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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 17.384-17.386
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ἢ καὶ θέσπιν ἀοιδόν, ὅ κεν τέρπῃσιν ἀείδων;or even an inspired singer, who would delight with his singing? For these are invited by mortals all over the boundless earth, but no one would invite a beggar who'd consume him. But you're always, beyond all the suitors, hard on Odysseus' slaves, especially to me, but as for me
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

26 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.70 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.70. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 1.415-1.416, 15.160-15.178, 17.382-17.383, 17.385-17.386, 19.135 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 32 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

32. τορὸς δὲ Φοῖβος ὀρθόθριξ 32. For with a hair-raising shriek, Terror, the diviner of dreams for our house, breathing wrath out of sleep, uttered a cry of terror in the dead of night from the heart of the palace
4. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 6.17 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Herodotus, Histories, 1.53, 9.33-9.36, 9.92-9.94 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.53. The Lydians who were to bring these gifts to the temples were instructed by Croesus to inquire of the oracles whether he was to send an army against the Persians and whether he was to add an army of allies. ,When the Lydians came to the places where they were sent, they presented the offerings, and inquired of the oracles, in these words: “Croesus, king of Lydia and other nations, believing that here are the only true places of divination among men, endows you with such gifts as your wisdom deserves. And now he asks you whether he is to send an army against the Persians, and whether he is to add an army of allies.” ,Such was their inquiry; and the judgment given to Croesus by each of the two oracles was the same: namely, that if he should send an army against the Persians he would destroy a great empire. And they advised him to discover the mightiest of the Greeks and make them his friends. 9.33. On the second day after they had all been arrayed according to their nations and their battalions, both armies offered sacrifice. It was Tisamenus who sacrificed for the Greeks, for he was with their army as a diviner; he was an Elean by birth, a Clytiad of the Iamid clan, and the Lacedaemonians gave him the freedom of their city. ,This they did, for when Tisamenus was inquiring of the oracle at Delphi concerning offspring, the priestess prophesied to him that he should win five great victories. Not understanding that oracle, he engaged in bodily exercise, thinking that he would then be able to win in similar sports. When he had trained himself for the Five Contests, he came within one wrestling bout of winning the Olympic prize, in a match with Hieronymus of Andros. ,The Lacedaemonians, however, perceived that the oracle given to Tisamenus spoke of the lists not of sport but of war, and they attempted to bribe Tisamenus to be a leader in their wars jointly with their kings of Heracles' line. ,When he saw that the Spartans set great store by his friendship, he set his price higher, and made it known to them that he would do what they wanted only in exchange for the gift of full citizenship and all of the citizen's rights. ,Hearing that, the Spartans at first were angry and completely abandoned their request; but when the dreadful menace of this Persian host hung over them, they consented and granted his demand. When he saw their purpose changed, he said that he would not be content with that alone; his brother Hegias too must be made a Spartan on the same terms as himself. 9.34. By so saying he imitated Melampus, in so far as one may compare demands for kingship with those for citizenship. For when the women of Argos had gone mad, and the Argives wanted him to come from Pylos and heal them of that madness, Melampus demanded half of their kingship for his wages. ,This the Argives would not put up with and departed. When, however, the madness spread among their women, they promised what Melampus demanded and were ready to give it to him. Thereupon, seeing their purpose changed, he demanded yet more and said that he would not do their will except if they gave a third of their kingship to his brother Bias; now driven into dire straits, the Argives consented to that also. 9.35. The