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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



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Homer, Odyssey, 12.352-12.373
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βοσκέσκονθʼ ἕλικες καλαὶ βόες εὐρυμέτωποι·the fine broad-browed curved-horned cattle were grazing. They stood around them and prayed to the gods, and plucked tender leaves from a tall leafy oak, since they had no white barley on our well-benched ship. Then after they prayed, they slaughtered and skinned them
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μηρούς τʼ ἐξέταμον κατά τε κνίσῃ ἐκάλυψανcut out the thighs and covered them with fat, making a double fold, then laid raw flesh upon them. They didn't have wine to pour upon the blazing victims, so they made libation with water and roasted all the entrails. Then after the thighs were burned up and they'd tasted the entrails
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μίστυλλόν τʼ ἄρα τἆλλα καὶ ἀμφʼ ὀβελοῖσιν ἔπειραν.they cut up the rest, and pierced them with spits on both sides. “Right then sweet sleep sped from my eyelids, and I made my way to my swift ship and sea's shore. But when, on my way, I was near my double-curved ship, right then the sweet aroma of burning fat surrounded me
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οἰμώξας δὲ θεοῖσι μέγʼ ἀθανάτοισι γεγώνευν·and I cried out, wailing, to the gods immortal: 'Father Zeus, and other blessed gods who are forever, with ruthless sleep you very surely lulled me to confusion, while my comrades who stayed contrived a monstrous deed.' “A messenger came quickly to the sun, Hyperion
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.76-1.91, 2.134-2.135, 2.233-2.234, 2.246-2.332, 6.311, 8.551-8.552, 10.321-10.333, 21.441-21.452 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.76. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.77. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.78. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.79. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.80. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.81. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.82. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.83. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.84. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.85. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.86. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.87. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.88. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.89. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.90. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.91. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 2.134. /But allies there be out of many cities, men that wield the spear, who hinder me mightily, and for all that I am fain, suffer me not to sack the well-peopled citadel of Ilios. Already have nine years of great Zeus gone by 2.135. /and lo, our ships' timbers are rotted, and the tackling loosed; and our wives, I ween, and little children sit in our halls awaiting us; yet is our task wholly unaccomplished in furtherance whereof we came hither. Nay, come, even as I shall bid, let us all obey: 2.233. /which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. 2.234. /which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. 2.246. /and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. 2.247. /and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. 2.248. /and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. 2.249. /and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. 2.250. /Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host 2.251. /Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host 2.252. /Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host 2.253. /Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host 2.254. /Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host 2.255. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.256. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.257. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.258. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.259. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.260. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.261. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.262. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.263. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.264. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.265. /So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. 2.266. /So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. 2.267. /So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. 2.268. /So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. 2.269. /So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. 2.270. /But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives 2.271. /But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives 2.272. /But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives 2.273. /But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives 2.274. /But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives 2.275. /seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene 2.276. /seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene 2.277. /seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene 2.278. /seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene 2.279. /seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene 2.280. /in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king 2.281. /in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king 2.282. /in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king 2.283. /in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king 2.284. /in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king 2.285. /the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women 2.286. /the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women 2.287. /the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women 2.288. /the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women 2.289. /the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women 2.290. /do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; 2.291. /do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; 2.292. /do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; 2.293. /do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; 2.294. /do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; 2.295. /but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know 2.296. /but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know 2.297. /but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know 2.298. /but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know 2.299. /but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know 2.300. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.301. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.302. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.303. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.304. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. For this in truth do we know well in our hearts, and ye are all witnesses thereto, even as many as the fates of death have not borne away. It was but as yesterday or the day before, when the ships of the Achaeans were gathering in Aulis, laden with woes for Priam and the Trojans; 2.305. /and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light 2.306. /and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light 2.307. /and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light 2.308. /and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light 2.309. /and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light 2.310. /glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously 2.311. /glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously 2.312. /glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously 2.313. /glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously 2.314. /glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously 2.315. /and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.316. /and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.317. /and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.318. /and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.319. /and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.320. /and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign 2.321. /and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign 2.322. /and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign 2.323. /and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign 2.324. /and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign 2.325. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.326. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.327. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.328. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.329. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.330. /and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans 2.331. /and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans 2.332. /and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans 6.311. /on Troy and the Trojans' wives and their little children. So spake she praying, but Pallas Athene denied the prayer.Thus were these praying to the daughter of great Zeus, but Hector went his way to the palace of Alexander, the fair palace that himself had builded with the men 8.551. /but thereof the blessed gods partook not, neither were minded thereto; for utterly hated of them was sacred Ilios, and Priam, and the people of Priam with goodly spear of ash. 8.552. /but thereof the blessed gods partook not, neither were minded thereto; for utterly hated of them was sacred Ilios, and Priam, and the people of Priam with goodly spear of ash. 10.321. /to go close to the swift-faring ships and spy out all. But come, I pray thee, lift up thy staff and swear to me that verily thou wilt give me the horses and the chariot, richly dight with bronze, even them that bear the peerless son of Peleus. And to thee shall I prove no vain scout, neither one to deceive thy hopes. 10.322. /to go close to the swift-faring ships and spy out all. But come, I pray thee, lift up thy staff and swear to me that verily thou wilt give me the horses and the chariot, richly dight with bronze, even them that bear the peerless son of Peleus. And to thee shall I prove no vain scout, neither one to deceive thy hopes. 10.323. /to go close to the swift-faring ships and spy out all. But come, I pray thee, lift up thy staff and swear to me that verily thou wilt give me the horses and the chariot, richly dight with bronze, even them that bear the peerless son of Peleus. And to thee shall I prove no vain scout, neither one to deceive thy hopes. 10.324. /to go close to the swift-faring ships and spy out all. But come, I pray thee, lift up thy staff and swear to me that verily thou wilt give me the horses and the chariot, richly dight with bronze, even them that bear the peerless son of Peleus. And to thee shall I prove no vain scout, neither one to deceive thy hopes. 10.325. /For I will go straight on to the camp, even until I come to the ship of Agamemnon, where, I ween, the chieftains will be holding council, whether to flee or to fight. So spake he, and Hector took the staff in his hands, and sware to him, saying:Now be my witness Zeus himself, the loud-thundering lord of Hera 10.326. /For I will go straight on to the camp, even until I come to the ship of Agamemnon, where, I ween, the chieftains will be holding council, whether to flee or to fight. So spake he, and Hector took the staff in his hands, and sware to him, saying:Now be my witness Zeus himself, the loud-thundering lord of Hera 10.327. /For I will go straight on to the camp, even until I come to the ship of Agamemnon, where, I ween, the chieftains will be holding council, whether to flee or to fight. So spake he, and Hector took the staff in his hands, and sware to him, saying:Now be my witness Zeus himself, the loud-thundering lord of Hera 10.328. /For I will go straight on to the camp, even until I come to the ship of Agamemnon, where, I ween, the chieftains will be holding council, whether to flee or to fight. So spake he, and Hector took the staff in his hands, and sware to him, saying:Now be my witness Zeus himself, the loud-thundering lord of Hera 10.329. /For I will go straight on to the camp, even until I come to the ship of Agamemnon, where, I ween, the chieftains will be holding council, whether to flee or to fight. So spake he, and Hector took the staff in his hands, and sware to him, saying:Now be my witness Zeus himself, the loud-thundering lord of Hera 10.330. /that on those horses no other man of the Trojans shall mount, but it is thou, I declare, that shalt have glory in them continually. 10.331. /that on those horses no other man of the Trojans shall mount, but it is thou, I declare, that shalt have glory in them continually. 10.332. /that on those horses no other man of the Trojans shall mount, but it is thou, I declare, that shalt have glory in them continually. 10.333. /that on those horses no other man of the Trojans shall mount, but it is thou, I declare, that shalt have glory in them continually. 21.441. /it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.442. /it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.443. /it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.444. /it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.445. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.446. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.447. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.448. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.449. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.450. /But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.451. /But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.452. /But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 1.5-1.9, 1.60-1.62, 1.64-1.79, 2.170-2.172, 3.159-3.160, 4.235-4.289, 5.18-5.20, 5.43-5.261, 7.259-7.260, 8.71-8.72, 9.39-9.61, 9.82-9.104, 9.524-9.536, 9.551-9.555, 10.1-10.76, 10.80-10.574, 11.23-11.50, 11.130-11.132, 12.159, 12.165-12.200, 12.233-12.351, 12.353-12.419, 13.184-13.187, 14.414, 14.418-14.438, 14.443-14.445, 16.377, 18.358, 20.348, 23.277-23.279, 23.306-23.309, 24.215, 24.364 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Euripides, Electra, 1355 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1355. μηδ' ἐπιόρκων μέτα συμπλείτω: 1355. or set sail with perjurers; as a god, I give this address to mortals. Choru
4. Euripides, Medea, 209, 1260 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1260. chase this fell bloody fiend by demons led. Choru
5. Sophocles, Antigone, 1005-1022, 999, 1001 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Sophocles, Electra, 1064-1065, 1063 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Sophocles, Philoctetes, 595, 623, 593 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.3-1.6, 2.291-2.292, 2.294-2.295, 2.314-2.317, 3.645-3.648, 7.585-7.597, 7.600 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.3. to Italy, the blest Lavinian strand. 1.4. Smitten of storms he was on land and sea 1.5. by violence of Heaven, to satisfy 1.6. tern Juno's sleepless wrath; and much in war 2.291. glowed with ensanguined fire; their quivering tongues 2.292. lapped hungrily the hissing, gruesome jaws. 2.294. the monsters to Laocoon made way. 2.295. First round the tender limbs of his two sons 2.314. eized now on every heart. “ of his vast guilt 2.315. Laocoon,” they say, “receives reward; 2.316. for he with most abominable spear 2.317. did strike and violate that blessed wood. 3.645. Then gifts he bade be brought of heavy gold 3.646. and graven ivory, which to our ships 3.647. he bade us bear; each bark was Ioaded full 3.648. with messy silver and Dodona 's pride 7.594. while he but faltered speechless. She upraised
9. Lucan, Pharsalia, 9.227-9.236, 9.290, 9.700-9.899 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Epigraphy, Lsam, 86, 17

11. Epigraphy, Lscg, 152



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
absent oaths, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 64
achaeans Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 29
achaemenides Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
achilles, successors, aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
adventure Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
aeneas, narrator Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
aeneas, reader Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87, 203
aeolus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
agamemnon Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32; Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 64
agathos, agathoi Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
alcinous Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
anachrony Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 327
analepsis, prolepsis Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 327
animals, sacred Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 29
antiphus, and eurypylus Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 327
aphrodite, sacred pigeons (aphrodisias) Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 29
apollo, oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 297
aristocracy, aristocrats, aristocratic Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
arms (arma) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
assembly, homeric Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
athena Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26, 29
basileus, basileis Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
cakes, to nymphs Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 29
calchas Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 64
calypso Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
cameron, alan Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 327
capitoline tablet Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 327
carthage Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
castor (sailors patron) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 297
cato the younger, as anti-odyssean Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 190
chorus, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 297
chryseis Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 64
circe Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42; Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 64
class Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
commoners Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
