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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 12.260-12.402


αὐτὰρ ἐπεὶ πέτρας φύγομεν δεινήν τε Χάρυβδιν“Then after we escaped the rocks, and Scylla, and dread Charybdis, right then we reached the noble island of a god. The fine wide-browed cattleand many fat ship of the sun, Hyperion, were there. Then, while still in my black ship upon the sea
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μυκηθμοῦ τʼ ἤκουσα βοῶν αὐλιζομενάωνI heard the mooing of cattle being driven to the yard and the bleating of sheep, and the words of the blind seer, Teiresias the Theban, and of Circe the Aeaeanfell upon my heart, who very strongly ordered me to avoid the island of the sun who brings delight to mortals.
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δὴ τότʼ ἐγὼν ἑτάροισι μετηύδων ἀχνύμενος κῆρ·Then, my heart grieving, I said to my comrades: 'Comrades, though you're suffering evil, listen to my words, so I can tell you the prophecy of Teiresiasand of Circe the Aeaean, who very strongly ordered me to avoid the island of the sun who brings delight to mortals
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ἔνθα γὰρ αἰνότατον κακὸν ἔμμεναι ἄμμιν ἔφασκεν.for she said there'd be the most grim evil for us there, so, drive our black ship past the island!' “So said I, and their dear heart was broken, and Eurylochus, with hateful words, immediately answered me: 'You're a reckless one, Odysseus, with surpassing strength
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κάμνεις· ἦ ῥά νυ σοί γε σιδήρεα πάντα τέτυκταιand limbs that never tire. Indeed, you're completely made of iron, you who won't allow your comrades, overloaded with sleep and exhaustion, to make our way to land, there, back on a sea-girt island, where we could make a tasty supper. You order us instead to wander through the swift night as we are
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νήσου ἀποπλαγχθέντας ἐν ἠεροειδέι πόντῳ.driven away from an island, on the misty sea. Hard winds, ship wreckers, arise at night. How can anyone escape sheer destruction should a wind's storm somehow come suddenly, of South Wind or of stormy West Wind, who most often
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νῆα διαρραίουσι θεῶν ἀέκητι ἀνάκτων.hatter ships despite the lord gods' will? So, yes, let's yield now to black night, stay by our swift ship, and make ourselves supper, then go on board at dawn and sail upon the wide sea.' “So said Eurylochus, and the rest of my comrades assented.
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καὶ τότε δὴ γίγνωσκον ὃ δὴ κακὰ μήδετο δαίμωνRight then I knew that a divinity intended evil, and, voicing winged words, I said to him: 'Eurylochus, you can surely force me, one man as I am, but come, all of you, and swear a mighty oath to me, that if we find some herd of cattle or great flock of sheep
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εὕρωμεν, μή πού τις ἀτασθαλίῃσι κακῇσινno one nohow with evil recklessness will kill an ox or any sheep, but at your ease you'll eat the food immortal Circe gave us.' “So said I, and they at once swore they wouldn't, as I bid them. Then after they'd sworn and completed the oath
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στήσαμεν ἐν λιμένι γλαφυρῷ ἐυεργέα νῆαwe moored our well-built ship in a hollow harbor, near sweet water, and my comrades disembarked from the ship, then skillfully made supper. Then after they'd dispatched desire for food and drink, they remembered and wept for their beloved comrade
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οὓς ἔφαγε Σκύλλη γλαφυρῆς ἐκ νηὸς ἑλοῦσα·whom Scylla had snatched from the hollow ship and eaten, and sweet sleep came upon them as they wept. Then when it was the third part of the night, and the stars had headed down, Cloud-gatherer Zeus raised a blustery wind with a marvelous furious storm, and hid with cloud
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γαῖαν ὁμοῦ καὶ πόντον· ὀρώρει δʼ οὐρανόθεν νύξ.both land and sea, as night rushed from heaven. When early-born rose-fingered Dawn appeared, we brought our ship to safety dragging her into a hollow cave where there were nymphs' seats and dancing places. Right then I held an assembly and said among them all:
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ὦ φίλοι, ἐν γὰρ νηὶ θοῇ βρῶσίς τε πόσις τε'Friends, since there's food and drink on our swift ship, let's keep our hands off the cattle, lest we in some way suffer, for these are the cattle and plump sheep of a dread god, of Helios, who sees all and hears all.' “So said I, and their manly hearts were persuaded.