Spartans too were so eagerly desirous of winning Tisamenus that they granted everything that he demanded. When they had granted him this also, Tisamenus of Elis, now a Spartan, engaged in divination for them and aided them to win five very great victories. No one on earth save Tisamenus and his brother ever became citizens of Sparta. ,Now the five victories were these: one, the first, this victory at Plataea; next, that which was won at Tegea over the Tegeans and Argives; after that, over all the Arcadians save the Mantineans at Dipaea; next, over the Messenians at Ithome; lastly, the victory at Tanagra over the Athenians and Argives, which was the last won of the five victories. 9.36. This Tisamenus had now been brought by the Spartans and was the diviner of the Greeks at Plataea. The sacrifices boded good to the Greeks if they would just defend themselves, but evil if they should cross the Asopus and be the first to attack. 9.92. He said this and added deed to word. For straightway the Samians bound themselves by pledge and oath to alliance with the Greeks. ,This done, the rest sailed away, but Leutychides bade Hegesistratus to sail with the Greeks because of the good omen of his name. The Greeks waited through that day, and on the next they sought and received favorable augury; their diviner was Deiphonus son of Evenius, a man of that Apollonia which is in the Ionian gulf. This man's father Evenius had once fared as I will now relate. 9.93. There is at Apollonia a certain flock sacred to the Sun, which in the daytime is pastured beside the river Chon, which flows from the mountain called Lacmon through the lands of Apollonia and empties into the sea by the harbor of Oricum. By night, those townsmen who are most notable for wealth or lineage are chosen to watch it, each man serving for a year, for the people of Apollonia set great store by this flock, being so taught by a certain oracle. It is kept in a cave far distant from the town. ,Now at the time of which I speak, Evenius was the chosen watchman. But one night he fell asleep, and wolves, coming past his guard into the cave, killed about sixty of the flock. When Evenius was aware of it, he held his peace and told no man, intending to restore what was lost by buying others. ,This matter was not, however, hidden from the people of Apollonia, and when it came to their knowledge they brought him to judgment and condemned him to lose his eyesight for sleeping at his watch. So they blinded Evenius, but from the day of their so doing their flocks bore no offspring, nor did their land yield fruit as before. ,Furthermore, a declaration was given to them at Dodona and Delphi, when they inquired of the prophets what might be the cause of their present ill: the gods told them by their prophets that they had done unjustly in blinding Evenius, the guardian of the sacred flock, “for we ourselves” (they said) “sent those wolves, and we will not cease from avenging him until you make him such restitution for what you did as he himself chooses and approves; when that is fully done, we ourselves will give Evenius such a gift as will make many men consider him happy.” 9.94. This was the oracle given to the people of Apollonia. They kept it secret and charged certain of their townsmen to carry the business through; they acted as I will now show. Coming and sitting down by Evenius at the place where he sat, they spoke of other matters, till at last they fell to commiserating his misfortune. Guiding the conversation in this way, they asked him what compensation he would choose, if the people of Apollonia should promise to requite him for what they had done. ,He, knowing nothing of the oracle, said he would choose for a gift the lands of certain named townsmen whom he thought to have the two fairest estates in Apollonia, and a house besides which he knew to be the fairest in the town; let him (he said) have possession of these, and he would lay aside his anger, and be satisfied with that by way of restitution. ,So he said this, and those who were sitting beside him said in reply: “Evenius, the people of Apollonia hereby make you that restitution for the loss of your sight, obeying the oracle given to them.” At that he was very angry, for he learned through this the whole story and saw that they had cheated him. They did, however, buy from the possessors and give him what he had chosen, and from that day he had a natural gift of divination, through which he won fame.
9. Plato, Charmides, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

