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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 3.25-3.28


τὸν δʼ αὖτε προσέειπε θεά, γλαυκῶπις Ἀθήνη·Bright-eyed goddess Athena said back to him: “Telemachus, you'll figure out some of this yourself, in your own mind, and a divinity will advise you on the rest, for, no, I don't think that you were born and raised against the will of the gods.” So saying, Pallas Athena led
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9 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.9, 1.36, 1.72, 5.60, 5.62-5.63, 7.37-7.53, 12.195-12.250 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.9. /from the time when first they parted in strife Atreus' son, king of men, and brilliant Achilles.Who then of the gods was it that brought these two together to contend? The son of Leto and Zeus; for he in anger against the king roused throughout the host an evil pestilence, and the people began to perish 1.36. /to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats 1.72. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 5.60. /Harmon's son, whose hands were skilled to fashion all manner of curious work; for Pallas Athene loved him above all men. He it was that had also built for Alexander the shapely ships, source of ills, that were made the bane of all the Trojans and of his own self, seeing he knew not in any wise the oracles of the gods. 5.62. /Harmon's son, whose hands were skilled to fashion all manner of curious work; for Pallas Athene loved him above all men. He it was that had also built for Alexander the shapely ships, source of ills, that were made the bane of all the Trojans and of his own self, seeing he knew not in any wise the oracles of the gods. 5.63. /Harmon's son, whose hands were skilled to fashion all manner of curious work; for Pallas Athene loved him above all men. He it was that had also built for Alexander the shapely ships, source of ills, that were made the bane of all the Trojans and of his own self, seeing he knew not in any wise the oracles of the gods. 7.37. /with this in mind am I myself come from Olympus to the midst of Trojans and Achaeans. But come, how art thou minded to stay the battle of the warriors? Then in answer to her spake king Apollo, son of Zeus:Let us rouse the valiant spirit of horse-taming Hector, in hope that he may challenge some one of the Danaans in single fight 7.38. /with this in mind am I myself come from Olympus to the midst of Trojans and Achaeans. But come, how art thou minded to stay the battle of the warriors? Then in answer to her spake king Apollo, son of Zeus:Let us rouse the valiant spirit of horse-taming Hector, in hope that he may challenge some one of the Danaans in single fight 7.39. /with this in mind am I myself come from Olympus to the midst of Trojans and Achaeans. But come, how art thou minded to stay the battle of the warriors? Then in answer to her spake king Apollo, son of Zeus:Let us rouse the valiant spirit of horse-taming Hector, in hope that he may challenge some one of the Danaans in single fight 7.40. /to do battle with him man to man in dread combat. So shall the bronze-greaved Achaeans have indignation and rouse some one to do battle in single combat against goodly Hector. 7.41. /to do battle with him man to man in dread combat. So shall the bronze-greaved Achaeans have indignation and rouse some one to do battle in single combat against goodly Hector. 7.42. /to do battle with him man to man in dread combat. So shall the bronze-greaved Achaeans have indignation and rouse some one to do battle in single combat against goodly Hector. 7.43. /to do battle with him man to man in dread combat. So shall the bronze-greaved Achaeans have indignation and rouse some one to do battle in single combat against goodly Hector. 7.44. /to do battle with him man to man in dread combat. So shall the bronze-greaved Achaeans have indignation and rouse some one to do battle in single combat against goodly Hector. So he spake, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. And Helenus, the dear son of Priam, understood in spirit 7.45. /this plan that had found pleasure with the gods in council; and he came and stood by Hector's side, and spake to him, saying:Hector, son of Priam, peer of Zeus in counsel, wouldst thou now in anywise hearken unto me? for I am thy brother. Make the Trojans to sit down, and all the Achaeans 7.46. /this plan that had found pleasure with the gods in council; and he came and stood by Hector's side, and spake to him, saying:Hector, son of Priam, peer of Zeus in counsel, wouldst thou now in anywise hearken unto me? for I am thy brother. Make the Trojans to sit down, and all the Achaeans 7.47. /this plan that had found pleasure