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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 24.199
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 49, 48 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

48. One’s rudder packed away, live lazily
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 126-127, 129, 131-133, 139, 166, 168, 172, 180-181, 217, 233, 309, 313, 334, 340, 368, 385, 406, 460, 509, 886-893, 904, 914, 928, 969, 978, 1018 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1018. For he was fearful that she just might bear
3. Homer, Iliad, 6.358, 7.478, 23.62-23.107 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.358. /my brother, since above all others has trouble encompassed thy heart because of shameless me, and the folly of Alexander; on whom Zeus hath brought an evil doom, that even in days to come we may be a song for men that are yet to be. Then made answer to her great Hector of the flashing helm: 7.478. /and some for slaves; and they made them a rich feast. So the whole night through the long-haired Achaeans feasted, and the Trojans likewise in the city, and their allies; and all night long Zeus, the counsellor, devised them evil, thundering in terrible wise. Then pale fear gat hold of them 23.62. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.63. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.64. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.65. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.66. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.67. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.68. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.69. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.70. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.71. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.72. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.73. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.74. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.75. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.76. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.77. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.78. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.79. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.80. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.81. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.82. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.83. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.84. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.85. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.86. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.87. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.88. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.89. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.90. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.91. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.92. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.93. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.94. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. Then in answer spake to him Achilles, swift of foot:Wherefore, O head beloved, art thou come hither 23.95. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.96. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.97. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.98. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.99. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.100. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.101. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.102. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.103. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.104. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.105. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them 23.106. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them 23.107. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them
4. Homer, Odyssey, 3.261, 11.97-11.137, 11.235-11.259, 14.243, 23.296, 24.1-24.198, 24.200-24.204, 24.444 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5. Homeric Hymns, To Hermes, 407-572, 406 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

406. Your growing’s almost at its utmost length.”
6. Euripides, Helen, 17 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Σπάρτη, πατὴρ δὲ Τυνδάρεως: ἔστιν δὲ δὴ
7. Euripides, Orestes, 540-541, 1691 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1691. Greatly revered Victory, may you occupy my life, and never cease to crown me!
8. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

62b. but perhaps there is some reason in it. Now the doctrine that is taught in secret about this matter, that we men are in a kind of prison and must not set ourselves free or run away, seems to me to be weighty and not easy to understand. But this at least, Cebes, I do believe is sound, that the gods are our guardians and that we men are one of the chattels of the gods. Do you not believe this? Yes, said Cebes
9. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

614b. ince there are not many things to which I would more gladly listen. It is not, let me tell you, said I, the tale to Alcinous told that I shall unfold, but the tale of a warrior bold, Er, the son of Armenius, by race a Pamphylian. He once upon a time was slain in battle, and when the corpses were taken up on the tenth day already decayed, was found intact, and having been brought home, at the moment of his funeral, on the twelfth day as he lay upon the pyre, revived, and after coming to life related what, he said, he had seen in the world beyond. He said that when his soul went forth from his body he journeyed with a great company
10. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 17-18, 16



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, death/immortality and Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
affinity argument Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 98
agamemnon Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
agnosticism Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 98
apollo, and hermes Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 347
apollodorus, and tyro Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 605
aristarchus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 347
aristophanes, frogs König, Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture (2012) 43
aristotle de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
audience de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
authorial comment de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
cicero, dream of scipio König, Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture (2012) 43
clytemnestra Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
comedy, classical athenian König, Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture (2012) 43
cosmogony Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
cronus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
death and temporality, human desire for glory (kleos) in greco-roman literature Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
death and temporality, in homer Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
death and temporality Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
derveni poet Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
dionysus König, Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture (2012) 43
earth Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
eidōlon Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 7
emotional restraint, psychology and/of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
emotions, astonishment/surprise de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
emotions, despair de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
emotions, fear (fright) de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
emotions, hope/expectation de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
emotions, joy de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
emotions, pity de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
emotions, pleasure de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
emotions, shame de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
emotions, wonder de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
euripides Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
focalization de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
forms Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 98
fragments, of sophocles works Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 605
gaia Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
godlikeness, platonic Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 98
godlikeness Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 98
gods, births of the gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
greek romance de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
hades, etymology of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 7
hades, realm of Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 7
hades Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 347
hector Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
helen of troy Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
herdsman, and magic Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 347
herdsman, as psychopomp Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 347
hermes, chthonios Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 347
hesiod Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
homer, iliad, death/temporality in Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, death/immortality and Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
homer, odyssey König, Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture (2012) 43; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 347
homer, on death and temporality Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
homer Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 98
hymn to zeus (orphic) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
iliad Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 7
immortality, human desire for glory (kleos) and Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
love and friendship Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 98
lucian, on death and temporality Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
menelaus Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
metanarrative de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
metis Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
mimesis de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
oceanus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
odysseus, death/temporality and Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
odysseus König, Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture (2012) 43
odyssey Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 7
odyssey (homer), and tyro Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 605
orestes (euripides), and tyndareus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 605
pain/suffering de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 644
paris (homeric character) Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
pelias Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 605
penelope (wife of odysseus) Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
plato König, Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture (2012) 43; Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 98
plays, lost Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 605
pontus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
protogonos (orphic god) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
psukhē Shilo, Beyond Death in the Oresteia: Poetics, Ethics, and Politics (2022) 7
rhea Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
selene Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
sidero Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 605
simmias Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 98
socrates, on argument and doubt in platos phaedo Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 98
sophocles, lost plays and fragments of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 605
soul-body relationship, translocation Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 98
swallowing, zeus swallowing of metis Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
swallowing, zeus swallowing of protogonos Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
teiresias Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
tethys Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
thriai Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 347
time Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
tundareos, tyndareus (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 605
turo, tyro (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 605
uranus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
voices of the past' König, Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture (2012) 43
zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
zeus mind Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59