173c. our shoes, nay, everything about us, and various things besides, because we should be employing genuine craftsmen? And if you liked, we might concede that prophecy, as the knowledge of what is to be, and temperance directing her, will deter the charlatans, and establish the true prophets as our prognosticators. Thus equipped, the human race would indeed act and live
10. Plato, Cratylus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

405a. Hermogenes. Go on; you seem to imply that it is a remarkable name. Socrates. His name and nature are in harmony; you see he is a musical god. For in the first place, purification and purgations used in medicine and in soothsaying, and fumigations with medicinal and magic drugs
11. Plato, Euthyphro, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3c. Socrates. My dear Euthyphro, their ridicule is perhaps of no consequence. For the Athenians, I fancy, are not much concerned, if they think a man is clever, provided he does not impart his clever notions to others; but when they think he makes others to be like himself
12. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

13. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

248c. on which the soul is raised up is nourished by this. And this is a law of Destiny, that the soul which follows after God and obtains a view of any of the truths is free from harm until the next period, and if it can always attain this, is always unharmed; but when, through inability to follow, it fails to see, and through some mischance is filled with forgetfulness and evil and grows heavy, and when it has grown heavy, loses its wings and falls to the earth, then it is the law that this soul
14. Plato, Statesman, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

290c. to look for them in any servile position. Y. Soc. Certainly. Str. But let us draw a little closer still to those whom we have not yet examined. There are men who have to do with divination and possess a portion of a certain menial science; for they are supposed to be interpreters of the gods to men. Y. Soc. Yes. Str. And then, too, the priests, according to law and custom, know how to give the gods, by means of sacrifices, the gifts that please them from u
15. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

364b. and disregard those who are in any way weak or poor, even while admitting that they are better men than the others. But the strangest of all these speeches are the things they say about the gods and virtue, how so it is that the gods themselves assign to many good men misfortunes and an evil life but to their opposites a contrary lot; and begging priests and soothsayers go to rich men’s doors and make them believe that they by means of sacrifices and incantations have accumulated a treasure of power from the gods that can expiate and cure with pleasurable festival
16. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

188c. namely, all means of communion between gods and men, are only concerned with either the preservation or the cure of Love. For impiety is usually in each case the result of refusing to gratify the orderly Love or to honor and prefer him in all our affairs, and of yielding to the other in questions of duty towards one’s parents whether alive or dead, and also towards the gods. To divination is appointed the task of supervising and treating the health of these Loves; wherefore that art
17. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

89a. Tim.
18. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 388-389, 387 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

19. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 7.50.4, 8.1.1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7.50.4. All was at last ready, and they were on the point of sailing away, when an eclipse of the moon, which was then at the full, took place. Most of the Athenians, deeply impressed by this occurrence, now urged the generals to wait; and Nicias, who was somewhat over-addicted to divination and practices of that kind, refused from that moment even to take the question of departure into consideration, until they had waited the thrice nine days prescribed by the soothsayers. The besiegers were thus condemned to stay in the country; 8.1.1. Such were the events in Sicily . When the news was brought to Athens, for a long while they disbelieved even the most respectable of the soldiers who had themselves escaped from the scene of action and clearly reported the matter, a destruction so complete not being thought credible. When the conviction was forced upon them, they were angry with the orators who had joined in promoting the expedition, just as if they had not themselves voted it, and were enraged also with the reciters of oracles and soothsayers, and all other omenmongers of the time who had encouraged them to hope that they should conquer Sicily .
20. Xenophon, Hellenica, 2.4.18-2.4.19 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.4.18. After saying these words and turning about to face the enemy, he kept quiet; for the seer bade them not to attack until one of their own number was either killed or wounded. But as soon as that happens, he said, we shall lead on, and to you who follow will come victory, but death, methinks, to me. 2.4.19. And his saying did not prove false, for when they had taken up their shields, he, as though led on by a kind of fate, leaped forth first of all, fell upon the enemy, and was slain, and he lies buried at the ford of the Cephisus; but the others were victorious, and pursued the enemy as far as the level ground. In this battle fell two of the Thirty, Critias and Hippomachus, one of the Ten who ruled in Piraeus, Charmides, the son of Glaucon, and about seventy of the others. And the victors took possession of their arms, but they did not strip off the tunic Worn underneath the breastplate. The victors, then, appropriated the arms and armour of the dead, but not their clothing. of any citizen. When this had been done and while they were giving back the bodies of the dead, many on either side mingled and talked with one another.
21. Plutarch, Nicias, 23.1-23.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 3.11.5-3.11.10, 10.9.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.11.5. At the altar of Augustus they show a bronze statue of Agias. This Agias, they say, by divining for Lysander captured the Athenian fleet at Aegospotami with the exception of ten ships of war. 405 B.C. These made their escape to Cyprus ; all the rest the Lacedaemonians captured along with their crews. Agias was a son of Agelochus, a son of Tisamenus. 3.11.6. Tisamenus belonged to the family of the Iamidae at Elis, and an oracle was given to him that he should win five most famous contests. So he trained for the pentathlon at Olympia, but came away defeated. And yet he was first in two events, beating Hieronymus of Andros in running and in jumping. But when he lost the wrestling bout to this competitor, and so missed the prize, he understood what the oracle meant, that the god granted him to win five contests in war by his divinations. 3.11.7. The Lacedaemonians, hearing of the oracle the Pythian priestess had given to Tisamenus, persuaded him to migrate from Elis and to be state-diviner at Sparta . And Tisamenus won them five contests in war. 479 B.C. The first was at Plataea against the Persians; the second was at Tegea, when the Lacedaemonians had engaged the Tegeans and Argives; the third was at Dipaea, an Arcadian town in Maenalia, when all the Arcadians except the Mantineans were arrayed against them. 3.11.8. His fourth contest was against the Helots who had rebelled and left the Isthmus for Ithome . 464 B.C. Not all the Helots revolted, only the Messenian element, which separated itself off from the old Helots. These events I shall relate presently. On the occasion I mention the Lacedaemonians allowed the rebels to depart under a truce, in accordance with the advice of Tisamenus and of the oracle at Delphi . The last time Tisamenus divined for them was at Tanagra, an engagement taking place with the Argives and Athenians. 457 B.C. 3.11.9. Such I learned was the history of Tisamenus. On their market-place the Spartans have images of Apollo Pythaeus, of Artemis and of Leto. The whole of this region is called Choros (Dancing), because at the Gymnopaediae, a festival which the Lacedaemonians take more seriously than any other, the lads perform dances in honor of Apollo. Not far from them is a sanctuary of Earth and of Zeus of the Market-place, another of Athena of the Market-place and of Poseidon surnamed Securer, and likewise one of Apollo and of Hera. 3.11.10. There is also dedicated a colossal statue of the Spartan People. The Lacedaemonians have also a sanctuary of the Fates, by which is the grave of Orestes, son of Agamemnon. For when the bones of Orestes were brought from Tegea in accordance with an oracle they were buried here. Beside the grave of Orestes is a statue of Polydorus, son of Alcamenes, a king who rose to such honor that the magistrates seal with his likeness everything that requires sealing. 10.9.7. Opposite these are offerings of the Lacedaemonians from spoils of the Athenians: the Dioscuri, Zeus, Apollo, Artemis, and beside these Poseidon, Lysander, son of Aristocritus, represented as being crowned by Poseidon, Agias, soothsayer to Lysander on the occasion of his victory, and Hermon, who steered his flag-ship.
23. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 8.36 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8.36. This is what Alexander says that he found in the Pythagorean memoirs. What follows is Aristotle's.But Pythagoras's great dignity not even Timon overlooked, who, although he digs at him in his Silli, speaks ofPythagoras, inclined to witching works and ways,Man-snarer, fond of noble periphrase.Xenophanes confirms the statement about his having been different people at different times in the elegiacs beginning:Now other thoughts, another path, I show.What he says of him is as follows:They say that, passing a belaboured whelp,He, full of pity, spake these words of dole:Stay, smite not ! 'Tis a friend, a human soul;I knew him straight whenas I heard him yelp !
24. Epigraphy, Ig I , 104