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μῆνα δὲ πάντʼ ἄλληκτος ἄη Νότος, οὐδέ τις ἄλλοςThen a whole month South Wind blew incessantly, nor did any other of the winds arise then, except for South and East. As long as they had food and red wine, they kept away from the cattle, eager for life, but when all the ship's provisions were consumed
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καὶ δὴ ἄγρην ἐφέπεσκον ἀλητεύοντες ἀνάγκῃand by necessity they went roaming in pursuit of game, fish and fowl, whatever might reach their dear hands, with curved fishhooks, and hunger afflicted their bellies, right then I went away, up through the island, so I could pray to the gods in hope that one would show me the way to go.
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ἀλλʼ ὅτε δὴ διὰ νήσου ἰὼν ἤλυξα ἑταίρουςBut when going through the island I got free of my comrades, I washed my hands where there was shelter from the wind and prayed to all the gods who hold Olympus, who then poured sweet sleep upon my eyelids. Then Eurylochus broached an evil plan to our comrades:
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κέκλυτέ μευ μύθων κακά περ πάσχοντες ἑταῖροι.'Comrades, though you're suffering evil, listen to my words! All deaths are loathesome to wretched mortals, but the most pitiful is to die and meet one's doom from hunger. So come, let's drive off the best of the cattle of the sun and sacrifice to the immortals who hold wide heaven.
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εἰ δέ κεν εἰς Ἰθάκην ἀφικοίμεθα, πατρίδα γαῖανIf we ever get to Ithaca, our fatherland, we'll immediately build a rich temple to the sun, Hyperion, and place in it offerings good and many. But if he becomes angry in some way about his straight-horned cattleand wants to destroy our ship, and the other gods follow along
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βούλομʼ ἅπαξ πρὸς κῦμα χανὼν ἀπὸ θυμὸν ὀλέσσαιI'd rather lose my life all at once gulping at a wave than be drained for a long time, as I am, on a desolate island.' “So said Eurylochus, and the rest of my comrades assented. They at once drove off the best of the cattle of the sun from nearby, for not far from our dark-prowed ship
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βοσκέσκονθʼ ἕλικες καλαὶ βόες εὐρυμέτωποι·the fine broad-browed curved-horned cattle were grazing. They stood around them and prayed to the gods, and plucked tender leaves from a tall leafy oak, since they had no white barley on our well-benched ship. Then after they prayed, they slaughtered and skinned them
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μηρούς τʼ ἐξέταμον κατά τε κνίσῃ ἐκάλυψανcut out the thighs and covered them with fat, making a double fold, then laid raw flesh upon them. They didn't have wine to pour upon the blazing victims, so they made libation with water and roasted all the entrails. Then after the thighs were burned up and they'd tasted the entrails
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μίστυλλόν τʼ ἄρα τἆλλα καὶ ἀμφʼ ὀβελοῖσιν ἔπειραν.they cut up the rest, and pierced them with spits on both sides. “Right then sweet sleep sped from my eyelids, and I made my way to my swift ship and sea's shore. But when, on my way, I was near my double-curved ship, right then the sweet aroma of burning fat surrounded me
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οἰμώξας δὲ θεοῖσι μέγʼ ἀθανάτοισι γεγώνευν·and I cried out, wailing, to the gods immortal: 'Father Zeus, and other blessed gods who are forever, with ruthless sleep you very surely lulled me to confusion, while my comrades who stayed contrived a monstrous deed.' “A messenger came quickly to the sun, Hyperion
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Λαμπετίη τανύπεπλος, ὅ οἱ βόας ἔκταμεν ἡμεῖς.long-robed Lampetia, who told him that we'd killed his cattle. Enraged at heart, he said at once to the immortals: 'Father Zeus, and other blessed gods who are forever, make the comrades of Laertiades Odysseus pay a price, who killed my cattle wantonly, the cattle in whom
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χαίρεσκον μὲν ἰὼν εἰς οὐρανὸν ἀστερόενταI delighted, when I went to starry heaven and when I'd turn back again from heaven to the earth. Unless they pay me fitting compensation for my cattle, I'll go down to the house of Hades and shine among the dead!' “Cloud-gatherer Zeus said to him in reply:
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Ἠέλιʼ, ἦ τοι μὲν σὺ μετʼ ἀθανάτοισι φάεινε'Yes, Helios, keep shining among immortals and mortal men upon grain-giving farmland, and I'll strike their ship soon with white lightning and shatter it into small pieces in the midst of the wine-dark sea.' “I heard this from fair-haired Calypso
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ἡ δʼ ἔφη Ἑρμείαο διακτόρου αὐτὴ ἀκοῦσαι.who said she heard it herself from runner Hermes. “Then after I came down to the ship and sea, I went up to and reproached one and another, but we could find no remedy. The cattled had already died. Then the gods soon showed them portents.
