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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 11.582
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

21 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 102, 122-142, 153-155, 166-171, 101 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

101. Men age. Pandora took out of the jar
2. Hesiod, Catalogue of Women, 30 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Homer, Iliad, 3.278-3.279, 6.145-6.146, 8.13-8.17, 8.369, 8.481, 11.488, 12.322-12.323, 18.115-18.119, 19.259-19.260, 21.106-21.107, 21.462-21.465, 23.71, 23.75-23.76, 24.525-24.528 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3.278. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 3.279. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 6.145. / Great-souled son of Tydeus, wherefore inquirest thou of my lineage? Even as are the generations of leaves, such are those also of men. As for the leaves, the wind scattereth some upon the earth, but the forest, as it bourgeons, putteth forth others when the season of spring is come; even so of men one generation springeth up and another passeth away. 6.146. / Great-souled son of Tydeus, wherefore inquirest thou of my lineage? Even as are the generations of leaves, such are those also of men. As for the leaves, the wind scattereth some upon the earth, but the forest, as it bourgeons, putteth forth others when the season of spring is come; even so of men one generation springeth up and another passeth away. 8.13. /Whomsoever I shall mark minded apart from the gods to go and bear aid either to Trojans or Danaans, smitten in no seemly wise shall he come back to Olympus, or I shall take and hurl him into murky Tartarus 8.14. /Whomsoever I shall mark minded apart from the gods to go and bear aid either to Trojans or Danaans, smitten in no seemly wise shall he come back to Olympus, or I shall take and hurl him into murky Tartarus 8.15. /far, far away, where is the deepest gulf beneath the earth, the gates whereof are of iron and the threshold of bronze, as far beneath Hades as heaven is above earth: then shall ye know how far the mightiest am I of all gods. Nay, come, make trial, ye gods, that ye all may know. Make ye fast from heaven a chain of gold 8.16. /far, far away, where is the deepest gulf beneath the earth, the gates whereof are of iron and the threshold of bronze, as far beneath Hades as heaven is above earth: then shall ye know how far the mightiest am I of all gods. Nay, come, make trial, ye gods, that ye all may know. Make ye fast from heaven a chain of gold 8.17. /far, far away, where is the deepest gulf beneath the earth, the gates whereof are of iron and the threshold of bronze, as far beneath Hades as heaven is above earth: then shall ye know how far the mightiest am I of all gods. Nay, come, make trial, ye gods, that ye all may know. Make ye fast from heaven a chain of gold 8.369. /send me forth to succour him. Had I but known all this in wisdom of my heart when Eurystheus sent him forth to the house of Hades the Warder, to bring from out of Erebus the hound of loathed Hades, then had he not escaped the sheer-falling waters of Styx. 8.481. /and have joy neither in the rays of Helios Hyperion nor in any breeze, but deep Tartarus is round about them. Though thou shouldst fare even thither in thy wanderings, yet reck I not of thy wrath, seeing there is naught more shameless than thou. So said he; howbeit white-armed Hera spake no word in answer. 11.488. /Then Aias drew near, bearing his shield that was like a city wall, and stood forth beside him, and the Trojans scattered in flight, one here, one there. And warlike Menelaus led Odysseus forth from the throng, holding him by the hand, till his squire drave up the horses and car. 12.322. /and drink choice wine, honey-sweet: nay, but their might too is goodly, seeing they fight amid the foremost Lycians. Ah friend, if once escaped from this battle we were for ever to be ageless and immortal, neither should I fight myself amid the foremost 12.323. /and drink choice wine, honey-sweet: nay, but their might too is goodly, seeing they fight amid the foremost Lycians. Ah friend, if once escaped from this battle we were for ever to be ageless and immortal, neither should I fight myself amid the foremost 18.115. /even on Hector; for my fate, I will accept it whenso Zeus willeth to bring it to pass, and the other immortal gods. For not even the mighty Heracles escaped death, albeit he was most dear to Zeus, son of Cronos, the king, but fate overcame him, and the dread wrath of Hera. 18.116. /even on Hector; for my fate, I will accept it whenso Zeus willeth to bring it to pass, and the other immortal gods. For not even the mighty Heracles escaped death, albeit he was most dear to Zeus, son of Cronos, the king, but fate overcame him, and the dread wrath of Hera. 18.117. /even on Hector; for my fate, I will accept it whenso Zeus willeth to bring it to pass, and the other immortal gods. For not even the mighty Heracles escaped death, albeit he was most dear to Zeus, son of Cronos, the king, but fate overcame him, and the dread wrath of Hera. 18.118. /even on Hector; for my fate, I will accept it whenso Zeus willeth to bring it to pass, and the other immortal gods. For not even the mighty Heracles escaped death, albeit he was most dear to Zeus, son of Cronos, the king, but fate overcame him, and the dread wrath of Hera. 18.119. /even on Hector; for my fate, I will accept it whenso Zeus willeth to bring it to pass, and the other immortal gods. For not even the mighty Heracles escaped death, albeit he was most dear to Zeus, son of Cronos, the king, but fate overcame him, and the dread wrath of Hera. 19.259. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.260. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 21.106. /aye, not one among all the Trojans, and least of all among the sons of Priam. Nay, friend, do thou too die; why lamentest thou thus? Patroclus also died, who was better far than thou. And seest thou not what manner of man am I, how comely and how tall? A good man was my father, and a goddess the mother that bare me; yet over me too hang death and mighty fate. 21.107. /aye, not one among all the Trojans, and least of all among the sons of Priam. Nay, friend, do thou too die; why lamentest thou thus? Patroclus also died, who was better far than thou. And seest thou not what manner of man am I, how comely and how tall? A good man was my father, and a goddess the mother that bare me; yet over me too hang death and mighty fate. 21.462. /in utter ruin with their children and their honoured wives. Then spake unto him lord Apollo, that worketh afar:Shaker of Earth, as nowise sound of mind wouldest thou count me, if I should war with thee for the sake of mortals, pitiful creatures, that like unto leaves 21.463. /in utter ruin with their children and their honoured wives. Then spake unto him lord Apollo, that worketh afar:Shaker of Earth, as nowise sound of mind wouldest thou count me, if I should war with thee for the sake of mortals, pitiful creatures, that like unto leaves 21.464. /in utter ruin with their children and their honoured wives. Then spake unto him lord Apollo, that worketh afar:Shaker of Earth, as nowise sound of mind wouldest thou count me, if I should war with thee for the sake of mortals, pitiful creatures, that like unto leaves 21.465. /are now full of flaming life, eating the fruit of the field, and now again pine away and perish. Nay, with speed let us cease from strife, and let them do battle by themselves. 23.71. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.75. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.76. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 24.525. /For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot 24.526. /For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot 24.527. /For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot 24.528. /For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot
4. Homer, Odyssey, 4.561-4.569, 10.513-10.514, 11.37-11.41, 11.66-11.80, 11.82-11.83, 11.227-11.230, 11.300-11.301, 11.488-11.491, 11.543, 11.561, 11.563-11.581, 11.583-11.627, 18.130-18.131 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 274, 273 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

273. μέγας γὰρ Ἅιδης ἐστὶν εὔθυνος βροτῶν
6. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 231, 230 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

230. κἀκεῖ δικάζει τἀπλακήμαθʼ, ὡς λόγος 230. There also among the dead, so men tell, another Zeus holds a last judgment upon misdeeds. Take heed and reply in this manner, that victory may attend your cause. Enter the King of Argos with men-at-arms King
7. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 4.46-4.47 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 1.54-1.71 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Theognis, Elegies, 426, 425 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Plato, Cratylus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

12. Xenophon, Memoirs, 2.1.24, 2.1.30 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.1.24. First, of wars and worries you shall not think, but shall ever be considering what choice food or drink you can find, what sight or sound will delight you, what touch or perfume; what tender love can give you most joy, what bed the softest slumbers; and how to come by all these pleasures with least trouble. 2.1.30. What good thing is thine, poor wretch, or what pleasant thing dost thou know, if thou wilt do nought to win them? Thou dost not even tarry for the desire of pleasant things, but fillest thyself with all things before thou desirest them, eating before thou art hungry, drinking before thou art thirsty, getting thee cooks, to give zest to eating, buying thee costly wines and running to and fro in search of snow in summer, to give zest to drinking; to soothe thy slumbers it is not enough for thee to buy soft coverlets, but thou must have frames for thy beds. For not toil, but the tedium of having nothing to do, makes thee long for sleep. Thou dost rouse lust by many a trick, when there is no need, using men as women: thus thou trainest thy friends, waxing wanton by night, consuming in sleep the best hours of day.
13. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 15.293-15.294 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Strabo, Geography, 1.3.17, 8.7.2, 9.2.18 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.7.2. For the sea was raised by an earthquake and it submerged Helice, and also the sanctuary of the Heliconian Poseidon, whom the Ionians worship even to this day, offering there the Pan-Ionian sacrifices. And, as some suppose, Homer recalls this sacrifice when he says: but he breathed out his spirit and bellowed, as when a dragged bull bellows round the altar of the Heliconian lord. And they infer that the poet lived after the Ionian colonization, since he mentions the Pan-Ionian sacrifice, which the Ionians perform in honor of the Heliconian Poseidon in the country of the Prienians; for the Prienians themselves are also said to be from Helice; and indeed as king for this sacrifice they appoint a Prienian young man to superintend the sacred rites. But still more they base the supposition in question on what the poet says about the bull; for the Ionians believe that they obtain omens in connection with this sacrifice only when the bull bellows while being sacrificed. But the opponents of the supposition apply the above-mentioned inferences concerning the bull and the sacrifice to Helice, on the ground that these were customary there and that the poet was merely comparing the rites that were celebrated there. Helice was submerged by the sea two years before the battle at Leuctra. And Eratosthenes says that he himself saw the place, and that the ferrymen say that there was a bronze Poseidon in the strait, standing erect, holding a hippo-campus in his hand, which was perilous for those who fished with nets. And Heracleides says that the submersion took place by night in his time, and, although the city was twelve stadia distant from the sea, this whole district together with the city was hidden from sight; and two thousand men who had been sent by the Achaeans were unable to recover the dead bodies; and they divided the territory of Helice among the neighbors; and the submersion was the result of the anger of Poseidon, for the Ionians who had been driven out of Helice sent men to ask the inhabitants of Helice particularly for the statue of Poseidon, or, if not that, for a likeness of the sacred object; and when the inhabitants refused to give either, the Ionians sent word to the general council of the Achaeans; but although the assembly voted favorably, yet even so the inhabitants of Helice refused to obey; and the submersion resulted the following winter; but the Achaeans later gave the likeness to the Ionians. Hesiod mentions still another Helice, in Thessaly. 9.2.18. This is best shown by the Cephissus, which fills lake Copais; for when the lake had increased so much that Copae was in danger of being swallowed up (Copae is named by the poet, and from it the lake took its name), a rent in the earth, which was formed by the lake near Copae, opened up a subterranean channel about thirty stadia in length and admitted the river; and then the river burst forth to the surface near Larymna in Locris; I mean the Upper Larymna, for there is another Larymna, which I have already mentioned, the Boeotian Larymna on the sea, to which the Romans annexed the Upper Larymna. The place is called Anchoe; and there is also a lake of the same name. And when it leaves this lake the Cephissus at last flows out to the sea. Now at that time, when the flooding of the lake ceased, there was also a cessation of danger to those who lived near it, except in the case of the cities which had already been swallowed up. And though the subterranean channels filled up again, Crates the mining engineer of Chalcis ceased clearing away the obstructions because of party strife among the Boeotians, although, as he himself says in the letter to Alexander, many places had already been drained. Among these places, some writers suppose, was the ancient site of Orchomenus, and others, those of Eleusis and Athens on the Triton River. These cities, it is said, were founded by Cecrops, when he ruled over Boeotia, then called Ogygia, but were later wiped out by inundations. And it is said that a fissure in the earth opened up near Orchomenus, also, and that it admitted the Melas River, which flowed through the territory of Haliartus and formed there the marsh which produces the reed that is used for flutes. But this river has completely disappeared, either because it is dispersed by the fissure into invisible channels or because it is used up beforehand by the marshes and lakes in the neighborhood of Haliartus, from which the poet calls the place grassy, when he says, and grassy Haliartus.