cos, asclepieum Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 29
cyclops Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
cyrene Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26
death, by drowning Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
death Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
delos, sanctuary of apollo, altar of dionysus Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 29
demeter, oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 297
democracy, ancient and modern, preconditions for Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
demos (damos) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
dicasts oath Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 297
dido Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
diomedes Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 64
discrepancy, between appearance and reality Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
dolon, oath with hector Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 64
egalitarianism Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
emotions, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
emotions, passions Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
emotions Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
ennius, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 19
ennius Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 327
equality Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
erinyes, medea as erinys Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 297
ethical qualities, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
ethical qualities, force, violence Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
ethical qualities, foresight, prudence Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
ethical qualities, intelligence (sapientia, mêtis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
ethical qualities, restraint, self-control, self-restraint Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
ethical qualities, stratagem, strategy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
eurylochus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 64
eurymachus Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
eurypylus, and antiphus Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 327
exōmosiai (oaths of excusal) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 297
hades Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
harder, m. annette Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 327
hector, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 64
hector Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
helios Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 29
helios (sun), island of Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 64
heracles, sanctuary near ilissus (athens) Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 29
hero Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87, 203
hesiod Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
hired labor Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
homecoming Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
homer, homeric Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
homer, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 190
homer Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
horkos (oath) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 297
ideology, middling Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
ideology Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
immortality Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
intentionality Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
island of the sun Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 29
ithaca Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
juno Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
jurors, juries, administration of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
latium Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
law-courts, dicasts oath Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 297
law Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
livius andronicus, model and anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 19
madness Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
malea, cape Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
mass, masses Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
medea, and jasons perjury Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 297
memory Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
mesoi politai (middling citizens) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
metamorphosis Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
mimesis Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
morris, ian Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
myth, and geography Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
naevius, model and anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 19
nai ma oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 297
narrators, aeneid Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
nostos, as master-trope explored by lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 190
nymphs Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 29
oaths to Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 64
oblivion Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
odysseus, and demise of his comrades Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 327
odysseus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87; Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 190; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26, 29; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32; Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 64
odyssey, demise of odysseus comrades Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 327
official oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 297
ogygia Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
opposition Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
panhellenic Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
participation in government Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
pelias punished by medea Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 297
penelope Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 190
phaeacians Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
philochorus Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
pigeons, sacred to aphrodite Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 29
plutarch Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26
poetry, as a remedy against oblivion Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
politeia Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
polyphemus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
poseidon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 29
prolepsis Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 327
rhetoric Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
sacred law of cyrene Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26
samos, heraion Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 29
sanctuaries, water sources Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 29
scheria Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26
scylla and charybdis Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
slavery, slaves Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
storm Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
temporality, anachrony and prolepsis Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 327
theano Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26
themis Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 297
thersites Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
time, synchronism Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
time Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
triad of divine witnesses Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 297
trojan horse, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
trojan war, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
trojan war Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87, 203
trojans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
troy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87, 203; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26
ulysses Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, iliadic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
victim (sacrificial), skin of Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 29
voyaging Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
wandering, odyssean theme Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
wandering Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87, 203
warfare Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
water, sanctuaries and Lupu, Greek Sacred Law: A Collection of New Documents (NGSL) (2005) 29
women Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
words Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
zeus' Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 29
zeus, oaths invoking, lightning bolt of Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 297
zeus, oaths invoking Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 297
zeus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26