Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 15.225


μάντις· ἀτὰρ γενεήν γε Μελάμποδος ἔκγονος ἦενHe was a seer, but sprung from the line of Melampus, who once upon a time had lived in Pylos, mother of sheep, a wealthy one who lived in a great preeminent house in Pylos. Eventually he went to a kingdom of other men, fleeing his fatherland and great-hearted Neleus, most illustrious of living men


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

38 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Nahum, 1.1 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.1. כִּי עַד־סִירִים סְבֻכִים וּכְסָבְאָם סְבוּאִים אֻכְּלוּ כְּקַשׁ יָבֵשׁ מָלֵא׃ 1.1. מַשָּׂא נִינְוֵה סֵפֶר חֲזוֹן נַחוּם הָאֶלְקֹשִׁי׃ 1.1. The burden of Nineveh. The book of the vision of Nahum the Elkoshite."
2. Hebrew Bible, Obadiah, 1 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3. Hebrew Bible, 2 Kings, 17.13 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17.13. וַיָּעַד יְהוָה בְּיִשְׂרָאֵל וּבִיהוּדָה בְּיַד כָּל־נביאו [נְבִיאֵי] כָל־חֹזֶה לֵאמֹר שֻׁבוּ מִדַּרְכֵיכֶם הָרָעִים וְשִׁמְרוּ מִצְוֺתַי חֻקּוֹתַי כְּכָל־הַתּוֹרָה אֲשֶׁר צִוִּיתִי אֶת־אֲבֹתֵיכֶם וַאֲשֶׁר שָׁלַחְתִּי אֲלֵיכֶם בְּיַד עֲבָדַי הַנְּבִיאִים׃ 17.13. yet the LORD forewarned Israel, and Judah, by the hand of every prophet, and of every seer, saying: ‘Turn ye from your evil ways, and keep My commandments and My statutes, according to all the law which I commanded your fathers, and which I sent to you by the hand of My servants the prophets’;"
4. Hebrew Bible, Habakkuk, 2.2-2.3 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

2.2. וַיַּעֲנֵנִי יְהוָה וַיֹּאמֶר כְּתוֹב חָזוֹן וּבָאֵר עַל־הַלֻּחוֹת לְמַעַן יָרוּץ קוֹרֵא בוֹ׃ 2.2. וַיהוָה בְּהֵיכַל קָדְשׁוֹ הַס מִפָּנָיו כָּל־הָאָרֶץ׃ 2.3. כִּי עוֹד חָזוֹן לַמּוֹעֵד וְיָפֵחַ לַקֵּץ וְלֹא יְכַזֵּב אִם־יִתְמַהְמָהּ חַכֵּה־לוֹ כִּי־בֹא יָבֹא לֹא יְאַחֵר׃ 2.2. And the LORD answered me, and said: ‘Write the vision, and make it plain upon tables, That a man may read it swiftly." 2.3. For the vision is yet for the appointed time, And it declareth of the end, and doth not lie; Though it tarry, wait for it; Because it will surely come, it will not delay.’"
5. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 1.1 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.1. שִׁמְעוּ דְבַר־יְהוָה קְצִינֵי סְדֹם הַאֲזִינוּ תּוֹרַת אֱלֹהֵינוּ עַם עֲמֹרָה׃ 1.1. חֲזוֹן יְשַׁעְיָהוּ בֶן־אָמוֹץ אֲשֶׁר חָזָה עַל־יְהוּדָה וִירוּשָׁלִָם בִּימֵי עֻזִּיָּהוּ יוֹתָם אָחָז יְחִזְקִיָּהוּ מַלְכֵי יְהוּדָה׃ 1.1. The Vision of Isaiah the son of Amoz, which he saw concerning Judah and Jerusalem, in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah."
6. Hebrew Bible, Jeremiah, 14.14, 23.16 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14.14. וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֵלַי שֶׁקֶר הַנְּבִאִים נִבְּאִים בִּשְׁמִי לֹא שְׁלַחְתִּים וְלֹא צִוִּיתִים וְלֹא דִבַּרְתִּי אֲלֵיהֶם חֲזוֹן שֶׁקֶר וְקֶסֶם ואלול [וֶאֱלִיל] ותרמות [וְתַרְמִית] לִבָּם הֵמָּה מִתְנַבְּאִים לָכֶם׃ 23.16. כֹּה־אָמַר יְהוָה צְבָאוֹת אַל־תִּשְׁמְעוּ עַל־דִּבְרֵי הַנְּבִאִים הַנִּבְּאִים לָכֶם מַהְבִּלִים הֵמָּה אֶתְכֶם חֲזוֹן לִבָּם יְדַבֵּרוּ לֹא מִפִּי יְהוָה׃ 14.14. Then the LORD said unto me: ‘The prophets prophesy lies in My name; I sent them not, neither have I commanded them, neither spoke I unto them; they prophesy unto you a lying vision, and divination, and a thing of nought, and the deceit of their own heart." 23.16. Thus saith the LORD of hosts: Hearken not unto the words of the prophets that prophesy unto you, They lead you unto vanity; They speak a vision of their own heart, And not out of the mouth of the LORD."
7. Hesiod, Fragments, None (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