with the gods in council; and he came and stood by Hector's side, and spake to him, saying:Hector, son of Priam, peer of Zeus in counsel, wouldst thou now in anywise hearken unto me? for I am thy brother. Make the Trojans to sit down, and all the Achaeans 7.48. /this plan that had found pleasure with the gods in council; and he came and stood by Hector's side, and spake to him, saying:Hector, son of Priam, peer of Zeus in counsel, wouldst thou now in anywise hearken unto me? for I am thy brother. Make the Trojans to sit down, and all the Achaeans 7.49. /this plan that had found pleasure with the gods in council; and he came and stood by Hector's side, and spake to him, saying:Hector, son of Priam, peer of Zeus in counsel, wouldst thou now in anywise hearken unto me? for I am thy brother. Make the Trojans to sit down, and all the Achaeans 7.50. /and do thou challenge whoso is best of the Achaeans to do battle with thee man to man in dread combat. Not yet is it thy fate to die and meet thy doom; for thus have I heard the voice of the gods that are for ever. So spake he and Hector rejoiced greatly when he heard his words; 7.51. /and do thou challenge whoso is best of the Achaeans to do battle with thee man to man in dread combat. Not yet is it thy fate to die and meet thy doom; for thus have I heard the voice of the gods that are for ever. So spake he and Hector rejoiced greatly when he heard his words; 7.52. /and do thou challenge whoso is best of the Achaeans to do battle with thee man to man in dread combat. Not yet is it thy fate to die and meet thy doom; for thus have I heard the voice of the gods that are for ever. So spake he and Hector rejoiced greatly when he heard his words; 7.53. /and do thou challenge whoso is best of the Achaeans to do battle with thee man to man in dread combat. Not yet is it thy fate to die and meet thy doom; for thus have I heard the voice of the gods that are for ever. So spake he and Hector rejoiced greatly when he heard his words; 12.195. /While they were stripping from these their shining arms, meanwhile the youths that followed with Polydamas and Hector, even they that were most in number and bravest, and that most were fain to break through the wall and burn the ships with fire, these still tarried in doubt, as they stood by the trench. 12.196. /While they were stripping from these their shining arms, meanwhile the youths that followed with Polydamas and Hector, even they that were most in number and bravest, and that most were fain to break through the wall and burn the ships with fire, these still tarried in doubt, as they stood by the trench. 12.197. /While they were stripping from these their shining arms, meanwhile the youths that followed with Polydamas and Hector, even they that were most in number and bravest, and that most were fain to break through the wall and burn the ships with fire, these still tarried in doubt, as they stood by the trench. 12.198. /While they were stripping from these their shining arms, meanwhile the youths that followed with Polydamas and Hector, even they that were most in number and bravest, and that most were fain to break through the wall and burn the ships with fire, these still tarried in doubt, as they stood by the trench. 12.199. /While they were stripping from these their shining arms, meanwhile the youths that followed with Polydamas and Hector, even they that were most in number and bravest, and that most were fain to break through the wall and burn the ships with fire, these still tarried in doubt, as they stood by the trench. 12.200. /For a bird had come upon them, as they were eager to cross over, an eagle of lofty flight, skirting the host on the left, and in its talons it bore a blood-red, monstrous snake, still alive as if struggling, nor was it yet forgetful of combat, it writhed backward, and smote him that held it on the breast beside the neck 12.201. /For a bird had come upon them, as they were eager to cross over, an eagle of lofty flight, skirting the host on the left, and in its talons it bore a blood-red, monstrous snake, still alive as if struggling, nor was it yet forgetful of combat, it writhed backward, and smote him that held it on the breast beside the neck 12.202. /For a bird had come upon them, as they were eager to cross over, an eagle of lofty flight, skirting the host on the left, and in its talons it bore a blood-red, monstrous snake, still alive as if struggling, nor was it yet forgetful of combat, it writhed backward, and smote him that held it on the breast beside the neck 12.203. /For a bird had come upon them, as they were eager to cross over, an eagle of lofty flight, skirting the host on the left, and in its talons it bore a blood-red, monstrous snake, still