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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 23.295-23.343


ἐς θάλαμον δʼ ἀγαγοῦσα πάλιν κίεν. οἱ μὲν ἔπειταAfter she led them into the chamber she went back. They then gladly went to the place of their bed of old. Then Telemachus, the herdsman, and the swineherd stopped their feet from dancing, then stopped the women, and went to bed themselves throughout the shadowy hall.
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τὼ δʼ ἐπεὶ οὖν φιλότητος ἐταρπήτην ἐρατεινῆςWhen the two had had their full enjoyment of lovely love, they took delight in stories, telling them to one another. She, a woman divine, all that she'd put up with in the palace, as she watched the deadly throng of suitor men, who for her sake cut the throats of many, fat sheep and cattle
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ἔσφαζον, πολλὸς δὲ πίθων ἠφύσσετο οἶνος·and much wine was drawn from the wine jugs. Then Zeus-born Odysseus, all the troubles he'd caused for men, and all he'd suffered in his misery. He told it all. She took delight in listening, and sleep fell not upon her eyelids before he recounted each and every thing.
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ἤρξατο δʼ ὡς πρῶτον Κίκονας δάμασʼ, αὐτὰρ ἔπειταHe began with how he first tamed the Ciconians, then after that he came to the rich land of the Lotus Eater men, and all the Cyclops did, and how he made him pay a blood price for his mighty comrades, whom he'd eaten and not pitied, and how he came to Aeolus, who graciously received
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καὶ πέμπʼ, οὐδέ πω αἶσα φίλην ἐς πατρίδʼ ἱκέσθαιand sent him, but it wasn't yet his destiny to reach his fatherland, but a windstorm snatched him up again and bore him, groaning heavily, upon the fishy deep. and how he reached Laestrygonian Telepylus, where they destroyed his ships and well-greaved comrades
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πάντας· Ὀδυσσεὺς δʼ οἶος ὑπέκφυγε νηῒ μελαίνῃ·all of them, and Odysseus alone escaped with a black ship. And he recounted Circe's guiles and wiliness, and how he went into the moldy house of Hades, to consult with the soul of Teiresias the Theban, in his many-oarlocked ship, and beheld all his comrades
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μητέρα θʼ, ἥ μιν ἔτικτε καὶ ἔτρεφε τυτθὸν ἐόντα·and his mother, who bore him and nursed him when he was little, and how he heard the trilling Sirens' voice, how he came to the Planctae rocks and dread Charybdis, and Scylla, whom men had never ever escaped unharmed, and how his comrades killed the cattle of the Sun
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ἠδʼ ὡς νῆα θοὴν ἔβαλε ψολόεντι κεραυνῷand how high-thundering Zeus struck his swift ship with a smoky thunderbolt, and his good comrades perished, all together, and he himself escaped death's evil agents. How he reached the island of Ogygia and nymph Calypsowho detained him, anxious that he be her husband
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ἐν σπέσσι γλαφυροῖσι, καὶ ἔτρεφεν ἠδὲ ἔφασκεin hollow caves, and cared for him, and promised to make him immortal and ageless all his days, but never persuaded the heart in his chest. And how after much suffering he came to the Phaeacians, who honored him exceedingly in their heart like a god
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καὶ πέμψαν σὺν νηῒ φίλην ἐς πατρίδα γαῖανand sent him with a ship to his beloved fatherland, and gave him bronze, and gold aplenty, and clothing. This was the last word he said, when limb-loosening sweet sleep sprang upon him, and freed cares from his heart. Bright-eyed goddess Athena thought again of other things
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.35-2.40 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.35. /So spoke the Dream, and departed, and left him there, pondering in his heart on things that were not to be brought to pass. For in sooth he deemed that he should take the city of Priam that very day, fool that he was! seeing he knew not what deeds Zeus was purposing 2.36. /So spoke the Dream, and departed, and left him there, pondering in his heart on things that were not to be brought to pass. For in sooth he deemed that he should take the city of Priam that very day, fool that he was! seeing he knew not what deeds Zeus was purposing 2.37. /So spoke the Dream, and departed, and left him there, pondering in his heart on things that were not to be brought to pass. For in sooth he deemed that he should take the city of Priam that very day, fool that he was! seeing he knew not what deeds Zeus was purposing 2.38. /So spoke the Dream, and departed, and left him there, pondering in his heart on things that were not to be brought to pass. For in sooth he deemed that he should take the city of Priam that very day, fool that he was! seeing he knew not what deeds Zeus was purposing 2.39. /So spoke the Dream, and departed, and left him there, pondering in his heart on things that were not to be brought to pass. For in sooth he deemed that he should take the city of Priam that very day, fool that he was! seeing he knew not what deeds Zeus was purposing 2.40. /who was yet to bring woes and groanings on Trojans alike and Danaans throughout the course of stubborn fights. Then he awoke from sleep, and the divine voice was ringing in his ears. He sat upright and did on his soft tunic, fair and glistering, and about him cast his great cloak, and beneath his shining feet he bound his fair sandals
2. Homer, Odyssey, 7.346-7.347, 23.166-23.240, 23.247-23.253, 23.266-23.284, 23.296-23.343, 23.347 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 3.1068-3.1069 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3.1068. δεξιτερῆς· δὴ γάρ οἱ ἀπʼ ὀφθαλμοὺς λίπεν αἰδώς· 3.1069. ‘μνώεο δʼ, ἢν ἄρα δή ποθʼ ὑπότροπος οἴκαδʼ ἵκηαι
4. Ovid, Tristia, 2.375-2.376 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Lucan, Pharsalia, 2.243, 2.263-2.264, 2.266-2.273, 2.286-2.292, 2.297-2.307, 2.312, 2.315, 2.317-2.323, 2.327-2.333, 2.338-2.349 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Quintus Smyrnaeus, Posthomerica, 14.149-14.178



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
action/activity, nocturnal Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 194
agamemnon Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 70
aphrodite, menelaus Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 70
apollonius of rhodes Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 194
aristarchus Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 70
aristophanes Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 70
cato the younger, as anti-odyssean Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 193, 194
danger Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 194
dreams Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 70
endings (literary) Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 70
eroticism, anti-eroticism' Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 70
helen, menelaus and Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 70
homer, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 193, 194
homer, odyssey Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 194
love Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 194
marcia Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 193, 194
medea Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 194
menelaus Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 70
nostos, as master-trope explored by lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 193, 194
odysseus Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 193, 194
ovid Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 193
penelope Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 70; Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 193, 194
simile Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 194
woolwork Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 194
work Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 194