8. Homer, Odyssey, 1.68-1.73, 7.53-7.59, 9.19-9.20, 11.281-11.298, 15.223-15.224, 15.226-15.258, 15.260, 15.271-15.278, 20.351-20.370 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

9. Acusilaus, Fragments, 28 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

10. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1199-1212, 1269-1274, 1198 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1198. καὶ πῶς ἂν ὅρκος, πῆγμα γενναίως παγέν 1198. And how should oath, bond honourably binding
11. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 18 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. ἵζει τέταρτον τοῖσδε μάντιν ἐν θρόνοις·
12. Hebrew Bible, Ezekiel, 12.24 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12.24. כִּי לֹא יִהְיֶה עוֹד כָּל־חֲזוֹן שָׁוְא וּמִקְסַם חָלָק בְּתוֹךְ בֵּית יִשְׂרָאֵל׃ 12.24. For there shall be no more any vain vision nor smooth divination within the house of Israel."
13. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 1.38-1.42, 10.16-10.17, 10.39-10.42, 10.49-10.50 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 6 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Pindar, Paeanes, 20 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Aristophanes, Birds, 988 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

988. μήτ' ἢν Λάμπων ᾖ μήτ' ἢν ὁ μέγας Διοπείθης.
17. Aristophanes, Knights, 1085, 1084 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1084. οὐκ ὀρθῶς φράζει: τὴν Κυλλήνην γὰρ ὁ Φοῖβος
18. Aristophanes, Peace, 1125, 1047 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1047. οὗτός γέ πού 'σθ' ὁ χρησμολόγος οὑξ ̓Ωρεοῦ.
19. Aristophanes, Wasps, 380 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

380. δήσας σαυτὸν καὶ τὴν ψυχὴν ἐμπλησάμενος Διοπείθους.
20. Herodotus, Histories, 2.49, 3.132.2, 5.44.2, 7.228, 8.27.3, 9.33.1, 9.34, 9.37.1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.49. Now then, it seems to me that Melampus son of Amytheon was not ignorant of but was familiar with this sacrifice. For Melampus was the one who taught the Greeks the name of Dionysus and the way of sacrificing to him and the phallic procession; he did not exactly unveil the subject taking all its details into consideration, for the teachers who came after him made a fuller revelation; but it was from him that the Greeks learned to bear the phallus along in honor of Dionysus, and they got their present practice from his teaching. ,I say, then, that Melampus acquired the prophetic art, being a discerning man, and that, besides many other things which he learned from Egypt, he also taught the Greeks things concerning Dionysus, altering few of them; for I will not say that what is done in Egypt in connection with the god and what is done among the Greeks originated independently: for they would then be of an Hellenic character and not recently introduced. ,Nor again will I say that the Egyptians took either this or any other custom from the Greeks. But I believe that Melampus learned the worship of Dionysus chiefly from Cadmus of Tyre and those who came with Cadmus from Phoenicia to the land now called Boeotia . 3.132.2. When the Egyptian physicians who until now had attended the king were about to be impaled for being less skilful than a Greek, Democedes interceded with the king for them and saved them; and he saved an Elean seer, too, who had been a retainer of Polycrates' and was forgotten among the slaves. Democedes was a man of considerable influence with the King. 5.44.2. This is the story which the Sybarites tell of Dorieus and his companions, but the Crotoniats say that they were aided by no stranger in their war with Sybaris with the exception of Callias, an Elean diviner of the Iamid clan. About him there was a story that he had fled to Croton from Telys, the tyrant of Sybaris, because as he was sacrificing for victory over Croton, he could obtain no favorable omens. 7.228. There is an inscription written over these men, who were buried where they fell, and over those who died before the others went away, dismissed by Leonidas. It reads as follows: quote type="inscription" l met="dact"Here four thousand from the Peloponnese once fought three million. /l /quote ,That inscription is for them all, but the Spartans have their own: quote type="inscription" l met="dact"Foreigner, go tell the Spartans that we lie here obedient to their commands. /l /quote ,That one is to the Lacedaemonians, this one to the seer: quote type="inscription" l met="dact"This is a monument to the renowned Megistias, /l lSlain by the Medes who crossed the Spercheius river. /l lThe seer knew well his coming doom, /l lBut endured not to abandon the leaders of Sparta. /l /quote ,Except for the seer's inscription, the Amphictyons are the ones who honored them by erecting inscriptions and pillars. That of the seer Megistias was inscribed by Simonides son of Leoprepes because of his tie of guest-friendship with the man. 8.27.3. When the Phocians were besieged on Parnassus, they had with them the diviner Tellias of Elis; Tellias devised a stratagem for them: he covered six hundred of the bravest Phocians with gypsum, themselves and their armor, and led them to attack the Thessalians by night, bidding them slay whomever they should see not whitened. 9.33.1. On the second day after they had all been arrayed according to their nations and their battalions, both armies offered sacrifice. It was Tisamenus who sacrificed for the Greeks, for he was with their army as a diviner; he was an Elean by birth, a Clytiad of the Iamid clan, and the Lacedaemonians gave him the freedom of their city. 9.34. By so saying he imitated Melampus, in so far as one may compare demands for kingship with those for citizenship. For when the women of Argos had gone mad, and the Argives wanted him to come from Pylos and heal them of that madness, Melampus demanded half of their kingship for his wages. ,This the Argives would not put up with and departed. When, however, the madness spread among their women, they promised what Melampus demanded and were ready to give it to him. Thereupon, seeing their purpose changed, he demanded yet more and said that he would not do their will except if they gave a third of their kingship to his brother Bias; now driven into dire straits, the Argives consented to that also. 9.37.1. Mardonius' sacrifices also foretold an unfavorable outcome if he should be zealous to attack first, and good if he should but defend himself. He too used the Greek manner of sacrifice, and Hegesistratus of Elis was his diviner, the most notable of the sons of Tellias. This man had been put in prison and condemned to die by the Spartans for the great harm which he had done them.
21. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 5.6.29 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

