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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 15.223-15.257
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μάντις· ἀτὰρ γενεήν γε Μελάμποδος ἔκγονος ἦενHe was a seer, but sprung from the line of Melampus, who once upon a time had lived in Pylos, mother of sheep, a wealthy one who lived in a great preeminent house in Pylos. Eventually he went to a kingdom of other men, fleeing his fatherland and great-hearted Neleus, most illustrious of living men
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ὅς οἱ χρήματα πολλὰ τελεσφόρον εἰς ἐνιαυτὸνwho for a full year had kept much wealth from him by violence. Meanwhile Melampus, in the palace of Phylacus, was bound in grievous bonds and suffered mighty sorrows because of Neleus' daughter and the deep infatuation that a goddess, the house-wrecker Erinys, laid upon his mind.
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ἀλλʼ ὁ μὲν ἔκφυγε κῆρα καὶ ἤλασε βοῦς ἐριμύκουςBut he escaped doom, and drove loud-bellowing cattlefrom Phylace to Pylos, and made godlike Neleus pay for his shameful deed, then led the woman to his home for his brother, but Melampus went to the kingdom of other men, to horse-grazing Argos, for it was now fated for him there
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ναιέμεναι πολλοῖσιν ἀνάσσοντʼ Ἀργείοισινthat he live as ruler over many Argives. There he married a woman and built a high-roofed house, then fathered Antiphates and Mantius, two mighty sons. Antiphates fathered great-hearted Oicles; then Oicles, the rouser of men Amphiaraus
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ὃν περὶ κῆρι φίλει Ζεύς τʼ αἰγίοχος καὶ Ἀπόλλωνwhom Aegis-bearer Zeus loved exceedingly in his heart and Apolloloved with all kinds of affection. But he didn't reach old age's threshold, but perished in Thebes because of a gifts made to a woman. His sons were Alcmaeon and Amphilochus. Mantius in turn fathered Polypheides and Cleitus.
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ἀλλʼ ἦ τοι Κλεῖτον χρυσόθρονος ἥρπασεν ἨὼςBut, yes, indeed, golden-throned Dawn snatched Cleitusbecause of his beauty, so he might be among immortals, then Apollo made a seer of high-spirited Polypheides, best by far of mortals, after Amphiaraus died. In anger at his father, he moved away to Hyperesia.
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ἔνθʼ ὅ γε ναιετάων μαντεύετο πᾶσι βροτοῖσιν.There he lived and to all mortals prophesied. This one's son came, and Theoclymenus was his name, the one who then stood near Telemachus. He found him as he made libation and prayed beside his swift black ship, and, voicing winged words, said to him:
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 3.302, 6.297-6.310, 9.223-9.225 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3.302. /may their brains be thus poured forth upon the ground even as this wine, theirs and their children's; and may their wives be made slaves to others. 6.297. /and shone like a star, and lay undermost of all. Then she went her way, and the throng of aged wives hastened after her. 6.298. /and shone like a star, and lay undermost of all. Then she went her way, and the throng of aged wives hastened after her. 6.299. /and shone like a star, and lay undermost of all. Then she went her way, and the throng of aged wives hastened after her. Now when they were come to the temple of Athene in the citadel, the doors were opened for them by fair-cheeked Theano, daughter of Cisseus, the wife of Antenor, tamer of horses; 6.300. /for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene. Then with sacred cries they all lifted up their hands to Athene; and fair-cheeked Theano took the robe and laid it upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and with vows made prayer to the daughter of great Zeus: 6.301. /for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene. Then with sacred cries they all lifted up their hands to Athene; and fair-cheeked Theano took the robe and laid it upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and with vows made prayer to the daughter of great Zeus: 6.302. /for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene. Then