15. Vergil, Georgics, 4.484 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.484. With napkins of shorn pile, while others heap
16. Suetonius, Titus, 4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 7.25.9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.25.9. The only Burians to survive were those who chanced to be absent at the time, either on active service or for some other reason, and these became the second founders of Bura. There is a temple here of Demeter, one of Aphrodite and Dionysus, and a third of Eileithyia. The images are of Pentelic marble, and were made by Eucleides of Athens . There is drapery for Demeter. This means either that the other images were undraped or that for Demeter raiment was kept in the temple for solemn occasions. Isis too has a sanctuary.
18. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 3.25, 3.32 (2nd cent. CE

3.25. ThereUPON the Indian smiled and said: You seem to think that mere abstention from injustice constitutes justice, and I am of opinion that all Greeks do the same. For as I once learned from the Egyptians that come hither, governors from Rome are in the habit of visiting your country, brandishing their axes naked over your heads, before they know they have bad men to rule or not; but you acknowledge them to be just if they merely do not sell justice. And I have heard that the slave merchants yonder do exactly the same; for when they come to you with convoys of Carian slaves and are anxious to recommend their characters to you, they make it a great merit of the slaves that they do not steal. In the same way do you recommend on such grounds the rulers whose sway you acknowledge, and after decorating them with such praises as you lavish upon slaves, you send them away, objects, as you imagine, of universal admiration. Nay more, your cleverest poets will not give you leave to be just and good, even if you want to. For here was Minos, a man who exceeded all men in cruelty, and who enslaved with his navies the inhabitants of continent and islands alike, and yet they honor him by placing in his hand a scepter of justice and give him a throne in Hades to be umpire of spirits; while at the same time they deny food and drink to Tantalus, merely because he was a good man and inclined to share with his friends the immortality bestowed upon them by the Gods. And some of them hang stones over him, and rain insults of a terrible kind upon this divine and good man; and I would much rather that they had represented him as swimming in a lake of nectar, for he regaled men with that drink humanely and ungrudgingly. And as he spoke he pointed out a statue which stood upon his left hand, on which was inscribed the name Tantalus. Now this statue was four cubits high, and represented a man of fifty years who was clad in the fashion of Argolis, though he differed in his cloak, that being like a Thessalian's, and he held a cup sufficient at least for one thirsty man and drank your health therefrom, and in the goblet was a liquor, an unmixed draught which frothed and foamed, though without bubbling over the edge of the cup. Now I will presently explain what they consider this cup to be, and for what reason they drink from it. In any case, however, we must suppose that Tantalus was assailed by the poets for not giving rein to his tongue, but because he shared the nectar with mankind; but we must not suppose that he was really the victim of the gods' dislike, for, had he been hateful to them, he would never have been judged by the Indians to be a good man, for they are most religious people and never transgress any divine command. 3.32. THESE words of Apollonius caused the king to burst into tears, and he said: Dearest friend, in what an heroic light do you represent these Hellenes to me. Why then, O king, were you so hard upon them? The visitors who come hither from Egypt, O guest, replied the king, malign the race of Hellenes, and while declaring that they themselves are holy men and wise, and the true law-givers who fixed all the sacrifices and rites of initiation which are in vogue among the Greeks, they deny to the latter any and every sort of good quality, declaring them to be ruffians, and a mixed herd addicted to every sort of anarchy, and lovers of legend and miracle mongers, and though indeed poor, yet making their poverty not a title of dignity, but a mere excuse for stealing. But now that I have heard this from you and understand how fond of honor and how worthy the Hellenes are, I am reconciled for the future to them and I engage both that they shall have my praise and that I will pray all I can for them, and will never set trust in another Egyptian. But Iarchas remarked: I too, O king, was aware that your mind had been poisoned by these Egyptians; but I would not take the part of the Hellenes until you met some such counselor as this. But since you have been put right by a wise man, let us now proceed to quaff the good cheer provided by Tantalus, and let us sleep over the serious issues which we have to discuss tonight. But at another time I will fill you full with Hellenic arguments, and no other race is so rich in them; and you will delight in them whenever you come hither. And forthwith he set an example to this fellow guests, by stooping the first of them all to the goblet which indeed furnished an ample draught for all; for the stream refilled itself plenteously, as if with spring waters welling up from the ground; and Apollonius also drank, for this cup is instituted by the Indians as a cup of friendship; and they feign that Tantalus is the wine-bearer who supplies it, because he is considered to have been the most friendly of men.
19. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 6.5, 6.28, 6.34, 6.51 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6.5. Being asked what was the height of human bliss, he replied, To die happy. When a friend complained to him that he had lost his notes, You should have inscribed them, said he, on your mind instead of on paper. As iron is eaten away by rust, so, said he, the envious are consumed by their own passion. Those who would fain be immortal must, he declared, live piously and justly. States, said he, are doomed when they are unable to distinguish good men from bad. Once, when he was applauded by rascals, he remarked, I am horribly afraid I have done something wrong.When brothers agree, no fortress is so strong as their common life, he said. The right outfit for a voyage, he said, is such as, even if you are shipwrecked, will go through the water with you. 6.28. And he would wonder that the grammarians should investigate the ills of Odysseus, while they were ignorant of their own. Or that the musicians should tune the strings of the lyre, while leaving the dispositions of their own souls discordant; that the mathematicians should gaze at the sun and the moon, but overlook matters close at hand; that the orators should make a fuss about justice in their speeches, but never practise it; or that the avaricious should cry out against money, while inordinately fond of it. He used also to condemn those who praised honest men for being superior to money, while themselves envying the very rich. He was moved to anger that men should sacrifice to the gods to ensure health and in the midst of the sacrifice should feast to the detriment of health. He was astonished that when slaves saw their masters were gluttons, they did not steal some of the viands. 6.34. To those who said to him, You are an old man; take a rest, What? he replied, if I were running in the stadium, ought I to slacken my pace when approaching the goal? ought I not rather to put on speed? Having been invited to a dinner, he declared that he wouldn't go; for, the last time he went, his host had not expressed a proper gratitude. He would walk upon snow barefoot and do the other things mentioned above. Not only so; he even attempted to eat meat raw, but could not manage to digest it. He once found Demosthenes the orator lunching at an inn, and, when he retired within, Diogenes said, All the more you will be inside the tavern. When some strangers expressed a wish to see Demosthenes, he stretched out his middle finger and said, There goes the demagogue of Athens. 6.51. Good men he called images of the gods, and love the business of the idle. To the question what is wretched in life he replied, An old man destitute. Being asked what creature's bite is the worst, he said, of those that are wild a sycophant's; of those that are tame a flatterer's. Upon seeing two centaurs very badly painted, he asked, Which of these is Chiron? (worse man). Ingratiating speech he compared to honey used to choke you. The stomach he called livelihood's Charybdis. Hearing a report that Didymon the flute-player had been caught in adultery, his comment was, His name alone is sufficient to hang him. To the question why gold is pale, his reply was, Because it has so many thieves plotting against it. On seeing a woman carried in a litter, he remarked that the cage was not in keeping with the quarry.