22. Xenophon, Hellenica, 3.3.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3.3.3. But Diopeithes, a man very well versed in oracles, said in support of Leotychides that there was also an oracle of Apollo which bade the Lacedaemonians beware of the lame kingship. Agesilaus was lame. Lysander, however, made reply to him, on behalf of Agesilaus, that he did not suppose the god was bidding them beware lest a king of theirs should get a sprain and become lame, but rather lest one who was not of the royal stock should become king. For the kingship would be lame in very truth when it was not the descendants of Heracles who were at the head of the state.
23. Demosthenes, Orations, 25.79 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

24. Theocritus, Idylls, 24.1-24.2 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

25. Theophrastus, Characters, 16.3 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

26. Cicero, On Divination, 1.91 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.91. nec quisquam rex Persarum potest esse, qui non ante magorum disciplinam scientiamque perceperit. Licet autem videre et genera quaedam et nationes huic scientiae deditas. Telmessus in Caria est, qua in urbe excellit haruspicum disciplina; itemque Elis in Peloponneso familias duas certas habet, Iamidarum unam, alteram Clutidarum, haruspicinae nobilitate praestantes. In Syria Chaldaei cognitione astrorum sollertiaque ingeniorum antecellunt. 1.91. Indeed, no one can become king of the Persians until he has learned the theory and the practice of the magi. Moreover, you may see whole families and tribes devoted to this art. For example, Telmessus in Caria is a city noted for its cultivation of the soothsayers art, and there is also Elis in Peloponnesus, which has permanently set aside two families as soothsayers, the Iamidae and the Clutidae, who are distinguished for superior skill in their art. In Syria the Chaldeans are pre-eminent for their knowledge of astronomy and for their quickness of mind.
27. Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 70, 128 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

28. Ovid, Amores, 1.1, 1.1.1, 1.1.4-1.1.5, 1.1.7-1.1.8, 1.1.16, 1.1.21-1.1.26 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

29. Ovid, Fasti, 5.663-5.678, 5.681-5.692 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5.663. Tiber spoke, entering a moist cave of natural stone 5.664. While you, gentle waters, checked your flow. 5.665. Come, Mercury, Atlas’ famous grandson, you whom 5.666. A Pleiad once bore to Jove, among the Arcadian hills 5.667. Arbiter of war and peace to gods on high, and those below: 5.668. You who make your way with winged feet: who delight 5.669. In the sounding lyre, and the gleaming wrestling: 5.670. You through whose teaching the tongue learnt eloquence: 5.671. On the Ides, the Senate founded for you, a temple facing 5.672. The Circus: since then today has been your festival. 5.673. All those who make a living trading their wares 5.674. offer you incense, and beg you to swell their profits. 5.675. There’s Mercury’s fountain close to the Capene Gate: 5.676. It’s potent, if you believe those who’ve tried it. 5.677. Here the merchant, cleansed, with his tunic girt 5.678. Draws water and carries it off, in a purified jar. 5.681. And he sprinkles his hair with dripping laurel too 5.682. And with that voice, that often deceives, utters prayers: 5.683. ‘Wash away all the lies of the past,’ he says 5.684. ‘Wash away all the perjured words of a day that’s gone. 5.685. If I’ve called on you as witness, and falsely invoked 5.686. Jove’s great power, hoping he wouldn’t hear: 5.687. If I’ve knowingly taken the names of gods and goddesses 5.688. In vain: let the swift southerlies steal my sinful words 5.689. And leave the day clear for me, for further perjuries 5.690. And let the gods above fail to notice I’ve uttered any. 5.691. Just grant me my profit, give me joy of the profit I’ve made: 5.692. And make sure I’ll have the pleasure of cheating a buyer.’
30. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.453, 1.456, 1.458, 1.461, 1.466-1.474, 1.515-1.522 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

