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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 24.211-24.348
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δεῖπνον δʼ αἶψα συῶν ἱερεύσατε ὅς τις ἄριστος·and immediately slaughter for dinner whatever is best of the pigs, but I'll go test our father, whether he'll observe me with his eyes and recognize me or not know one whose been away a long time.” So saying, he gave the slaves his martial battle gear.
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οἱ μὲν ἔπειτα δόμονδε θοῶς κίον, αὐτὰρ ὈδυσσεὺςThen they went quickly to the house, but Odysseuswent closer by, trying the richly-fruited garden. But, when he went down into the great orchard, he found neither Dolius nor any of his slaves or sons, but they'd gone to gather stones for walls to be the garden's fence
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ᾤχοντʼ, αὐτὰρ ὁ τοῖσι γέρων ὁδὸν ἡγεμόνευε.and the old man had led them on their way. He found his father, all alone, in the well-worked garden, digging around a plant. He wore a filthy tunic, a shabby patched one, and had bound patched oxhide greaves around his shins, to avoid scratches
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χειρῖδάς τʼ ἐπὶ χερσὶ βάτων ἕνεκʼ· αὐτὰρ ὕπερθενand gloves upon his hands because of thorns. Then he had a goatskin hat on his head above him, and was cherishing sorrow. When long-suffering divine Odysseus saw him, weakened by old age and holding great sorrow in his heart, he stood under a tall pear tree and shed tears.
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μερμήριξε δʼ ἔπειτα κατὰ φρένα καὶ κατὰ θυμὸνThen he pondered in his mind and heart whether to embrace and kiss his father, and tell him every thing, how he came and reached his fatherland, or first ask about every thing and test him. This way seemed better to him as he thought about it
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πρῶτον κερτομίοις ἐπέεσσιν πειρηθῆναι.to test him first with mocking speech. With this in mind, divine Odysseus went straight to him. Yes indeed, he had his head down, digging round a plant, and his brilliant son stood by his side and said to him: “Old man, lack of skill in tending to an orchard doesn't hold you
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ὄρχατον, ἀλλʼ εὖ τοι κομιδὴ ἔχει, οὐδέ τι πάμπανbut your care is good, and not in any way at all, no plant, no fig tree, no vine, no olive tree, no pear tree, no plot of yours, is without care throughout the garden. I'll tell you another thing, but don't put anger in your heart, good care doesn't hold you, yourself, but you hold old age
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λυγρὸν ἔχεις αὐχμεῖς τε κακῶς καὶ ἀεικέα ἕσσαι.a wretched one, in squalor, dressed disgracefully and foully. It's not because of idleness your master doesn't care for you, and, to look at you, it doesn't seem at all you're like a slave in form and stature, since you look like a man who's a king, like such a one who, when he's bathed and eaten
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εὑδέμεναι μαλακῶς· ἡ γὰρ δίκη ἐστὶ γερόντων.leeps softly, for this is the right of old men. But come, tell me this, and recount it exactly. What man's slave are you? Whose orchard do you tend? And tell me this truly, so I'll know it well, if truly this is Ithaca we've come to, as he told me
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οὗτος ἀνὴρ νῦν δὴ ξυμβλήμενος ἐνθάδʼ ἰόντιthat man who just now met me on my way here, not at all very sound of mind, since he didn't dare tell me every thing and didn't listen to my words, when I asked about a guest-friend of mine, whether by chance he's alive and he's here or is already dead and in the house of Hades.
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ἐκ γάρ τοι ἐρέω, σὺ δὲ σύνθεο καί μευ ἄκουσον·For I declare this to you, and you must heed and hear me, I welcomed as a guest in my dear fatherland, once upon a time, a man who'd come to our place, and no one, no other mortal, of strangers from far away, ever came to my home more welcome. He claimed he was from Ithaca by birth, then said
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Λαέρτην Ἀρκεισιάδην πατέρʼ ἔμμεναι αὐτῷ.Laertes Arcesiades was his father. I brought him to our home and entertained him well, welcoming him kindly from the plenty there was throughout our house. And I gave him gifts, guest-gifts, the kind that were fitting. I gave him seven talents of well-wrought gold
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δῶκα δέ οἱ κρητῆρα πανάργυρον ἀνθεμόενταthen gave him a solid-silver mixing bowl, with flowers on it, then twelve single cloaks, and as many blankets, and as many beautiful wide cloaks, and as many tunics besides them, and, further, aside from this, women skilled in noble works, four good-looking ones, whom he wished to choose himself.”