with sacred cries they all lifted up their hands to Athene; and fair-cheeked Theano took the robe and laid it upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and with vows made prayer to the daughter of great Zeus: 6.303. /for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene. Then with sacred cries they all lifted up their hands to Athene; and fair-cheeked Theano took the robe and laid it upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and with vows made prayer to the daughter of great Zeus: 6.304. /for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene. Then with sacred cries they all lifted up their hands to Athene; and fair-cheeked Theano took the robe and laid it upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and with vows made prayer to the daughter of great Zeus: 6.305. / Lady Athene, that dost guard our city, fairest among goddesses, break now the spear of Diomedes, and grant furthermore that himself may fall headlong before the Scaean gates; to the end that we may now forthwith sacrifice to thee in thy temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad, if thou wilt take pity 6.306. / Lady Athene, that dost guard our city, fairest among goddesses, break now the spear of Diomedes, and grant furthermore that himself may fall headlong before the Scaean gates; to the end that we may now forthwith sacrifice to thee in thy temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad, if thou wilt take pity 6.307. / Lady Athene, that dost guard our city, fairest among goddesses, break now the spear of Diomedes, and grant furthermore that himself may fall headlong before the Scaean gates; to the end that we may now forthwith sacrifice to thee in thy temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad, if thou wilt take pity 6.308. / Lady Athene, that dost guard our city, fairest among goddesses, break now the spear of Diomedes, and grant furthermore that himself may fall headlong before the Scaean gates; to the end that we may now forthwith sacrifice to thee in thy temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad, if thou wilt take pity 6.309. / Lady Athene, that dost guard our city, fairest among goddesses, break now the spear of Diomedes, and grant furthermore that himself may fall headlong before the Scaean gates; to the end that we may now forthwith sacrifice to thee in thy temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad, if thou wilt take pity 6.310. /on Troy and the Trojans' wives and their little children. So spake she praying, but Pallas Athene denied the prayer.Thus were these praying to the daughter of great Zeus, but Hector went his way to the palace of Alexander, the fair palace that himself had builded with the men 9.223. /and Patroclus cast burnt-offering into the fire. So they put forth their hands to the good cheer lying ready before them. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, Aias nodded to Phoenix; and goodly Odysseus was ware thereof, and filling a cup with wine he pledged Achilles: 9.224. /and Patroclus cast burnt-offering into the fire. So they put forth their hands to the good cheer lying ready before them. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, Aias nodded to Phoenix; and goodly Odysseus was ware thereof, and filling a cup with wine he pledged Achilles: 9.225. / Hail, O Achilles, of the equal feast have we no stinting, either in the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, or now in thine; for here is abundance that satisfies the heart to feast withal. Yet matters of the delicious feast are not in our thoughts, nay, Zeus-nurtured one, it is utter ruin that we behold, and are afraid;
2. Homer, Odyssey, 1.68-1.73, 3.273-3.275, 7.53-7.59, 9.19-9.20, 9.231-9.232, 15.224-15.258, 15.260, 15.271-15.278, 20.351-20.370 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Acusilaus, Fragments, 28 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

4. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1055-1057, 91, 1054 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1054. πιθοῦ λιποῦσα τόνδʼ ἁμαξήρη θρόνον. Κλυταιμήστρα 1054. Obey thou, leaving this thy car-enthronement! KLUTAIMNESTRA.
5. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 87 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

87. τί φῶ χέουσα τάσδε κηδείους χοάς;
6. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 18 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. ἵζει τέταρτον τοῖσδε μάντιν ἐν θρόνοις·
7. Aeschylus, Persians, 206-208, 205 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

205. ὁρῶ δὲ φεύγοντʼ αἰετὸν πρὸς ἐσχάραν 205. But I saw an eagle fleeing for safety to the altar of Phoebus—and out of terror, my friends, I stood speechless. Thereupon I caught sight of a falcon rushing at full speed with outstretched wings and with his talons plucking at the head of the eagle, which did nothing but cower and
8. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 6 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Electra, 171 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

171. ἀγγέλλει δ' ὅτι νῦν τριταί-
10. Herodotus, Histories, 1.50, 6.81-6.82, 6.108.4, 6.111.2, 7.117, 7.178, 7.189, 7.191, 7.219, 8.54, 8.122, 9.33.1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.50. After this, he tried to win the favor of the Delphian god with great sacrifices. He offered up three thousand beasts from all the kinds fit for sacrifice, and on a great pyre burnt couches covered with gold and silver, golden goblets, and purple cloaks and tunics; by these means he hoped the better to win the aid of the god, to whom he also commanded that every Lydian sacrifice what he could. ,When the sacrifice was over, he melted down a vast store of gold and made ingots of it, the longer sides of which were of six and the shorter of three palms' length, and the height was one palm. There were a hundred and seventeen of these. Four of them were of refined gold, each weighing two talents and a half; the rest were of gold with silver alloy, each of two talents' weight. ,He also had a figure of a lion made of refined gold, weighing ten talents. When the temple of Delphi was burnt, this lion fell from the ingots which were the base on which it stood; and now it is in the treasury of the Corinthians, but weighs only six talents and a half, for the fire melted away three and a half talents. 6.81. Then Cleomenes sent most of his army back to Sparta, while he himself took a thousand of the best warriors and went to the temple of Hera to sacrifice. When he wished to sacrifice at the altar the priest forbade him, saying that it was not holy for a stranger to sacrifice there. Cleomenes ordered the helots to carry the priest away from the altar and whip him, and he performed the sacrifice. After doing this, he returned to Sparta. 6.82. But after his return his enemies brought him before the ephors, saying that he had been bribed not to take Argos when he might have easily taken it. Cleomenes alleged (whether falsely or truly, I cannot rightly say; but this he alleged in his speech) that he had supposed the god's oracle to be fulfilled by his taking of the temple of Argus; therefore he had thought it best not to make any attempt on the city before he had learned from the sacrifices whether the god would deliver it to him or withstand him; ,when he was taking omens in Hera's temple a flame of fire had shone forth from the breast of the image, and so he learned the truth of the matter, that he would not take Argos. If the flame had come out of the head of the image, he would have taken the city from head to foot utterly; but its coming from the breast signified that he had done as much as the god willed to happen. This plea of his seemed to the Spartans to be credible and reasonable, and he far outdistanced the pursuit of his accusers. 6.108.4. So the Lacedaemonians gave this advice to the Plataeans, who did not disobey it. When the Athenians were making sacrifices to the twelve gods, they sat at the altar as suppliants and put themselves under protection. When the Thebans heard this, they marched against the Plataeans, but the Athenians came to their aid. 6.111.2. Ever since that battle, when the Athenians are conducting sacrifices at the festivals every fourth year, the Athenian herald prays for good things for the Athenians and Plataeans together. 7.117. While Xerxes was at Acanthus, it happened that Artachaees, overseer of the digging of the canal, died of an illness. He was high in Xerxes' favor, an Achaemenid by lineage, and the tallest man in Persia, lacking four finger-breadths of five royal cubits in stature, and his voice was the loudest on earth. For this reason Xerxes mourned him greatly and gave him a funeral and burial of great pomp, and the whole army poured libations on his tomb. ,The Acanthians hold Artachaees a hero, and sacrifice to him, calling upon his name. This they do at the command of an oracle. 7.178. So with all speed the Greeks went their several ways to meet the enemy. In the meantime, the Delphians, who were afraid for themselves and for Hellas, consulted the god. They were advised to pray to the winds, for these would be potent allies for Hellas. ,When they had received the oracle, the Delphians first sent word of it to those Greeks who desired to be free; because of their dread of the barbarian, they were forever grateful. Subsequently they erected an altar to the winds at Thyia, the present location of the precinct of Thyia the daughter of Cephisus, and they offered sacrifices to them. This, then, is the reason why the Delphians to this day offer the winds sacrifice of propitiation. 