31. Strabo, Geography, 8.3.19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.3.19. At the base of these mountains, on the seaboard, are two caves. One is the cave of the nymphs called Anigriades; the other is the scene of the stories of the daughters of Atlas and of the birth of Dardanus. And here, too, are the sacred precincts called the Ionaion and the Eurycydeium. Samicum is now only a fortress, though formerly there was also a city which was called Samos, perhaps because of its lofty situation; for they used to call lofty places Samoi. And perhaps Samicum was the acropolis of Arene, which the poet mentions in the Catalogue: And those who dwelt in Pylus and lovely Arene. For while they cannot with certainty discover Arene anywhere, they prefer to conjecture that this is its site; and the neighboring River Anigrus, formerly called Minyeius, gives no slight indication of the truth of the conjecture, for the poet says: And there is a River Minyeius which falls into the sea near Arene. For near the cave of the nymphs called Anigriades is a spring which makes the region that lies below it swampy and marshy. The greater part of the water is received by the Anigrus, a river so deep and so sluggish that it forms a marsh; and since the region is muddy, it emits an offensive odor for a distance of twenty stadia, and makes the fish unfit to eat. In the mythical accounts, however, this is attributed by some writers to the fact that certain of the Centaurs here washed off the poison they got from the Hydra, and by others to the fact that Melampus used these cleansing waters for the purification of the Proetides. The bathing-water from here cures leprosy, elephantiasis, and scabies. It is said, also, that the Alpheius was so named from its being a cure for leprosy. At any rate, since both the sluggishness of the Anigrus and the backwash from the sea give fixity rather than current to its waters, it was called the Minyeius in earlier times, so it is said, though some have perverted the name and made it Minteius instead. But the word has other sources of derivation, either from the people who went forth with Chloris, the mother of Nestor, from the Minyeian Orchomenus, or from the Minyans, who, being descendants of the Argonauts, were first driven out of Lemnos into Lacedemon, and thence into Triphylia, and took up their abode about Arene in the country which is now called Hypaesia, though it no longer has the settlements of the Minyans. Some of these Minyans sailed with Theras, the son of Autesion, who was a descendant of Polyneices, to the island which is situated between Cyrenaea and Crete (Calliste its earlier name, but Thera its later, as Callimachus says), and founded Thera, the mother-city of Cyrene, and designated the island by the same name as the city.
32. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 1.9.11-1.9.12, 2.2.2, 3.6.2, 3.7.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.9.11. Κρηθεὺς δὲ κτίσας Ἰωλκὸν γαμεῖ Τυρὼ τὴν Σαλμωνέως, ἐξ ἧς αὐτῷ γίνονται παῖδες Αἴσων Ἀμυθάων Φέρης. Ἀμυθάων μὲν οὖν οἰκῶν Πύλον 1 -- Εἰδομένην γαμεῖ τὴν Φέρητος, καὶ γίνονται παῖδες αὐτῷ Βίας καὶ Μελάμπους, ὃς ἐπὶ τῶν χωρίων διατελῶν, οὔσης πρὸ τῆς οἰκήσεως αὐτοῦ δρυὸς ἐν ᾗ φωλεὸς ὄφεων ὑπῆρχεν, ἀποκτεινάντων τῶν θεραπόντων τοὺς ὄφεις τὰ μὲν ἑρπετὰ ξύλα συμφορήσας ἔκαυσε, τοὺς δὲ τῶν ὄφεων νεοσσοὺς ἔθρεψεν. οἱ δὲ γενόμενοι τέλειοι παραστάντες 2 -- αὐτῷ κοιμωμένῳ τῶν ὤμων ἐξ ἑκατέρου τὰς ἀκοὰς ταῖς γλώσσαις ἐξεκάθαιρον. ὁ δὲ ἀναστὰς καὶ γενόμενος περιδεὴς τῶν ὑπερπετομένων ὀρνέων τὰς φωνὰς συνίει, καὶ παρʼ ἐκείνων μανθάνων προύλεγε τοῖς ἀνθρώποις τὰ μέλλοντα. προσέλαβε δὲ καὶ τὴν διὰ τῶν ἱερῶν μαντικήν, περὶ δὲ τὸν Ἀλφειὸν συντυχὼν Ἀπόλλωνι τὸ λοιπὸν ἄριστος ἦν μάντις. 1.9.12. Βίας δὲ 3 -- ἐμνηστεύετο Πηρὼ τὴν Νηλέως· ὁ δὲ πολλῶν αὐτῷ μνηστευομένων τὴν θυγατέρα δώσειν ἔφη τῷ τὰς Φυλάκου 1 -- βόας κομίσαντι αὐτῷ. αὗται δὲ ἦσαν ἐν Φυλάκῃ, καὶ κύων ἐφύλασσεν αὐτὰς οὗ οὔτε ἄνθρωπος οὔτε θηρίον πέλας ἐλθεῖν ἠδύνατο. ταύτας ἀδυνατῶν Βίας τὰς βόας κλέψαι παρεκάλει τὸν ἀδελφὸν συλλαβέσθαι. Μελάμπους δὲ ὑπέσχετο, καὶ προεῖπεν ὅτι φωραθήσεται κλέπτων καὶ δεθεὶς ἐνιαυτὸν οὕτω τὰς βόας λήψεται. μετὰ δὲ τὴν ὑπόσχεσιν εἰς Φυλάκην ἀπῄει καί, καθάπερ προεῖπε, φωραθεὶς ἐπὶ τῇ κλοπῇ δέσμιος 2 -- ἐν οἰκήματι ἐφυλάσσετο. λειπομένου δὲ τοῦ ἐνιαυτοῦ βραχέος χρόνου, τῶν κατὰ τὸ κρυφαῖον 3 -- τῆς στέγης σκωλήκων ἀκούει, τοῦ μὲν ἐρωτῶντος πόσον ἤδη μέρος τοῦ δοκοῦ διαβέβρωται, τῶν δὲ ἀποκρινομένων 4 -- λοιπὸν ἐλάχιστον εἶναι. καὶ ταχέως ἐκέλευσεν αὑτὸν εἰς ἕτερον οἴκημα μεταγαγεῖν, γενομένου δὲ τούτου μετʼ οὐ πολὺ συνέπεσε τὸ οἴκημα. θαυμάσας δὲ Φύλακος, καὶ μαθὼν ὅτι ἐστὶ μάντις ἄριστος, λύσας παρεκάλεσεν εἰπεῖν ὅπως αὐτοῦ τῷ παιδὶ Ἰφίκλῳ παῖδες γένωνται. ὁ δὲ ὑπέσχετο ἐφʼ ᾧ τὰς βόας λήψεται. καὶ καταθύσας ταύρους δύο καὶ μελίσας τοὺς οἰωνοὺς προσεκαλέσατο· παραγενομένου δὲ αἰγυπιοῦ, παρὰ τούτου μανθάνει δὴ ὅτι Φύλακός ποτε κριοὺς τέμνων ἐπὶ τῶν αἰδοίων 5 -- παρὰ τῷ Ἰφίκλῳ τὴν μάχαιραν ᾑμαγμένην ἔτι κατέθετο, δείσαντος δὲ τοῦ παιδὸς καὶ φυγόντος αὖθις κατὰ τῆς ἱερᾶς δρυὸς αὐτὴν ἔπηξε, καὶ ταύτην ἀμφιτροχάσας 1 -- ἐκάλυψεν ὁ φλοιός. ἔλεγεν οὖν, εὑρεθείσης τῆς μαχαίρας εἰ ξύων τὸν ἰὸν ἐπὶ ἡμέρας δέκα Ἰφίκλῳ δῷ πιεῖν, παῖδα γεννήσειν. ταῦτα μαθὼν παρʼ αἰγυπιοῦ Μελάμπους τὴν μὲν μάχαιραν εὗρε, τῷ δὲ Ἰφίκλῳ τὸν ἰὸν ξύσας ἐπὶ ἡμέρας δέκα δέδωκε πιεῖν, καὶ παῖς αὐτῷ Ποδάρκης ἐγένετο. τὰς δὲ βόας εἰς Πύλον ἤλασε, καὶ τῷ ἀδελφῷ τὴν Νηλέως θυγατέρα λαβὼν ἔδωκε. καὶ μέχρι μέν τινος ἐν Μεσσήνῃ κατῴκει, ὡς δὲ τὰς ἐν Ἄργει γυναῖκας ἐξέμηνε Διόνυσος, ἐπὶ 2 -- μέρει τῆς 3 -- βασιλείας ἰασάμενος αὐτὰς ἐκεῖ μετὰ Βίαντος κατῴκησε. 