alive as if struggling, nor was it yet forgetful of combat, it writhed backward, and smote him that held it on the breast beside the neck 12.204. /For a bird had come upon them, as they were eager to cross over, an eagle of lofty flight, skirting the host on the left, and in its talons it bore a blood-red, monstrous snake, still alive as if struggling, nor was it yet forgetful of combat, it writhed backward, and smote him that held it on the breast beside the neck 12.205. /till the eagle, stung with pain, cast it from him to the ground, and let it fall in the midst of the throng, and himself with a loud cry sped away down the blasts of the wind. And the Trojans shuddered when they saw the writhing snake lying in the midst of them, a portent of Zeus that beareth the aegis. 12.206. /till the eagle, stung with pain, cast it from him to the ground, and let it fall in the midst of the throng, and himself with a loud cry sped away down the blasts of the wind. And the Trojans shuddered when they saw the writhing snake lying in the midst of them, a portent of Zeus that beareth the aegis. 12.207. /till the eagle, stung with pain, cast it from him to the ground, and let it fall in the midst of the throng, and himself with a loud cry sped away down the blasts of the wind. And the Trojans shuddered when they saw the writhing snake lying in the midst of them, a portent of Zeus that beareth the aegis. 12.208. /till the eagle, stung with pain, cast it from him to the ground, and let it fall in the midst of the throng, and himself with a loud cry sped away down the blasts of the wind. And the Trojans shuddered when they saw the writhing snake lying in the midst of them, a portent of Zeus that beareth the aegis. 12.209. /till the eagle, stung with pain, cast it from him to the ground, and let it fall in the midst of the throng, and himself with a loud cry sped away down the blasts of the wind. And the Trojans shuddered when they saw the writhing snake lying in the midst of them, a portent of Zeus that beareth the aegis. 12.210. /Then verily Polydamas drew near, and spake to bold Hector:Hector, ever dost thou rebuke me in the gatherings of the folk, though I give good counsel, since it were indeed unseemly that a man of the people should speak contrariwise to thee, be it in council or in war, but he should ever increase thy might; 12.211. /Then verily Polydamas drew near, and spake to bold Hector:Hector, ever dost thou rebuke me in the gatherings of the folk, though I give good counsel, since it were indeed unseemly that a man of the people should speak contrariwise to thee, be it in council or in war, but he should ever increase thy might; 12.212. /Then verily Polydamas drew near, and spake to bold Hector:Hector, ever dost thou rebuke me in the gatherings of the folk, though I give good counsel, since it were indeed unseemly that a man of the people should speak contrariwise to thee, be it in council or in war, but he should ever increase thy might; 12.213. /Then verily Polydamas drew near, and spake to bold Hector:Hector, ever dost thou rebuke me in the gatherings of the folk, though I give good counsel, since it were indeed unseemly that a man of the people should speak contrariwise to thee, be it in council or in war, but he should ever increase thy might; 12.214. /Then verily Polydamas drew near, and spake to bold Hector:Hector, ever dost thou rebuke me in the gatherings of the folk, though I give good counsel, since it were indeed unseemly that a man of the people should speak contrariwise to thee, be it in council or in war, but he should ever increase thy might; 12.215. /yet now will I speak even as seemeth to me to be best. Let us not go forward to fight with the Danaans for the ships. For thus, methinks, will the issue be, seeing that in sooth this bird has come upon the Trojans, as they were eager to cross over, an eagle of lofty flight, skirting the host on the left 12.216. /yet now will I speak even as seemeth to me to be best. Let us not go forward to fight with the Danaans for the ships. For thus, methinks, will the issue be, seeing that in sooth this bird has come upon the Trojans, as they were eager to cross over, an eagle of lofty flight, skirting the host on the left 12.217. /yet now will I speak even as seemeth to me to be best. Let us not go forward to fight with the Danaans for the ships. For thus, methinks, will the issue be, seeing that in sooth this bird has come upon the Trojans, as they were eager to cross over, an eagle of lofty flight, skirting the host on the left 12.218. /yet now will I speak even as seemeth to me to be best. Let us not go forward to fight with the Danaans for the ships. For thus, methinks, will the issue be, seeing that in sooth this