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τὸν δʼ ἠμείβετʼ ἔπειτα πατὴρ κατὰ δάκρυον εἴβων·Then, shedding tears, his father answered him: “Yes indeed, stranger, you've reached the land you asked of, but wanton and wicked men hold it. The gifts are worthless, these you graced him with and countlessly gave. Why, if you'd found him in the kingdom of Ithaca, alive
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τῷ κέν σʼ εὖ δώροισιν ἀμειψάμενος ἀπέπεμψεthen he'd have sent you off well, with gifts he gave in exchange and good hospitality, since it's the right of whoever goes first. But come, tell me this, and recount it exactly. What number is the year, when you welcomed that one as your guest, that wretched one, my son, if there ever was one
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δύσμορον; ὅν που τῆλε φίλων καὶ πατρίδος αἴηςmy ill-fated son? Whom, I suppose, far from his native land and loved ones, either fish ate somewhere on the sea, or on the land he became carrion for birds of prey and wild beasts. Neither his mother shrouded him and mourned him, or his father, we who gave birth to him, nor did his richly-dowered wife, discreet Penelope
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κώκυσʼ ἐν λεχέεσσιν ἑὸν πόσιν, ὡς ἐπεῴκειbewail her husband on his bier, as would have been fitting, after she closed his eyes, for that's the gift of honor for the dead. And tell me this truly, so I'll know it well. What man and from where are you? Where are your city and parents? Where does your swift ship stand, that brought you
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ἀντιθέους θʼ ἑτάρους; ἦ ἔμπορος εἰλήλουθαςand your godlike comrades here? Or did you come as a passenger on the ship of another, who put you ashore and went on?” Adroit Odysseus said to him in reply: “Well then, I'll recount all of it to you quite exactly. I'm from Alybas, where I have a splendid house
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υἱὸς Ἀφείδαντος Πολυπημονίδαο ἄνακτος·the son of lord Apheidas Polypemonides, but my name is Eperitus. But a divinity made me wander from Sicania, to come here though I didn't want to, and my ship stands over there, off the country, away from the city. But as for Odysseus, this is by now the fifth year
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ἐξ οὗ κεῖθεν ἔβη καὶ ἐμῆς ἀπελήλυθε πάτρηςfrom when he went from there and left my fatherland, as an ill-fated one. Ah, the birds were good for him when he went, on his right, at which I rejoiced and sent him off, and he rejoiced and left. Our hearts still hoped we'd mix in friendship and he'd give me splendid gifts.”
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ὣς φάτο, τὸν δʼ ἄχεος νεφέλη ἐκάλυψε μέλαινα·So said he, and a black cloud of grief covered Laertes. With both his hands he picked up sooty ashes and poured them down on his gray head, groaning intensely. Odysseus' heart was aroused, and bitter fury rushed up through his nostrils as he beheld his father.
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κύσσε δέ μιν περιφὺς ἐπιάλμενος, ἠδὲ προσηύδα·He leapt at him, embraced him, kissed him, and said to him: “That one is surely this one, father, I myself am the one you search for. I've come, in the twentieth year, to my fatherland. But check your weeping and tearful groaning, for I'll speak out to you, but we really must make haste nonetheless.
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μνηστῆρας κατέπεφνον ἐν ἡμετέροισι δόμοισιI killed the suitors in our palace and avenged their evil deeds and heartaching outrage.” Laertes answered him back and said: “If you've at last come back here as my son Odysseus, tell me some sign now, a very clear one, so I can believe you.”
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τὸν δʼ ἀπαμειβόμενος προσέφη πολύμητις Ὀδυσσεύς·Adroit Odysseus said to him in reply: “First, look with your eyes at this scar here, that a pig inflicted on me with a white tooth in Parnassuswhen I went there. You and my lady mother sent me to my mother's dear father, Autolycus, so I could get the gift
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δῶρα, τὰ δεῦρο μολών μοι ὑπέσχετο καὶ κατένευσεν.that he promised and nodded yes to when he came here. Or come, let me tell you also of the trees in the well-worked garden, that you gave me once upon a time, and I asked you for every thing, childish as I was, as I followed through the garden. We strolled through the garden, and you named and told me of every one.
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ὄγχνας μοι δῶκας τρισκαίδεκα καὶ δέκα μηλέαςYou gave me thirteen pear trees, and ten apple trees. Forty fig trees. You promised so, to give me fifty vines, and each was one that bore grapes in succession, and there were clusters of all kinds throughout them, whenever Zeus's seasons would fall heavily from above.”
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ὣς φάτο, τοῦ δʼ αὐτοῦ λύτο γούνατα καὶ φίλον ἦτορSo said he, and his knees and dear heart collapsed right where he was, since he knew well that the signs Odysseus showed him were sure ones. He threw his two arms about his beloved son, and long-suffering divine Odysseus held him close to him as he fainted. Then after he caught his breath and his spirit gathered in his chest
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

1 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 1.191-1.192, 1.245-1.247, 14.199-14.206, 15.353-15.354, 18.84-18.87, 19.172-19.184, 20.382-20.383, 23.5-23.79, 23.85-23.87, 23.93-23.95, 23.108-23.110, 23.114-23.115, 23.117-23.122, 23.125-23.126, 23.131-23.217, 23.225-23.240, 24.206-24.207, 24.212-24.348 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
black sea (see also pontus euxinus) Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
circe Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
circeo Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
climax Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 25
corcyra (modern corfu) Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
emotions, grief de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 144
eretria Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
etruscans Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
eubeans Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
father-son relationship, in odyssey Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 25
gibraltar) Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
guest-friendship de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 144
hesiod Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
homer, odysseus, beggar, false/old Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 25
homer, odysseus, family affections Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 25
homer, odysseus, love and adventures Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 25
homer, odysseus, meetings and recognitions Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 25
homer, odyssey, laertes Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 25
homer, odyssey, penelope Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 25
homer, odyssey, suitors Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 25
homer, odyssey, telemachus Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 25
homer, odyssey, themes of plot, home and family affections Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 25
ionian islands Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
italy Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
laertes de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 144
magna graecia (μεγάλη ἑλλάς) Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
naxos Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
nostos, νόστος, return home, odysseus Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 25
odysseus de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 144
old age, old man, laertes Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 25
penelope de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 144
propontis (modern sea of marmara) Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
pythekoussai (modern ischia) Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
recognition, scenes of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 144
sicily Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
spina Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
sybaris Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
syracuse Bianchetti et al., Brill’s Companion to Ancient Geography: The Inhabited World in Greek and Roman Tradition (2015) 29
tears de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 144
wife, odysseus Toloni, The Story of Tobit: A Comparative Literary Analysis (2022) 25
women, perspective of' de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 144