2.2.2. καὶ γίνεται Ἀκρισίῳ μὲν ἐξ Εὐρυδίκης τῆς Λακεδαίμονος Δανάη, Προίτῳ δὲ ἐκ Σθενεβοίας Λυσίππη καὶ Ἰφινόη καὶ Ἰφιάνασσα. αὗται δὲ ὡς ἐτελειώθησαν, ἐμάνησαν, ὡς μὲν Ἡσίοδός φησιν, ὅτι τὰς Διονύσου τελετὰς οὐ κατεδέχοντο, ὡς δὲ Ἀκουσίλαος λέγει, διότι τὸ τῆς Ἥρας ξόανον ἐξηυτέλισαν. γενόμεναι δὲ ἐμμανεῖς ἐπλανῶντο ἀνὰ τὴν Ἀργείαν ἅπασαν, αὖθις δὲ τὴν Ἀρκαδίαν καὶ τὴν Πελοπόννησον 1 -- διελθοῦσαι μετʼ ἀκοσμίας ἁπάσης διὰ τῆς ἐρημίας ἐτρόχαζον. Μελάμπους δὲ ὁ Ἀμυθάονος καὶ Εἰδομένης τῆς Ἄβαντος, μάντις ὢν καὶ τὴν διὰ φαρμάκων καὶ καθαρμῶν θεραπείαν πρῶτος εὑρηκώς, ὑπισχνεῖται θεραπεύειν τὰς παρθένους, εἰ λάβοι τὸ τρίτον μέρος τῆς δυναστείας. οὐκ ἐπιτρέποντος δὲ Προίτου θεραπεύειν ἐπὶ μισθοῖς τηλικούτοις, ἔτι μᾶλλον ἐμαίνοντο αἱ παρθένοι καὶ προσέτι μετὰ τούτων αἱ λοιπαὶ γυναῖκες· καὶ γὰρ αὗται τὰς οἰκίας ἀπολιποῦσαι τοὺς ἰδίους ἀπώλλυον παῖδας καὶ εἰς τὴν ἐρημίαν ἐφοίτων. προβαινούσης δὲ ἐπὶ πλεῖστον τῆς συμφορᾶς, τοὺς αἰτηθέντας μισθοὺς ὁ Προῖτος ἐδίδου. ὁ δὲ ὑπέσχετο θεραπεύειν ὅταν ἕτερον τοσοῦτον τῆς γῆς ὁ ἀδελφὸς αὐτοῦ λάβῃ Βίας. Προῖτος δὲ εὐλαβηθεὶς μὴ βραδυνούσης τῆς θεραπείας αἰτηθείη καὶ πλεῖον, θεραπεύειν συνεχώρησεν ἐπὶ τούτοις. Μελάμπους δὲ παραλαβὼν τοὺς δυνατωτάτους τῶν νεανιῶν μετʼ ἀλαλαγμοῦ καί τινος ἐνθέου χορείας ἐκ τῶν ὀρῶν αὐτὰς εἰς Σικυῶνα συνεδίωξε. κατὰ δὲ τὸν διωγμὸν ἡ πρεσβυτάτη τῶν θυγατέρων Ἰφινόη μετήλλαξεν· ταῖς δὲ λοιπαῖς τυχούσαις καθαρμῶν σωφρονῆσαι συνέβη. καὶ ταύτας μὲν ἐξέδοτο Προῖτος Μελάμποδι καὶ Βίαντι, παῖδα δʼ ὕστερον ἐγέννησε Μεγαπένθην. 3.6.2. Ἀμφιάραος δὲ ὁ Ὀικλέους, 1 -- μάντις ὢν καὶ προειδὼς ὅτι δεῖ πάντας τοὺς στρατευσαμένους χωρὶς Ἀδράστου τελευτῆσαι, αὐτός τε ὤκνει στρατεύεσθαι καὶ τοὺς λοιποὺς ἀπέτρεπε. Πολυνείκης δὲ ἀφικόμενος πρὸς Ἶφιν τὸν Ἀλέκτορος ἠξίου μαθεῖν πῶς ἂν Ἀμφιάραος ἀναγκασθείη στρατεύεσθαι· ὁ δὲ εἶπεν εἰ λάβοι τὸν ὅρμον Ἐριφύλη. Ἀμφιάραος μὲν οὖν ἀπεῖπεν Ἐριφύλῃ παρὰ Πολυνείκους δῶρα λαμβάνειν, Πολυνείκης δὲ δοὺς αὐτῇ τὸν ὅρμον ἠξίου τὸν Ἀμφιάραον πεῖσαι στρατεύειν. ἦν γὰρ ἐπὶ ταύτῃ· 1 -- γενομένης γὰρ †αὐτῆς 2 --πρὸς Ἄδραστον, διαλυσάμενος ὤμοσε, περὶ ὧν ἂν 3 -- Ἀδράστῳ 4 -- διαφέρηται, διακρίνειν Ἐριφύλῃ 5 -- συγχωρῆσαι. ὅτε οὖν ἐπὶ Θήβας ἔδει στρατεύειν, Ἀδράστου μὲν παρακαλοῦντος Ἀμφιαράου δὲ ἀποτρέποντος, Ἐριφύλη τὸν ὅρμον λαβοῦσα ἔπεισεν αὐτὸν σὺν Ἀδράστῳ 6 -- στρατεύειν. Ἀμφιάραος δὲ ἀνάγκην ἔχων στρατεύεσθαι τοῖς παισὶν ἐντολὰς ἔδωκε τελειωθεῖσι τήν τε μητέρα κτείνειν καὶ ἐπὶ Θήβας στρατεύειν. 3.7.7. δηλώσαντες δὲ τῇ μητρὶ ταῦτα, τόν τε ὅρμον καὶ τὸν πέπλον ἐλθόντες εἰς Δελφοὺς ἀνέθεντο κατὰ πρόσταξιν Ἀχελῴου. πορευθέντες δὲ εἰς τὴν Ἤπειρον συναθροίζουσιν οἰκήτορας καὶ κτίζουσιν Ἀκαρνανίαν. Εὐριπίδης δέ φησιν Ἀλκμαίωνα κατὰ τὸν τῆς μανίας χρόνον ἐκ Μαντοῦς Τειρεσίου παῖδας δύο γεννῆσαι, Ἀμφίλοχον καὶ θυγατέρα Τισιφόνην, κομίσαντα δὲ εἰς Κόρινθον τὰ βρέφη δοῦναι τρέφειν Κορινθίων βασιλεῖ Κρέοντι, καὶ τὴν μὲν Τισιφόνην διενεγκοῦσαν εὐμορφίᾳ ὑπὸ τῆς Κρέοντος γυναικὸς ἀπεμποληθῆναι, δεδοικυίας μὴ Κρέων αὐτὴν γαμετὴν ποιήσηται. τὸν δὲ Ἀλκμαίωνα ἀγοράσαντα ταύτην ἔχειν οὐκ εἰδότα τὴν ἑαυτοῦ θυγατέρα θεράπαιναν, παραγενόμενον δὲ εἰς Κόρινθον ἐπὶ τὴν τῶν τέκνων ἀπαίτησιν καὶ τὸν υἱὸν κομίσασθαι. καὶ Ἀμφίλοχος κατὰ χρησμοὺς Ἀπόλλωνος Ἀμφιλοχικὸν Ἄργος ᾤκισεν. 1 --
33. Arrian, Anabasis of Alexander, 2.3.3 (1st cent. CE

