 114
symposia Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 114
thessaly Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
truth (alētheia), and desire Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 128
voces magicae Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416
witches Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 416