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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 18.349-18.355
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κερτομέων Ὀδυσῆα· γέλω δʼ ἑτάροισιν ἔτευχε.Mocking Odysseus, he made him a source of laughter to his comrades: “Hear me, suitors of a glorious queen, while I say what the heart in my chest commands me. This man came to Odysseus' home, not without god's aid. Nonetheless, it seems to me that there's a blaze of torche
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κὰκ κεφαλῆς, ἐπεὶ οὔ οἱ ἔνι τρίχες οὐδʼ ἠβαιαί.from his head, since no hairs, not even a few, are on it.” He spoke, and said to Odysseus, the sacker of cities, at the same time: “Stranger, would you be willing to work for hire, if I took you into service, and your pay were guaranteed, at the far edge of my farm, growing tall trees and gathering stones for walls?


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.558, 5.418-5.425, 6.217-6.220, 6.224-6.231 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.558. /silver-footed Thetis, daughter of the old man of the sea, have beguiled you; for at early dawn she sat by you and clasped your knees. To her, I think, you bowed your head in sure token that you will honour Achilles, and bring many to death beside the ships of the Achaeans. Then in answer to her spoke Zeus, the cloud-gatherer: 5.418. /the stately wife of horse-taming Diomedes. 5.419. /the stately wife of horse-taming Diomedes. She spake, and with both her hands wiped the ichor from the arm; the arm was restored, and the grievous pains assuaged. But Athene and Hera, as they looked upon her, sought to anger Zeus, son of Cronos, with mocking words. 5.420. /And among them the goddess flashing-eyed Athene was first to speak:Father Zeus, wilt thou anywise be wroth with me for the word that I shall say? of a surety now Cypris has been urging some one of the women of Achaea to follow after the Trojans, whom now she so wondrously loveth; and while stroking such a one of the fair-robed women of Achaea 5.421. /And among them the goddess flashing-eyed Athene was first to speak:Father Zeus, wilt thou anywise be wroth with me for the word that I shall say? of a surety now Cypris has been urging some one of the women of Achaea to follow after the Trojans, whom now she so wondrously loveth; and while stroking such a one of the fair-robed women of Achaea 5.422. /And among them the goddess flashing-eyed Athene was first to speak:Father Zeus, wilt thou anywise be wroth with me for the word that I shall say? of a surety now Cypris has been urging some one of the women of Achaea to follow after the Trojans, whom now she so wondrously loveth; and while stroking such a one of the fair-robed women of Achaea 5.423. /And among them the goddess flashing-eyed Athene was first to speak:Father Zeus, wilt thou anywise be wroth with me for the word that I shall say? of a surety now Cypris has been urging some one of the women of Achaea to follow after the Trojans, whom now she so wondrously loveth; and while stroking such a one of the fair-robed women of Achaea 5.424. /And among them the goddess flashing-eyed Athene was first to speak:Father Zeus, wilt thou anywise be wroth with me for the word that I shall say? of a surety now Cypris has been urging some one of the women of Achaea to follow after the Trojans, whom now she so wondrously loveth; and while stroking such a one of the fair-robed women of Achaea 5.425. /she hath scratched upon her golden brooch her delicate hand. So spake she, but the father of men and gods smiled, and calling to him golden Aphrodite, said:Not unto thee, my child, are given works of war; nay, follow thou after the lovely works of marriage 6.217. / Verily now art thou a friend of my father's house from of old: for goodly Oeneus on a time entertained peerless Bellerophon in his halls, and kept him twenty days; and moreover they gave one to the other fair gifts of friendship. Oeneus gave a belt bright with scarlet 6.218. / Verily now art thou a friend of my father's house from of old: for goodly Oeneus on a time entertained peerless Bellerophon in his halls, and kept him twenty days; and moreover they gave one to the other fair gifts of friendship. Oeneus gave a belt bright with scarlet 6.219. / Verily now art thou a friend of my father's house from of old: for goodly Oeneus on a time entertained peerless Bellerophon in his halls, and kept him twenty days; and moreover they gave one to the other fair gifts of friendship. Oeneus gave a belt bright with scarlet 6.220. /and Bellerophon a double cup of gold which I left in my palace as I came hither. But Tydeus I remember not, seeing I was but a little child when he left, what time the host of the Achaeans perished at Thebes. Therefore now am I a dear guest-friend to thee in the midst of Argos 6.224. /and Bellerophon a double cup of gold which I left in my palace as I came hither. But Tydeus I remember not, seeing I was but a little child when he left, what time the host of the Achaeans perished at Thebes. Therefore now am I a dear guest-friend to thee in the midst of Argos 6.225. /and thou to me in Lycia, whenso I journey to the land of that folk. So let us shun one another's spears even amid the throng; full many there be for me to slay, both Trojans and famed allies, whomsoever a god shall grant me and my feet overtake; 6.226. /and thou to me in Lycia, whenso I journey to the land of that folk. So let us shun one another's spears even amid the throng; full many there be for me to slay, both Trojans and famed allies, whomsoever a god shall grant me and my feet overtake; 6.227. /and thou to me in Lycia, whenso I journey to the land of that folk. So let us shun one another's spears even amid the throng; full many there be for me to slay, both Trojans and famed allies, whomsoever a god shall grant me and my feet overtake; 6.228. /and thou to me in Lycia, whenso I journey to the land of that folk. So let us shun one another's spears even amid the throng; full many there be for me to slay, both Trojans and famed allies, whomsoever a god shall grant me and my feet overtake; 6.229. /and thou to me in Lycia, whenso I journey to the land of that folk. So let us shun one another's spears even amid the throng; full many there be for me to slay, both Trojans and famed allies, whomsoever a god shall grant me and my feet overtake; 6.230. /and many Achaeans again for thee to slay whomsoever thou canst. And let us make exchange of armour, each with the other, that these men too may know that we declare ourselves to be friends from our fathers' days. 6.231. /and many Achaeans again for thee to slay whomsoever thou canst. And let us make exchange of armour, each with the other, that these men too may know that we declare ourselves to be friends from our fathers' days.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 1.169-1.172, 1.179, 1.187, 3.355, 9.1-9.15, 11.188-11.194, 13.326, 15.196-15.197, 18.350-18.355, 24.213-24.348, 24.351, 24.364, 24.412 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aristophanes, Wasps, 1312, 1311 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1311. ὁ δ' ἀνακραγὼν ἀντῄκας' αὐτὸν πάρνοπι


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alcinous Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 98
athena de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 143
clothing de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 143
dialogue de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 143
emotions, grief de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 143
epicureanism Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 98
guest-friendship de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 143
irony, dramatic de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 143
laertes de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 143
narratee de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 143
odysseus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 98; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 143
plato, symposium Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 98
recognition, scenes of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 143
ring-composition de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 143
symposia, in homer Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 98
symposia Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 98
tears de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 143
telemachus' de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 143