2.3.3. καί ποτε ἀροῦντος αὐτοῦ ἐπιστῆναι ἐπὶ τὸν ζυγὸν ἀετὸν καὶ ἐπιμεῖναι ἔστε ἐπὶ βουλυτὸν καθήμενον· τὸν δὲ ἐκπλαγέντα τῇ ὄψει ἰέναι κοινώσοντα ὑπὲρ τοῦ θείου παρὰ τοὺς Τελμισσέας τοὺς μάντεις· εἶναι γὰρ τοὺς Τελμισσέας σοφοὺς τὰ θεῖα ἐξηγεῖσθαι καὶ σφισιν ἀπὸ γένους δεδόσθαι αὐτοῖς καὶ γυναιξὶν καὶ παισὶ τὴν μαντείαν.
34. Plutarch, Lysander, 22.5-22.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

35. Plutarch, Pericles, 38.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

38.2. Certain it is that Theophrastus, in his Ethics, querying whether one’s character follows the bent of one’s fortunes and is forced by bodily sufferings to abandon its high excellence, records this fact, that Pericles, as he lay sick, showed one of his friends who was come to see him an amulet that the women had hung round his neck, as much as to say that he was very badly off to put up with such folly as that.
36. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.25.9, 2.31.2, 2.31.10, 3.11.5-3.11.10, 5.5.10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.25.9. Going down seawards, you come to the chambers of the daughters of Proetus. On returning to the highway you will reach Medea on the left hand. They say that Electryon, the father of Alcmena, was king of Medea, but in my time nothing was left of it except the foundations. 2.31.2. In this temple are altars to the gods said to rule under the earth. It is here that they say Semele was brought out of Hell by Dionysus, and that Heracles dragged up the Hound of Hell. Cerberus, the fabulous watch-dog. But I cannot bring myself to believe even that Semele died at all, seeing that she was the wife of Zeus; while, as for the so-called Hound of Hell, I will give my views in another place. Paus. 3.25.6 . 2.31.10. Here there is also a Hermes called Polygius. Against this image, they say, Heracles leaned his club. Now this club, which was of wild olive, taking root in the earth (if anyone cares to believe the story), grew up again and is still alive; Heracles, they say, discovering the wild olive by the Saronic Sea, cut a club from it. There is also a sanctuary of Zeus surnamed Saviour, which, they say, was made by Aetius, the son of Anthas, when he was king. To a water they give the name River of Gold. They say that when the land was afflicted with a drought for nine years, during which no rain fell, all the other waters dried up, but this River of Gold even then continued to flow as before. 3.11.5. At the altar of Augustus they show a bronze statue of Agias. This Agias, they say, by divining for Lysander captured the Athenian fleet at Aegospotami with the exception of ten ships of war. 405 B.C. These made their escape to Cyprus ; all the rest the Lacedaemonians captured along with their crews. Agias was a son of Agelochus, a son of Tisamenus. 3.11.6. Tisamenus belonged to the family of the Iamidae at Elis, and an oracle was given to him that he should win five most famous contests. So he trained for the pentathlon at Olympia, but came away defeated. And yet he was first in two events, beating Hieronymus of Andros in running and in jumping. But when he lost the wrestling bout to this competitor, and so missed the prize, he understood what the oracle meant, that the god granted him to win five contests in war by his divinations. 3.11.7. The Lacedaemonians, hearing of the oracle the Pythian priestess had given to Tisamenus, persuaded him to migrate from Elis and to be state-diviner at Sparta . And Tisamenus won them five contests in war. 479 B.C. The first was at Plataea against the Persians; the second was at Tegea, when the Lacedaemonians had engaged the Tegeans and Argives; the third was at Dipaea, an Arcadian town in Maenalia, when all the Arcadians except the Mantineans were arrayed against them. 3.11.8. His fourth contest was against the Helots who had rebelled and left the Isthmus for Ithome . 464 B.C. Not all the Helots revolted, only the Messenian element, which separated itself off from the old Helots. These events I shall relate presently. On the occasion I mention the Lacedaemonians allowed the rebels to depart under a truce, in accordance with the advice of Tisamenus and of the oracle at Delphi . The last time Tisamenus divined for them was at Tanagra, an engagement taking place with the Argives and Athenians. 457 B.C. 3.11.9. Such I learned was the history of Tisamenus. On their market-place the Spartans have images of Apollo Pythaeus, of Artemis and of Leto. The whole of this region is called Choros (Dancing), because at the Gymnopaediae, a festival which the Lacedaemonians take more seriously than any other, the lads perform dances in honor of Apollo. Not far from them is a sanctuary of Earth and of Zeus of the Market-place, another of Athena of the Market-place and of Poseidon surnamed Securer, and likewise one of Apollo and of Hera. 3.11.10. There is also dedicated a colossal statue of the Spartan People. The Lacedaemonians have also a sanctuary of the Fates, by which is the grave of Orestes, son of Agamemnon. For when the bones of Orestes were brought from Tegea in accordance with an oracle they were buried here. Beside the grave of Orestes is a statue of Polydorus, son of Alcamenes, a king who rose to such honor that the magistrates seal with his likeness everything that requires sealing. 5.5.10. others that Pylenor, another Centaur, when shot by Heracles fled wounded to this river and washed his hurt in it, and that it was the hydra's poison which gave the Anigrus its nasty smell. Others again attribute the quality of the river to Melampus the son of Amythaon, who threw into it the means he used to purify the daughters of Proetus.
37. Callimachus, Hymns, 2.1