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εἷρπον μὲν ῥινοί, κρέα δʼ ἀμφʼ ὀβελοῖσι μεμύκειHides crawled, flesh, roasted and raw, mooed on the spits, and the sound was as of cattle. “For six days afterward my trusty comrades dined on the best of the cattle of the sun they'd driven off. But when Zeus Cronion added the seventh day
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καὶ τότʼ ἔπειτʼ ἄνεμος μὲν ἐπαύσατο λαίλαπι θύωνand right then the wind stopped rushing in a storm, we got aboard at once and sent her into the wide sea, setting up the mast and hoisting the white sail. “But when we'd left the island, and no other land appeared, only sea and sky
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.134-2.135, 2.233-2.234, 2.246-2.332, 6.311, 8.551-8.552, 21.441-21.452 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.134. /But allies there be out of many cities, men that wield the spear, who hinder me mightily, and for all that I am fain, suffer me not to sack the well-peopled citadel of Ilios. Already have nine years of great Zeus gone by 2.135. /and lo, our ships' timbers are rotted, and the tackling loosed; and our wives, I ween, and little children sit in our halls awaiting us; yet is our task wholly unaccomplished in furtherance whereof we came hither. Nay, come, even as I shall bid, let us all obey: 2.233. /which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. 2.234. /which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. 2.246. /and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. 2.247. /and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. 2.248. /and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. 2.249. /and with an angry glance from beneath his brows, chid him with harsh words, saying:Thersites of reckless speech, clear-voiced talker though thou art, refrain thee, and be not minded to strive singly against kings. For I deem that there is no viler mortal than thou amongst all those that with the sons of Atreus came beneath Ilios. 2.250. /Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host 2.251. /Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host 2.252. /Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host 2.253. /Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host 2.254. /Wherefore 'twere well thou shouldst not take the name of kings in thy mouth as thou protest, to cast reproaches upon them, and to watch for home-going. In no wise do we know clearly as yet how these things are to be, whether it be for good or ill that we sons of the Achaeans shall return. Therefore dost thou now continually utter revilings against Atreus' son, Agamemnon, shepherd of the host 2.255. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.256. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.257. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.258. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.259. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.260. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.261. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.262. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.263. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.264. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.265. /So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. 2.266. /So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. 2.267. /So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. 2.268. /So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. 2.269. /So spake Odysseus, and with his staff smote his back and shoulders; and Thersites cowered down, and a big tear fell from him, and a bloody weal rose up on his back beneath the staff of gold. Then he sate him down, and fear came upon him, and stung by pain with helpless looks he wiped away the tear. 2.270. /But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives 2.271. /But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives 2.272. /But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives 2.273. /But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives 2.274. /But the Achaeans, sore vexed at heart though they were, broke into a merry laugh at him, and thus would one speak with a glance at his neighbour:Out upon it! verily hath Odysseus ere now wrought good deeds without number as leader in good counsel and setting battle in army, but now is this deed far the best that he hath wrought among the Argives 2.275. /seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene 2.276. /seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene 2.277. /seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene 2.278. /seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene 2.279. /seeing he hath made this scurrilous babbler to cease from his prating. Never again, I ween, will his proud spirit henceforth set him on to rail at kings with words of reviling. So spake the multitude; but up rose Odysseus, sacker of cities, the sceptre in his hand, and by his side flashing-eyed Athene 2.280. /in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king 2.281. /in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king 2.282. /in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king 2.283. /in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king 2.284. /in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king 2.285. /the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women 2.286. /the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women 2.287. /the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women 2.288. /the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women 2.289. /the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women 2.290. /do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; 2.291. /do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; 2.292. /do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; 2.293. /do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; 2.294. /do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; 2.295. /but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know 2.296. /but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know 2.297. /but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know 2.298. /but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know 2.299. /but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know 2.300. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.301. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.302. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.303. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.304. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. For this in truth do we know well in our hearts, and ye are all witnesses thereto, even as many as the fates of death have not borne away. It was but as yesterday or the day before, when the ships of the Achaeans were gathering in Aulis, laden with woes for Priam and the Trojans; 2.305. /and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light 2.306. /and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light 2.307. /and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light 2.308. /and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light 2.309. /and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light 2.310. /glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously 2.311. /glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously 2.312. /glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously 2.313. /glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously 2.314. /glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously 2.315. /and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.316. /and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.317. /and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.318. /and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.319. /and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.320. /and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign 2.321. /and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign 2.322. /and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign 2.323. /and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign 2.324. /and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign 2.325. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.326. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.327. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.328. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.329. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.330. /and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans 2.331. /and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans 2.332. /and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans 6.311. /on Troy and the Trojans' wives and their little children. So spake she praying, but Pallas Athene denied the prayer.Thus were these praying to the daughter of great Zeus, but Hector went his way to the palace of Alexander, the fair palace that himself had builded with the men 8.551. /but thereof the blessed gods partook not, neither were minded thereto; for utterly hated of them was sacred Ilios, and Priam, and the people of Priam with goodly spear of ash. 8.552. /but thereof the blessed gods partook not, neither were minded thereto; for utterly hated of them was sacred Ilios, and Priam, and the people of Priam with goodly spear of ash. 21.441. /it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.442. /it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.443. /it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.444. /it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.445. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.446. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.447. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.448. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.449. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.450. /But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.451. /But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.452. /But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 1.5-1.9, 1.60-1.62, 1.64-1.79, 2.170-2.172, 3.159-3.160, 4.235-4.289, 5.18-5.20, 5.43-5.261, 7.259-7.260, 8.71-8.72, 9.39-9.61, 9.82-9.104, 9.524-9.536, 9.551-9.555, 10.1-10.76, 10.80-10.574, 11.23-11.50, 11.130-11.132, 12.159, 12.165-12.200, 12.233-12.259, 12.261-12.419, 13.184-13.187, 14.414, 14.418-14.438, 14.443-14.445, 16.377, 18.358, 20.348, 23.277-23.279, 24.215, 24.364 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Sophocles, Antigone, 1005-1022, 999, 1001 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 4.1232-4.1249 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

5. Strabo, Geography, 1.2.36, 2.4.1, 3.5.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.2.36. Homer has described to us the phenomena of the ocean under the form of a myth; this [art] is very desirable in a poet; the idea of his Charybdis was taken from the ebb and flow of the tide, and was by no means a pure invention of his own, but derived from what he knew concerning the Strait of Sicily. And although he states that the ebb and flow occurred thrice during the four and twenty hours, instead of twice, (Each day she thrice disgorges, and each day Thrice swallows it) we must suppose that he said this not through any ignorance of the fact, but for tragic effect, and to excite the fear which Circe endeavours to infuse into her arguments to deter Ulysses from departing, even at a little expense of truth. The following is the language Circe makes use of in her speech to him: Each day she thrice disgorges, and each day Thrice swallows it. Ah! well-forewarn'd beware What time she swallows, that thou come not nigh, For not himself, Neptune, could snatch thee thence. [Od. xii. 105.] And yet when Ulysses was ingulfed in the eddy he was not lost. He tells us himself, 'It was the time when she absorb'd profound The briny flood, but by a wave upborne, I seized the branches fast of the wild fig, To which