bird has come upon the Trojans, as they were eager to cross over, an eagle of lofty flight, skirting the host on the left 12.219. /yet now will I speak even as seemeth to me to be best. Let us not go forward to fight with the Danaans for the ships. For thus, methinks, will the issue be, seeing that in sooth this bird has come upon the Trojans, as they were eager to cross over, an eagle of lofty flight, skirting the host on the left 12.220. /bearing in his talons a blood-red, monstrous snake, still living, yet straightway let it fall before he reached his own nest, neither finished he his course, to bring and give it to his little ones—even so shall we, though we break the gates and the wall of the Achaeans by our great might, and the Achaeans give way 12.221. /bearing in his talons a blood-red, monstrous snake, still living, yet straightway let it fall before he reached his own nest, neither finished he his course, to bring and give it to his little ones—even so shall we, though we break the gates and the wall of the Achaeans by our great might, and the Achaeans give way 12.222. /bearing in his talons a blood-red, monstrous snake, still living, yet straightway let it fall before he reached his own nest, neither finished he his course, to bring and give it to his little ones—even so shall we, though we break the gates and the wall of the Achaeans by our great might, and the Achaeans give way 12.223. /bearing in his talons a blood-red, monstrous snake, still living, yet straightway let it fall before he reached his own nest, neither finished he his course, to bring and give it to his little ones—even so shall we, though we break the gates and the wall of the Achaeans by our great might, and the Achaeans give way 12.224. /bearing in his talons a blood-red, monstrous snake, still living, yet straightway let it fall before he reached his own nest, neither finished he his course, to bring and give it to his little ones—even so shall we, though we break the gates and the wall of the Achaeans by our great might, and the Achaeans give way 12.225. /come back over the selfsame road from th ships in disarray; for many of the Trojans shall we leave behind, whom th Achaeans shall slay with the bronze in defense of the ships. On this wise would a soothsayer interpret, one that in his mind had clear knowledge of omens, and to whom the folk gave ear. 12.226. /come back over the selfsame road from th ships in disarray; for many of the Trojans shall we leave behind, whom th Achaeans shall slay with the bronze in defense of the ships. On this wise would a soothsayer interpret, one that in his mind had clear knowledge of omens, and to whom the folk gave ear. 12.227. /come back over the selfsame road from th ships in disarray; for many of the Trojans shall we leave behind, whom th Achaeans shall slay with the bronze in defense of the ships. On this wise would a soothsayer interpret, one that in his mind had clear knowledge of omens, and to whom the folk gave ear. 12.228. /come back over the selfsame road from th ships in disarray; for many of the Trojans shall we leave behind, whom th Achaeans shall slay with the bronze in defense of the ships. On this wise would a soothsayer interpret, one that in his mind had clear knowledge of omens, and to whom the folk gave ear. 12.229. /come back over the selfsame road from th ships in disarray; for many of the Trojans shall we leave behind, whom th Achaeans shall slay with the bronze in defense of the ships. On this wise would a soothsayer interpret, one that in his mind had clear knowledge of omens, and to whom the folk gave ear. 12.230. /Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Polydamas, this that thou sayest is no longer to my pleasure; yea, thou knowest how to devise better words than these. But if thou verily speakest thus in earnest, then of a surety have the gods themselves destroyed thy wits 12.231. /Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Polydamas, this that thou sayest is no longer to my pleasure; yea, thou knowest how to devise better words than these. But if thou verily speakest thus in earnest, then of a surety have the gods themselves destroyed thy wits 12.232. /Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Polydamas, this that thou sayest is no longer to my pleasure; yea, thou knowest how to devise better words than these. But if thou verily speakest thus in earnest, then of a surety have the gods themselves destroyed thy wits 12.233. /Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Polydamas, this that thou sayest is no longer to my pleasure; yea, thou knowest how to devise better words than these. But if thou verily speakest thus in earnest, then of a surety have the gods themselves destroyed thy