7.189. The story is told that because of an oracle the Athenians invoked Boreas, the north wind, to help them, since another oracle told them to summon their son-in-law as an ally. According to the Hellenic story, Boreas had an Attic wife, Orithyia, the daughter of Erechtheus, ancient king of Athens. ,Because of this connection, so the tale goes, the Athenians considered Boreas to be their son-in-law. They were stationed off Chalcis in Euboea, and when they saw the storm rising, they then, if they had not already, sacrificed to and called upon Boreas and Orithyia to help them by destroying the barbarian fleet, just as before at Athos. ,I cannot say whether this was the cause of Boreas falling upon the barbarians as they lay at anchor, but the Athenians say that he had come to their aid before and that he was the agent this time. When they went home, they founded a sacred precinct of Boreas beside the Ilissus river. 7.191. There was no counting how many grain-ships and other vessels were destroyed. The generals of the fleet were afraid that the Thessalians might attack them now that they had been defeated, so they built a high palisade out of the wreckage. ,The storm lasted three days. Finally the Magi made offerings and cast spells upon the wind, sacrificing also to Thetis and the Nereids. In this way they made the wind stop on the fourth day—or perhaps it died down on its own. They sacrificed to Thetis after hearing from the Ionians the story that it was from this place that Peleus had carried her off and that all the headland of Sepia belonged to her and to the other Nereids. 7.219. The seer Megistias, examining the sacrifices, first told the Hellenes at Thermopylae that death was coming to them with the dawn. Then deserters came who announced the circuit made by the Persians. These gave their signals while it was still night; a third report came from the watchers running down from the heights at dawn. ,The Hellenes then took counsel, but their opinions were divided. Some advised not to leave their post, but others spoke against them. They eventually parted, some departing and dispersing each to their own cities, others preparing to remain there with Leonidas. 8.54. So it was that Xerxes took complete possession of Athens, and he sent a horseman to Susa to announce his present success to Artabanus. On the day after the messenger was sent, he called together the Athenian exiles who accompanied him and asked them go up to the acropolis and perform sacrifices in their customary way, an order given because he had been inspired by a dream or because he felt remorse after burning the sacred precinct. The Athenian exiles did as they were commanded. 8.122. Having sent the first-fruits to Delphi, the Greeks, in the name of the country generally, made inquiry of the god whether the first-fruits which he had received were of full measure and whether he was content. To this he said that he was content with what he had received from all other Greeks, but not from the Aeginetans. From these he demanded the victor's prize for the sea-fight of Salamis. When the Aeginetans learned that, they dedicated three golden stars which are set on a bronze mast, in the angle, nearest to Croesus' bowl. 9.33.1. On the second day after they had all been arrayed according to their nations and their battalions, both armies offered sacrifice. It was Tisamenus who sacrificed for the Greeks, for he was with their army as a diviner; he was an Elean by birth, a Clytiad of the Iamid clan, and the Lacedaemonians gave him the freedom of their city.
11. Sophocles, Ajax, 712-713, 220 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Sophocles, Antigone, 1001-1022, 999-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Sophocles, Electra, 281, 637-659, 280 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 14-19, 2, 20-22, 3-5, 911-923, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Cicero, On Divination, 1.91 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.91. nec quisquam rex Persarum potest esse, qui non ante magorum disciplinam scientiamque perceperit. Licet autem videre et genera quaedam et nationes huic scientiae deditas. Telmessus in Caria est, qua in urbe excellit haruspicum disciplina; itemque Elis in Peloponneso familias duas certas habet, Iamidarum unam, alteram Clutidarum, haruspicinae nobilitate praestantes. In Syria Chaldaei cognitione astrorum sollertiaque ingeniorum antecellunt. 1.91. Indeed, no one can become king of the Persians until he has learned the theory and the practice of the magi. Moreover, you may see whole families and tribes devoted to this art. For example, Telmessus in Caria is a city noted for its cultivation of the soothsayers art, and there is also Elis in Peloponnesus, which has permanently set aside two families as soothsayers, the Iamidae and the Clutidae, who are distinguished for superior skill in their art. In Syria the Chaldeans are pre-eminent for their knowledge of astronomy and for their quickness of mind.
16. Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 70, 128 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

17. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 2.2.2, 3.6.2, 3.7.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.2.2. καὶ γίνεται Ἀκρισίῳ μὲν ἐξ Εὐρυδίκης τῆς Λακεδαίμονος Δανάη, Προίτῳ δὲ ἐκ Σθενεβοίας Λυσίππη καὶ Ἰφινόη καὶ Ἰφιάνασσα. αὗται δὲ ὡς ἐτελειώθησαν, ἐμάνησαν, ὡς μὲν Ἡσίοδός φησιν, ὅτι τὰς Διονύσου τελετὰς οὐ κατεδέχοντο, ὡς δὲ Ἀκουσίλαος λέγει, διότι τὸ τῆς Ἥρας ξόανον ἐξηυτέλισαν. γενόμεναι δὲ ἐμμανεῖς ἐπλανῶντο ἀνὰ τὴν Ἀργείαν ἅπασαν, αὖθις δὲ τὴν Ἀρκαδίαν καὶ τὴν Πελοπόννησον 1 -- διελθοῦσαι μετʼ ἀκοσμίας ἁπάσης διὰ τῆς ἐρημίας ἐτρόχαζον. Μελάμπους δὲ ὁ Ἀμυθάονος καὶ Εἰδομένης τῆς Ἄβαντος, μάντις ὢν καὶ τὴν διὰ φαρμάκων καὶ καθαρμῶν θεραπείαν πρῶτος εὑρηκώς, ὑπισχνεῖται θεραπεύειν τὰς παρθένους, εἰ λάβοι τὸ τρίτον μέρος τῆς δυναστείας. οὐκ ἐπιτρέποντος δὲ Προίτου θεραπεύειν ἐπὶ μισθοῖς τηλικούτοις, ἔτι μᾶλλον ἐμαίνοντο αἱ παρθένοι καὶ προσέτι μετὰ τούτων αἱ λοιπαὶ γυναῖκες· καὶ γὰρ αὗται τὰς οἰκίας ἀπολιποῦσαι τοὺς ἰδίους ἀπώλλυον παῖδας καὶ εἰς τὴν ἐρημίαν ἐφοίτων. προβαινούσης δὲ ἐπὶ πλεῖστον τῆς συμφορᾶς, τοὺς αἰτηθέντας μισθοὺς ὁ Προῖτος ἐδίδου. ὁ δὲ ὑπέσχετο θεραπεύειν ὅταν ἕτερον τοσοῦτον τῆς γῆς ὁ ἀδελφὸς αὐτοῦ λάβῃ Βίας. Προῖτος δὲ εὐλαβηθεὶς μὴ βραδυνούσης τῆς θεραπείας αἰτηθείη καὶ πλεῖον, θεραπεύειν συνεχώρησεν ἐπὶ τούτοις. Μελάμπους δὲ παραλαβὼν τοὺς δυνατωτάτους τῶν νεανιῶν μετʼ ἀλαλαγμοῦ καί τινος ἐνθέου χορείας ἐκ τῶν ὀρῶν αὐτὰς εἰς Σικυῶνα συνεδίωξε. κατὰ δὲ τὸν διωγμὸν ἡ πρεσβυτάτη τῶν θυγατέρων Ἰφινόη μετήλλαξεν· ταῖς δὲ λοιπαῖς τυχούσαις καθαρμῶν σωφρονῆσαι συνέβη. καὶ ταύτας μὲν ἐξέδοτο Προῖτος Μελάμποδι καὶ Βίαντι, παῖδα δʼ ὕστερον ἐγέννησε Μεγαπένθην. 