38. Epigraphy, Seg, 28.1245, 29.361, 35.626



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneas the tactician Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
aeschylus, delineating worshipping communities Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
aetiologies, specific, apollo pythaieus (asine) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
agios, tisamenos grandson Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
aigospotami Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
aigosthena Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 144
akte (seaboard of argolid), and argos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
akte (seaboard of argolid), tradition of ethnic integration in cult Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
akte (seaboard of argolid) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
alkmene Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
amphiaraos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
amphiaraus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
amphilochos, as founder of argos amphilochikon Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 75
apoikia (settlement abroad, colony), oracles at Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
apoikia (settlement abroad, colony), story type of archaic Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
apollo Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 144
apollo (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 482
apollo pythaieus, at asine, aetiology Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
apollo pythaieus, at asine, oracle at Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
apollo pythaieus, at asine, song for Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
apollo pythaieus, at asine Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
apollo pythios (delphi), and colonization Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
apollo pythios (delphi), argive plain Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
apollo pythios (delphi), argolid Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137, 172
apollo pythios (delphi), elites in Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
apollo pythios (delphi), reconfiguration of myths and rituals in song Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
argives Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 201
argos, and akte Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
argos, and argive plain Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
argos, blending traditions of akhaian and the seven Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
argos, reconfiguring myths and rituals of the argive plain Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
argos Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 201; Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 145; Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137, 172
aristandros Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
asine Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
baal-shamem Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 134
balaam Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 134, 144, 145
bias Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 144
bremmer, jan n. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 482
calchas Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173
callimachus/callimachos/kallimachos Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 144
cassandra Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 144
cattle-raid Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 200
chorus, khoros, as religious offering Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
chrêsmologos Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
coinage, delphi and Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
colonial narrative, absence of delphi in Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 74
colonial narrative, odyssey as Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 59
cultural appropriation, egyptians and Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 85
cultural interconnection, greek-egyptian Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 85
cultural memory, oracles and divination Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 482
cupid-apollo quarrel Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 144
cupid Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 144
daphne Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 144
delphi, absence in colonial narratives Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 74
dillery, john Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
dionysos Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 145
diopeithes Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
distinct from dorians and ionians, ethnic stereotyping of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
divination, and authority Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
divination, and patronage Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
ekroth, gunnel Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 482
elijah Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 134
elisha Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 134
elites, and the polis Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
elites, caught between aristocracy and democracy Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
erotic context Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 144
ethnic, integration in ritual and cult Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
ethnic, stereotyping Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
foundation legends, thebes Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 85
fowler, robert Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 482
genealogy, use of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 55, 56, 57, 58, 59
haziyin Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 134
hector Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173
helenos Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 144
hera Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 145
hermes, as cattle thief Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 144
hermes (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 482
hero-cult Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
hierokles Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
home Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 201
homer, iliad Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
homer, odyssey Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 482
homer Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 200; Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173
homeric hymns, hermes Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 482
homeric hymns Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 144
iphicles Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 144
iphiclus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 200
johnston, sarah iles Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 482
kings, two Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 145
kleos Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 59
mania, and social class/status Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
mania, family genealogies of Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
mania Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
mantis Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 134
marriage Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 200
megistias Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
melampodidae Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 134
melampodidai Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 74
melampodids Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
melampous Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 134, 144, 145
melampus, anscestors of Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
melampus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 200, 201; Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173
melampus of pylos Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 85
memories, kept alive or evoked in ritual, contested, of conflict Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
midea (city), alkmene Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
midea (city), herakles at Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
migrations, myths of, fostered in ritual practice Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
mobility, of populations Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
mopsus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 134, 144, 145
mykenai (classical city), herakles Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
neleus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 200, 201; Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 144
odysseus, hidden identity of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 57, 58, 59
odysseus, parallels between theoklymenos and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 55, 56, 57, 58, 59
odyssey Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 200
oracles, and collective purification Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
oracles, divination' Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 482
oracles, in war situations Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
ovid, amores Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 144
ovid, fasti Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 144
ovid Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 144
palace Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 200
pausanias Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 482
performances of myth and ritual (also song), (re)creation of worshipping groups Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
performances of myth and ritual (also song), embracing social change Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
performances of myth and ritual (also song), ethnic integration in Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
pero Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 200, 201; Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 144
perseus, legends of Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 85
philochoros, on divination Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
phoenicia and phoenicians Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 85
phylace Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 144
phylakus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 200, 201
pindar Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 174
plato, diotima (in symposion) Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
pollution (miasma), of community Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
polydamas Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173
polykrates of samos Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
presence Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 201
proitos Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 145; Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
prophets Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 134
prosodion Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
purification Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
pylian epos Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 200
pylos Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 200, 201; Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 145
religion, greek, general considerations Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
satyra of larissa Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
seers, redundancy with oikist Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 74
seers Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 134, 144, 145
separatism, egyptian Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 85
social change, and myth Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
social change, memory of maintained in religious practice Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
stasis, melampodidai and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 74
sthorys of thasos Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
sybil, the Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
symmachos Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
synoikism, and myth-ritual network reconfigured in song Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
teiresias Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173
telenikos Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
thebes and thebans, foundation legend Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 85
theoclymenus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 134; Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173
theoklymenos, genealogy of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 55, 56, 57, 58
theoklymenos, hidden identity of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 55, 56, 57, 58, 59
theoklymenos, parallels between odysseus and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 55, 56, 57, 58, 59
theoxenia, argos/tiryns Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
tiryns, divinities of turning argive through song Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
tiryns Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 145
troizen Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
victor, of epinikian odes, protected by local deity Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 172
votives, votive offerings, as collective punishment Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
wilamowitz, u. v. Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 174
xenophon, on seers Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 253
zakkur Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 134
zeus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 200
zeus (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 482