bat-like I clung. And then having waited for the timbers of the wreck he seized hold of them, and thus saved himself. Circe, therefore, had exaggerated both the peril, and also the fact of its vomiting forth thrice a day instead of twice. However, this latter is a hyperbole which every one makes use of; thus we say thricehappy and thrice-miserable. So the poet, Thrice-happy Greeks! [Od. v. 306.] Again, O delightful, thrice-wished for! Iliad viii. 488. And again, O thrice and four times. Iliad iii. 363. Any one, too, might conclude from the passage itself that Homer even here hinted at the truth, for the long time which the remains of the wreck lay under water, which Ulysses, who was all the while hanging suspended to the branches, so anxiously desired to rise, accords much better with the ebb and flow taking place but twice during the night and day instead of thrice. Therefore hard I clench'd the boughs, till she disgorged again Both keel and mast. Not undesired by me They came, though late; for at what hour the judge, After decision made of numerous strifes Between young candidates for honour, leaves The forum, for refreshment's sake at home, Then was it that the mast and keel emerged. [Od. xii. 437.] Every word of this indicates a considerable length of time, especially when he prolongs it to the evening, not merely saying at that time when the judge has risen, but having adjudicated on a vast number of cases, and therefore detained longer than usual. Otherwise his account of the return of the wreck would not have appeared likely, if he had brought it back again with the return of the wave, before it had been first carried a long way off. 2.4.1. POLYBIUS, in his Chorography of Europe, tells us that it is not his intention to examine the writings of the ancient geographers, but the statements of those who have criticised them, such as Dicaearchus, Eratosthenes, (who was the last of those who [in his time] had laboured on geography,) and Pytheas, by whom many have been deceived. It is this last writer who states that he travelled all over Britain on foot, and that the island is above 40,000 stadia in circumference. It is likewise he who describes Thule and other neighbouring places, where, according to him, neither earth, water, nor air exist, separately, but a sort of concretion of all these, resembling marine sponge, in which the earth, the sea, and all things were suspended, thus forming, as it were, a link to unite the whole together. It can neither be travelled over nor sailed through. As for the substance, he affirms that he has beheld it with his own eyes; the rest, he reports on the authority of others. So much for the statements of Pytheas, who tells us, besides, that after he had returned thence, he traversed the whole coasts of Europe from Gades to the Tanais. 3.5.7. Polybius relates that there is a spring within the sanctuary of Hercules at Gades, having a descent of a few steps to fresh water, which is affected in a manner the reverse of the sea tides, subsiding at the flow of the tide, and springing at the ebb. He assigns as the cause of this phenomenon, that air rises from the interior to the surface of the earth; when this surface is covered by the waves, at the rising of the sea, the air is deprived of its ordinary vents, and returns to the interior, stopping up the passages of the spring, and causing a want of water, but when the surface is again laid bare, the air having a direct exit liberates the channels which feed the spring, so that it gushes freely. Artemidorus rejects this explanation, and substitutes one of his own, recording at the same time the opinion of the historian Silanus; but neither one or other of their views seems to me worth relating, since both he and Silanus were ignorant in regard to these matters. Posidonius asserts that the entire account is false, and adds that there are two wells in the sanctuary of Hercules, and a third in the city. That the smaller of the two in the sanctuary of Hercules, if drawn from frequently, will become for a time exhausted, but that on ceasing to draw from it, it fills again: while in regard to the larger, it may be drawn from during the whole day; that it is true it becomes lower, like all other wells, but that it fills again during the night when drawing ceases. [He adds] that the ebb tide frequently happening to occur during the period of its re-filling, gave rise to the groundless belief of the inhabitants as to its being affected in an opposite manner [to the tides of the ocean]. However it is not only related by him that it is a commonly believed fact, but we have received it from tradition as much referred to amongst paradoxes. We have likewise heard that there are wells both within the city and also in the gardens without, but that on account of the inferiority of this water, tanks are generally constructed throughout the city for the supply of water: whether likewise any of these reservoirs give any signs of being affected in an opposite manner to the tides, we know not. If such be the case, the causes thereof should be received as amongst phenomena hard to be explained. It is likely that Polybius may have assigned the proper reason; but it is also likely that certain of the channels of the springs being damped outside become relaxed, and so let the water run out into the surrounding land, instead of forcing it along its ancient passage to the spring; and there will of course be moisture when the tide overflows. But if, as Athenodorus asserts, the ebb and flow resemble the inspiration and expiration of the breath, it is possible that some of the currents of water which naturally have an efflux on to the surface of the earth, through various channels, the mouths of which we denominate springs and fountains, are by other channels drawn towards the depths of the sea, and raise it, so as to produce a flood-tide; when the expiration is sufficient, they leave off the course in which they are then flowing, and again revert to their former direction, when that again takes a change.
6. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.3-1.6, 2.291-2.292, 2.294-2.295, 2.314-2.317, 3.645-3.648 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.3. to Italy, the blest Lavinian strand. 1.4. Smitten of storms he was on land and sea 1.5. by violence of Heaven, to satisfy 1.6. tern Juno's sleepless wrath; and much in war 2.291. glowed with ensanguined fire; their quivering tongues 2.292. lapped hungrily the hissing, gruesome jaws. 2.294. the monsters to Laocoon made way. 2.295. First round the tender limbs of his two sons 2.314. eized now on every heart. “ of his vast guilt 2.315. Laocoon,” they say, “receives reward; 2.316. for he with most abominable spear 2.317. did strike and violate that blessed wood. 3.645. Then gifts he bade be brought of heavy gold 3.646. and graven ivory, which to our ships 3.647. he bade us bear; each bark was Ioaded full 3.648. with messy silver and Dodona 's pride
7. Lucan, Pharsalia, 9.700-9.899 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achaemenides Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
achilles, successors, aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
adventure Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
aegean sea, currents in Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
aeneas, narrator Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
aeneas, reader Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
aeneas Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87, 203
aeolus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
agamemnon Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
agathos, agathoi Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
alcinous Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
aristocracy, aristocrats, aristocratic Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
arms (arma) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
assembly, homeric Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
athena Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26
baetis river Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
basileus, basileis Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
black sea, currents of Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
calypso Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
carthage Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
cato the younger, as anti-odyssean Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 190
charybdis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
circe Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
class Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
commoners Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
cyclops Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
cyrene Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26
death, by drowning Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
death Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
democracy, ancient and modern, preconditions for Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
demos (damos) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
dido Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
dionysius ii of syracuse Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
discrepancy, between appearance and reality Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
earth Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
egalitarianism Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
emotions, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
emotions, passions Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
emotions Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
equality Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
ethical qualities, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
ethical qualities, force, violence Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
ethical qualities, foresight, prudence Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
ethical qualities, intelligence (sapientia, mêtis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
ethical qualities, restraint, self-control, self-restraint Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
ethical qualities, stratagem, strategy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
euboean strait Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
euripus Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
eurymachus Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
gades (gadir, gadeira), posidonius and Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
gallic ocean Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
hades Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
hector Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
helios Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
helios (divinity) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
hero Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87, 203
hesiod Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
hired labor Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
hispalis (hispal) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
homecoming Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
homer, homeric Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
homer, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 190
homer Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
ideology, middling Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
ideology Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
immortality Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
intentionality Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
italy (italia) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
ithaca Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
juno Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
jurors, juries, administration of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
latium Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
law Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
madness Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
malea, cape Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
mass, masses Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
memory Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
mesoi politai (middling citizens) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
messana Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
metamorphosis Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
mimesis Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
moon Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
morris, ian Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
mylae Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
myth, and geography Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
narrators, aeneid Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
nostos, as master-trope explored by lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 190
oblivion Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
odysseus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87; Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 190; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32; Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
ogygia Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
opposition Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
oxen Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
panhellenic Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
participation in government Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
penelope Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 190
phaeacians Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
philochorus Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
plutarch Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26
poetry, as a remedy against oblivion Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
politeia Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
polyphemus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
poseidon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
rhetoric Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
sacred law of cyrene Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26
scheria Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26
scylla Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
scylla and charybdis Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
slavery, slaves Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
storm Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
theano Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26
thersites Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
tides Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
time, synchronism Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
time Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
trojan horse, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
trojan war, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 42
trojan war Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87, 203
trojans Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
troy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87, 203; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26
ulysses Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, iliadic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
voyaging Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
wandering, odyssean theme Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
wandering Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 87, 203
warfare Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
women Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 32
words Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 203
xenophanes of colophon Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 94
zeus' Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 26