20. Marinus, Vita Proclus, 29 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

21. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 717



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achaia (region) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
achilles/akhilleus Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
achilles Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36
aegean sea, currents in Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
aeneas Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
aeolian islands Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
aeschylus, and teucer Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 599
afterlife, archaic beliefs Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 595, 596
afterlife, punishment in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554
afterlife Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554, 595, 596
ajax Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36
alexandria Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
altar Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 318
ambracian (ambracius) bay or gulf Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
antioch Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
antirhium Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
antissa Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
apameia in phrygia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
apollo (god) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
apotropaic Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 317
arcesilaus Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 82
ares Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 317
aristotle, on teucer Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 599
asclepigeneia the younger Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
asclepius Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
athena Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
atlantis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
ax, w. Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 82
battlefield Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
black sea, currents of Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
boeotia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
bosporus, cimmerian Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
bosporus, thracian Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
bura Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
burkert, walter Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 596
callias Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 196
carice Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
cea (ceos, keos) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
christianity / christians Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
cibotus Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
copaic basin Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
corinthian gulf Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
corpse Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36
crates of thebes Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 82
cynics Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 82
daimones, in hesiodic afterlife Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 596
death Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 7; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
delphi, polygnotus paintings Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554
diogenes of sinope Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 82
disease Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 7
dracula Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36
earth Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
earthquakes Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
egypt, gods of Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 317
egypt Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 317
eidolon/εἴδωλον Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36
eleusis in boeotia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
elpenor Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36
elysian field Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 596
erinyes Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 595, 596
family, marriage and children Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
family Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
floods Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
fragments, of sophocles works Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 599
funerary Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 318
furies Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 196
galene Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
galilee, sea of Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
gamale Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
ghost Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36
giants, code word for christians Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
hades Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
hades (underworld) Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 595, 596
healing, menstruation Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 317, 318
healing, miraculous healing Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
healing, uterus Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 317, 318
healing Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 317
helice Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
hellespont Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
heracles Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36
heracles myth Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 196
heros of temesa Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36
hesiod, afterlife beliefs Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 595, 596
homer, afterlife in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554, 595, 596
homer Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 7; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 82
homeric motifs Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
hybris, of tantalus and prodicus Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 196
hymn Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
india Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 318
isle of the blessed Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 596
ithaca/ithaka Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
jewish war Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
laertes Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
landscapes Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
language, legislation Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 196
latin Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 318
leucas (leucadia) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
libanius Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
long, a. a. Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 596
luxury Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 196
madness Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 7
maeotic marsh or lake Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
magic, amulets Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 317
magic, incantation Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 318
magnesia near sipylus Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
marinus of neapolis Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
megarians Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 82
menedemus Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 82
mentor Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
miracle /\u2009miraculous Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
myth Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 196
nekyia Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36
nestor Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
nymphs Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
ocean Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
odysseus, underworld journey Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554
odysseus Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 82; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
odyssey Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
orchard Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
orcus Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 318
orion Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36
orphism, and the odyssey Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 596
orphism Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 196
otherworld Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
parents, maltreatment of Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 196
parody Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 82
patroclus Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36
peisistratus Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
peloponnesus Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
pelops, and tantalus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 599
persaeus Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 82
persephone Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 318
phaeacians/phaiakians Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
phegium Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
pindar, and tantalus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 599
plato, as source for prodicus Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 196
plato, on fear of dying Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554
plays, lost Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 599
pliny (the elder) Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 318
poetry, justice and the afterlife in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 595, 596
polygnotus, underworld painting Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554
porphyry Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
prayer Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
proclus (neoplatonist) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
prodicus, life Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 196
prodicus, religious beliefs Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 196
prodicus Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 82; Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 196
propontis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
proxemics Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
psukhē/ai Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36
punishment, in the afterlife Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554
pyrrha Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
quotation Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
rhetorical conventions, avoidance of gods' Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 196
rivers Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
see also landscapes, sexualized, privileged Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
see also landscapes, sexualized, public vs. private Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
shadow Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36
sipylus, mt. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
sisyphos, punishment of Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554
sisyphus Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36
snakes Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 318
socrates Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 82
sophocles, lost plays and fragments of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 599
spectre Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36
stilpo Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 82
symbol Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
tantalis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
tantalos, tantalus (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 599
tantalos Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
tantalus Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36; Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 317, 318; Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 196, 554
tartarus Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 595, 596
telemachus (hero) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
teucer Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 599
teukros, teucer (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 599
theophoric names Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 317
thracia (thrace), thracians Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
timon of phlius Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 82
titus (emperor) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
tityos, punishment of Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 554
tityus Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 36
town Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 76
tyndaris Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
typhon Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 317
underworld Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 196
violence Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 402
wealth, of prodicus Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 196
xenophanes Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 82
zeus, and punishment of mortals Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 596
zeus, and tantalus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 599