wits 12.234. /Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Polydamas, this that thou sayest is no longer to my pleasure; yea, thou knowest how to devise better words than these. But if thou verily speakest thus in earnest, then of a surety have the gods themselves destroyed thy wits 12.235. /seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun 12.236. /seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun 12.237. /seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun 12.238. /seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun 12.239. /seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun 12.240. /or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.241. /or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.242. /or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.243. /or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.244. /or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.245. /For if the rest of us be slain one and all at the ships of the Argives, yet is there no fear that thou shouldest perish,—for thy heart is—not staunch in fight nor warlike. Howbeit, if thou shalt hold aloof from battle, or shalt beguile with thy words an other, and turn him from war 12.246. /For if the rest of us be slain one and all at the ships of the Argives, yet is there no fear that thou shouldest perish,—for thy heart is—not staunch in fight nor warlike. Howbeit, if thou shalt hold aloof from battle, or shalt beguile with thy words an other, and turn him from war 12.247. /For if the rest of us be slain one and all at the ships of the Argives, yet is there no fear that thou shouldest perish,—for thy heart is—not staunch in fight nor warlike. Howbeit, if thou shalt hold aloof from battle, or shalt beguile with thy words an other, and turn him from war 12.248. /For if the rest of us be slain one and all at the ships of the Argives, yet is there no fear that thou shouldest perish,—for thy heart is—not staunch in fight nor warlike. Howbeit, if thou shalt hold aloof from battle, or shalt beguile with thy words an other, and turn him from war 12.249. /For if the rest of us be slain one and all at the ships of the Argives, yet is there no fear that thou shouldest perish,—for thy heart is—not staunch in fight nor warlike. Howbeit, if thou shalt hold aloof from battle, or shalt beguile with thy words an other, and turn him from war 12.250. /forthwith smitten by my spear shalt thou lose thy life. So spake he and led the way; and they followed after with a wondrous din; and thereat Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, roused from the mountains of Ida a blast of wind, that bare the dust straight against the ships and he bewildered the mind of the Achaeans, but vouchsafed glory to the Trojans and to Hector. Trusting therefore in his portents and in their might they sought to break the great wall of the Achaeans. The pinnets of the fortifications they dragged down and overthrew the battlements, and pried out the supporting beams that the Achaeans had set
2. Homer, Odyssey, 2.157-2.176, 3.1-3.2, 3.4-3.24, 3.26-3.66, 3.70-3.71, 3.73-3.74, 3.98-3.101, 3.103-3.104, 3.109-3.111, 3.123-3.125, 3.130-3.166, 10.46-10.76, 12.1-12.7, 12.9-12.15, 12.18-12.20, 12.25-12.36, 12.431-12.446 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Herodotus, Histories, 2.181 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.181. Amasis made friends and allies of the people of Cyrene . And he decided to marry from there, either because he had his heart set on a Greek wife, or for the sake of the Corcyreans' friendship; ,in any case, he married a certain Ladice, said by some to be the daughter of Battus, of Arcesilaus by others, and by others again of Critobulus, an esteemed citizen of the place. But whenever Amasis lay with her, he became unable to have intercourse, though he managed with every other woman; ,and when this happened repeatedly, Amasis said to the woman called Ladice, “Woman, you have cast a spell on me, and there is no way that you shall avoid perishing the most wretchedly of all women.” ,So Ladice, when the king did not relent at all although she denied it, vowed in her heart to Aphrodite that, if Amasis could have intercourse with her that night, since that would remedy the problem, she would send a statue to Cyrene to her. And after the prayer, immediately, Amasis did have intercourse with her. And whenever Amasis came to her thereafter, he had intercourse, and he was very fond of her after this. ,Ladice paid her vow to the goddess; she had an image made and sent it to Cyrene, where it stood safe until my time, facing outside the city. Cambyses, when he had conquered Egypt and learned who Ladice was, sent her away to Cyrene unharmed.