25. Epigraphy, Ig I , 104

26. Epigraphy, Seg, 16.193



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abroad Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 92
agroikos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 31
amphiaraus Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117, 118
analogy, with τέχνη Bartels, Plato's Pragmatic Project: A Reading of Plato's Laws (2017) 46
animals Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 92
apollo Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
archon-list Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 31
aristotle, on divination Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
aristotle, on manteis Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
asclepius Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
authority Bartels, Plato's Pragmatic Project: A Reading of Plato's Laws (2017) 46
bouché-leclercq, auguste Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 177
burkert, w. Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 153
calchas Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 113
chrêsmologos Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 177
cicero, on divination Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 113
correctness, emotional Bartels, Plato's Pragmatic Project: A Reading of Plato's Laws (2017) 46
croesus Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 113
delphi Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
deontology/conduct Petridou, Homo Patiens: Approaches to the Patient in the Ancient World (2016) 258
dillery, j. Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 153
dillery, john Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 177
divination, and authority Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 177
divination, and patronage Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 177
divination, and sound thinking Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
divination, itinerant diviners Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 153
divination, practised by amateurs Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 113
divination, the delphic oracle Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 113
divination Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227; Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129; Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 113
dêmiourgos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 31
dēmioergoi and seers Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 14
eumaeus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 177
eupatridai Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 31
euripides Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 113
forest Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 92
garden Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 92
harmony, musical Bartels, Plato's Pragmatic Project: A Reading of Plato's Laws (2017) 46
healing magic Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
helen Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 92
hellenistic period Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 14
heracles Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 168
herodotus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
hippocratic medicine Petridou, Homo Patiens: Approaches to the Patient in the Ancient World (2016) 258
homer, on divination Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 113
homer Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
iamus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
invitations/summons Petridou, Homo Patiens: Approaches to the Patient in the Ancient World (2016) 258
ithaca/ithaka Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 92
kleisthenes Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 31
laws Bartels, Plato's Pragmatic Project: A Reading of Plato's Laws (2017) 46
lot Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 31
magic, criticisms and punishments of Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
mania, and social class/status Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 177
mania, family genealogies of Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 177
mania, poet as Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 177
mania Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 177
manteis, aristotle on Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
manteis, criticisms of Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
manteis, euthyphro as Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
manteis, inspired Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
manteis, status of Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
manteis Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
mantis, battle participation of manteis Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117, 118
mantis, elucidation of past Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 118
mantis Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117, 118
medicine Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
melampus, melampids Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117, 118
menelaus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
musaeus Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 168
music Bartels, Plato's Pragmatic Project: A Reading of Plato's Laws (2017) 46
mysteries Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
nestor Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 92
odysseus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 92
oedipus Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 118
olympia, oracle and sanctuary of zeus at Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117
olympics Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
orpheus, and homosexuality Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 168
orpheus, as thracian Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 168
orpheus, death of Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 168
paideia Bartels, Plato's Pragmatic Project: A Reading of Plato's Laws (2017) 46
peisistratos, and archonship Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 31
penelope Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 92
pindar Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
plato, on divination Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 113
pleasure Bartels, Plato's Pragmatic Project: A Reading of Plato's Laws (2017) 46
poets and poetry Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
preamble Bartels, Plato's Pragmatic Project: A Reading of Plato's Laws (2017) 46
priests and priestesses, begging Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
priests and priestesses, criticisms of Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
punishment Bartels, Plato's Pragmatic Project: A Reading of Plato's Laws (2017) 46
rome Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 31
sacrifices, and justice Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
sacrifices, persuading the gods Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
seers, itinerancy of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 14
seers, outsider status of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 14
seers, overview of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 14
sicilian expedition Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117
simile Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 92
sophocles Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 113
sound thinking, and divination Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
sparta Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
teiresias Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
tellias, telliadae Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117
tiresias Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 118
tisamenos Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
tisamenus Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117
town Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 92
troy Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 92
wandering, and divination' Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 153
war, success in, and manteis Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 129
wealth Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 92
weather signs (see divination, and weather signs) Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 177
wine Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 92
women patients Petridou, Homo Patiens: Approaches to the Patient in the Ancient World (2016) 258
wooden walls, oracle concerning Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 117
workers Petridou, Homo Patiens: Approaches to the Patient in the Ancient World (2016) 258
writing, law Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 31
xenophanes, divinatory language in Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 153
xenophanes, his attitude to divine disclosure, his attitude to divine disclosure Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 113, 153
xenophanes, on divination Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 153
xenophanes, on his own wisdom Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 153
zeus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227