3.6.2. Ἀμφιάραος δὲ ὁ Ὀικλέους, 1 -- μάντις ὢν καὶ προειδὼς ὅτι δεῖ πάντας τοὺς στρατευσαμένους χωρὶς Ἀδράστου τελευτῆσαι, αὐτός τε ὤκνει στρατεύεσθαι καὶ τοὺς λοιποὺς ἀπέτρεπε. Πολυνείκης δὲ ἀφικόμενος πρὸς Ἶφιν τὸν Ἀλέκτορος ἠξίου μαθεῖν πῶς ἂν Ἀμφιάραος ἀναγκασθείη στρατεύεσθαι· ὁ δὲ εἶπεν εἰ λάβοι τὸν ὅρμον Ἐριφύλη. Ἀμφιάραος μὲν οὖν ἀπεῖπεν Ἐριφύλῃ παρὰ Πολυνείκους δῶρα λαμβάνειν, Πολυνείκης δὲ δοὺς αὐτῇ τὸν ὅρμον ἠξίου τὸν Ἀμφιάραον πεῖσαι στρατεύειν. ἦν γὰρ ἐπὶ ταύτῃ· 1 -- γενομένης γὰρ †αὐτῆς 2 --πρὸς Ἄδραστον, διαλυσάμενος ὤμοσε, περὶ ὧν ἂν 3 -- Ἀδράστῳ 4 -- διαφέρηται, διακρίνειν Ἐριφύλῃ 5 -- συγχωρῆσαι. ὅτε οὖν ἐπὶ Θήβας ἔδει στρατεύειν, Ἀδράστου μὲν παρακαλοῦντος Ἀμφιαράου δὲ ἀποτρέποντος, Ἐριφύλη τὸν ὅρμον λαβοῦσα ἔπεισεν αὐτὸν σὺν Ἀδράστῳ 6 -- στρατεύειν. Ἀμφιάραος δὲ ἀνάγκην ἔχων στρατεύεσθαι τοῖς παισὶν ἐντολὰς ἔδωκε τελειωθεῖσι τήν τε μητέρα κτείνειν καὶ ἐπὶ Θήβας στρατεύειν. 3.7.7. δηλώσαντες δὲ τῇ μητρὶ ταῦτα, τόν τε ὅρμον καὶ τὸν πέπλον ἐλθόντες εἰς Δελφοὺς ἀνέθεντο κατὰ πρόσταξιν Ἀχελῴου. πορευθέντες δὲ εἰς τὴν Ἤπειρον συναθροίζουσιν οἰκήτορας καὶ κτίζουσιν Ἀκαρνανίαν. Εὐριπίδης δέ φησιν Ἀλκμαίωνα κατὰ τὸν τῆς μανίας χρόνον ἐκ Μαντοῦς Τειρεσίου παῖδας δύο γεννῆσαι, Ἀμφίλοχον καὶ θυγατέρα Τισιφόνην, κομίσαντα δὲ εἰς Κόρινθον τὰ βρέφη δοῦναι τρέφειν Κορινθίων βασιλεῖ Κρέοντι, καὶ τὴν μὲν Τισιφόνην διενεγκοῦσαν εὐμορφίᾳ ὑπὸ τῆς Κρέοντος γυναικὸς ἀπεμποληθῆναι, δεδοικυίας μὴ Κρέων αὐτὴν γαμετὴν ποιήσηται. τὸν δὲ Ἀλκμαίωνα ἀγοράσαντα ταύτην ἔχειν οὐκ εἰδότα τὴν ἑαυτοῦ θυγατέρα θεράπαιναν, παραγενόμενον δὲ εἰς Κόρινθον ἐπὶ τὴν τῶν τέκνων ἀπαίτησιν καὶ τὸν υἱὸν κομίσασθαι. καὶ Ἀμφίλοχος κατὰ χρησμοὺς Ἀπόλλωνος Ἀμφιλοχικὸν Ἄργος ᾤκισεν. 1 --
18. Arrian, Anabasis of Alexander, 2.3.3 (1st cent. CE

2.3.3. καί ποτε ἀροῦντος αὐτοῦ ἐπιστῆναι ἐπὶ τὸν ζυγὸν ἀετὸν καὶ ἐπιμεῖναι ἔστε ἐπὶ βουλυτὸν καθήμενον· τὸν δὲ ἐκπλαγέντα τῇ ὄψει ἰέναι κοινώσοντα ὑπὲρ τοῦ θείου παρὰ τοὺς Τελμισσέας τοὺς μάντεις· εἶναι γὰρ τοὺς Τελμισσέας σοφοὺς τὰ θεῖα ἐξηγεῖσθαι καὶ σφισιν ἀπὸ γένους δεδόσθαι αὐτοῖς καὶ γυναιξὶν καὶ παισὶ τὴν μαντείαν.
19. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.31.2, 2.31.10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.31.2. In this temple are altars to the gods said to rule under the earth. It is here that they say Semele was brought out of Hell by Dionysus, and that Heracles dragged up the Hound of Hell. Cerberus, the fabulous watch-dog. But I cannot bring myself to believe even that Semele died at all, seeing that she was the wife of Zeus; while, as for the so-called Hound of Hell, I will give my views in another place. Paus. 3.25.6 . 2.31.10. Here there is also a Hermes called Polygius. Against this image, they say, Heracles leaned his club. Now this club, which was of wild olive, taking root in the earth (if anyone cares to believe the story), grew up again and is still alive; Heracles, they say, discovering the wild olive by the Saronic Sea, cut a club from it. There is also a sanctuary of Zeus surnamed Saviour, which, they say, was made by Aetius, the son of Anthas, when he was king. To a water they give the name River of Gold. They say that when the land was afflicted with a drought for nine years, during which no rain fell, all the other waters dried up, but this River of Gold even then continued to flow as before.


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achaeans Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
aegina Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
aeschylus, delineating worshipping communities Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
aeschylus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
aetiologies, specific, apollo pythaieus (asine) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
agamemnon Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
ajax Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
akte (seaboard of argolid), and argos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
akte (seaboard of argolid), tradition of ethnic integration in cult Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
akte (seaboard of argolid) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
amphiaraos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
amphiaraus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
amphilochos, as founder of argos amphilochikon Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 75
apoikia (settlement abroad, colony), oracles at Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
apoikia (settlement abroad, colony), story type of archaic Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
apollo Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
apollo pythaieus, at asine, aetiology Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
apollo pythaieus, at asine, oracle at Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
apollo pythaieus, at asine, song for Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
apollo pythaieus, at asine Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
apollo pythios (delphi), and colonization Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
apollo pythios (delphi), argolid Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
argos, and akte Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
argos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
asine Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
atossa Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
calchas Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173
chorus, khoros, as religious offering Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
chrêsmologos Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
cleombrotus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
coinage, delphi and Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
colonial narrative, absence of delphi in Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 74
colonial narrative, odyssey as Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 59
croesus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
delphi, absence in colonial narratives Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 74
delphic Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
dillery, john Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
distinct from dorians and ionians, ethnic stereotyping of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
divination, and authority Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
divination, and patronage Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
ethnic, integration in ritual and cult Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
ethnic, stereotyping Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
genealogy, use of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 55, 56, 57, 58, 59
hector Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173
hera Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
herodotus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
homer Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173
kleos Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 59
lycian Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
mania, and social class/status Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
mania, family genealogies of Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
mania Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
melampodidai Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 74
melampus, anscestors of Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173, 174
melampus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173
memories, kept alive or evoked in ritual, contested, of conflict Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
migrations, myths of, fostered in ritual practice Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
mobility, of populations Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
mycenae Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
odysseus, hidden identity of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 57, 58, 59
odysseus, parallels between theoklymenos and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 55, 56, 57, 58, 59
oracles, and collective purification Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
oracles, in war situations Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
performances of myth and ritual (also song), ethnic integration in Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
pindar Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 174
plataea Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
pollution (miasma), of community Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
polydamas Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173
purification Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
religion, greek, general considerations Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
sacrifiant Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
seers, redundancy with oikist Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 74
social change, and myth Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
social change, memory of maintained in religious practice Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
sophocles Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
sparta Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
stasis, melampodidai and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 74
teiresias Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173
theoclymenus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 173
theoklymenos, genealogy of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 55, 56, 57, 58
theoklymenos, hidden identity of Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 55, 56, 57, 58, 59
theoklymenos, parallels between odysseus and Foster, The Seer and the City: Religion, Politics, and Colonial Ideology in Ancient Greece (2017) 55, 56, 57, 58, 59
tiresias Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
troizen Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
votives, votive offerings, as collective punishment' Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 137
wilamowitz, u. v. Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 174
zeus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170