4. Plato, Euthyphro, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4c. Naxos, he was working there on our land. Now he got drunk, got angry with one of our house slaves, and butchered him. So my father bound him hand and foot, threw him into a ditch, and sent a man here to Athens to ask the religious adviser what he ought
5. Sophocles, Antigone, 1059, 992-993, 1058 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 285-286, 284 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 4.31.7-4.31.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.31.7. By Damophon too is the so-called Laphria at Messene . The cult came to be established among them in the following way: Among the people of Calydon, Artemis, who was worshipped by them above all the gods, had the title Laphria, and the Messenians who received Naupactus from the Athenians, being at that time close neighbors of the Aetolians, adopted her from the people of Calydon. I will describe her appearance in another place. Paus. 7.18.8 The name Laphria spread only to the Messenians and to the Achaeans of Patrae . 4.31.8. But all cities worship Artemis of Ephesus, and individuals hold her in honor above all the gods. The reason, in my view, is the renown of the Amazons, who traditionally dedicated the image, also the extreme antiquity of this sanctuary. Three other points as well have contributed to her renown, the size of the temple, surpassing all buildings among men, the eminence of the city of the Ephesians and the renown of the goddess who dwells there.
8. Epigraphy, Lsam, 50

9. Epigraphy, Lss, 20.17-20.23



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles (mythological hero) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 162
agamemnon Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 3
amasis ii (pharaoh) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
aphrodite (goddess, aka mylitta, ailat, mitra) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
apollo (god), sanctuary at delos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
apollo (god), sanctuary at didyma Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 265
artemis (goddess), laphria festival Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
athena Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 3
athens, asembly Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
birds, divination Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 162
birds, sacrificial victims Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
bremmer, jan n. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
burkert, walter Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
callimachus, and presentation of the divine Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 248
chaniotis, angelos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 265
chankowski, andrzej s. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 265
chios Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
clan/kinship group (genos) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
communal religion Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 265
corrupted nostos Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 3
cultic ritual practice, feasting Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 265
cultic ritual practice, processions Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 265
cultural memory, oracles and divination Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
cultural memory, social cohesion and identity Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 265
cultural memory Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 265
death and the afterlife, funerary speeches Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 265
death and the afterlife, public funerals Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 265
discontinuity, geographical, in aetia, divine action, poets and Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 248
divinities, in work of callimachus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 248
divinities, origins and genealogies of Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 248
epic narrative Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14, 162
euthyphro (religious prophet) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
festivals, laphria Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
festivals, panathenaia Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 265
gods and goddesses, universal and local nature of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
graf, fritz Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 265
herodotos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
hesiod Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 162
homer, gods Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 248
homer, iliad Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 248; Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 162
homer, odyssey Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14, 162
hymn '1 to zeus" "758.0_248@hymn '2 to apollo" Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 248
hymn to the muses, gods Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 248
in medias res Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 3
kalydon Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
kirk, g.s. Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 248
krauter, s. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 265
kreon (mythological ruler) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
ladike (wife of amasis ii) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
lampon (seer) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
loraux, nicole Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 265
miletos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 265
myth/mythology, transmission Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 162
myth/mythology Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
naiden, fred Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14, 265
nestor Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 3
odysseus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 3
odysseus (mythological hero) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 162
odyssey Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 3
oedipus (mythological hero) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
oracles, divination Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 162
oracles, use of birds Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 162
oracles Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
past, and present, interaction between Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 248
patras Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
pausanias Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
persian wars Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 265
plato, euthyphro Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
poetry/poetic performance Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
poets, theology Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 248
prayer, greek Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 248
priests (hiereis)/priestesses (hiereiai)/priesthood Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
pylos Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 3
religion/theology, diversity/plurality Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
religious authority, experts (exegetes) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
religious authority, sacred law/prescriptions Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
sacrifice (thysia), animal slaughter Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14, 265
sacrifice (thysia), holocaust sacrifice Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
sacrifice (thysia), laphria festival Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
sacrifice (thysia) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 265
sanctuaries/temples, sacred law/prescriptions' Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
sanctuaries/temples Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
sokolowski, franciszek Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
teiresias (mythological prophet) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 14
telemachus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 3
troy Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 3
underworld Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 3
zeus (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 162