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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 11.365-11.368


βόσκει γαῖα μέλαινα πολυσπερέας ἀνθρώπουςthat the dark earth breeds, men spread all about, who make up lies from what no one can see. But the grace of words is upon you, and a good heart in you, and you've told your story skillfully, as when a singer does, the wretched woes of yourself and all the Argives.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 27-28, 26 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

26. of Helicon, and in those early day
2. Homer, Iliad, 23.304-23.350 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

23.304. /her Menelaus led beneath the yoke, and exceeding fain was she of the race. And fourth Antilochus made ready his fair-maned horses, he the peerless son of Nestor, the king high of heart, the son of Neleus; and bred at Pylos were the swift-footed horses that drew his car. And his father drew nigh and gave counsel 23.305. /to him for his profit — a wise man to one that himself had knowledge.Antilochus, for all thou art young, yet have Zeus and Poseidon loved thee and taught thee all manner of horsemanship; wherefore to teach thee is no great need, for thou knowest well how to wheel about the turning-post; yet are thy horses slowest in the race: therefore I deem there will be sorry work for thee. The horses of the others are swifter, but the men know not how to devise more cunning counsel than thine own self. Wherefore come, dear son, lay thou up in thy mind cunning of every sort, to the end that the prizes escape thee not. 23.306. /to him for his profit — a wise man to one that himself had knowledge.Antilochus, for all thou art young, yet have Zeus and Poseidon loved thee and taught thee all manner of horsemanship; wherefore to teach thee is no great need, for thou knowest well how to wheel about the turning-post; yet are thy horses slowest in the race: therefore I deem there will be sorry work for thee. The horses of the others are swifter, but the men know not how to devise more cunning counsel than thine own self. Wherefore come, dear son, lay thou up in thy mind cunning of every sort, to the end that the prizes escape thee not. 23.307. /to him for his profit — a wise man to one that himself had knowledge.Antilochus, for all thou art young, yet have Zeus and Poseidon loved thee and taught thee all manner of horsemanship; wherefore to teach thee is no great need, for thou knowest well how to wheel about the turning-post; yet are thy horses slowest in the race: therefore I deem there will be sorry work for thee. The horses of the others are swifter, but the men know not how to devise more cunning counsel than thine own self. Wherefore come, dear son, lay thou up in thy mind cunning of every sort, to the end that the prizes escape thee not. 23.308. /to him for his profit — a wise man to one that himself had knowledge.Antilochus, for all thou art young, yet have Zeus and Poseidon loved thee and taught thee all manner of horsemanship; wherefore to teach thee is no great need, for thou knowest well how to wheel about the turning-post; yet are thy horses slowest in the race: therefore I deem there will be sorry work for thee. The horses of the others are swifter, but the men know not how to devise more cunning counsel than thine own self. Wherefore come, dear son, lay thou up in thy mind cunning of every sort, to the end that the prizes escape thee not. 23.309. /to him for his profit — a wise man to one that himself had knowledge.Antilochus, for all thou art young, yet have Zeus and Poseidon loved thee and taught thee all manner of horsemanship; wherefore to teach thee is no great need, for thou knowest well how to wheel about the turning-post; yet are thy horses slowest in the race: therefore I deem there will be sorry work for thee. The horses of the others are swifter, but the men know not how to devise more cunning counsel than thine own self. Wherefore come, dear son, lay thou up in thy mind cunning of every sort, to the end that the prizes escape thee not. 23.315. /By cunning, thou knowest, is a woodman far better than by might; by cunning too doth a helmsman on the wine-dark deep guide aright a swift ship that is buffeted by winds; and by cunning doth charioteer prove better than charioteer. 23.316. /By cunning, thou knowest, is a woodman far better than by might; by cunning too doth a helmsman on the wine-dark deep guide aright a swift ship that is buffeted by winds; and by cunning doth charioteer prove better than charioteer. 23.317. /By cunning, thou knowest, is a woodman far better than by might; by cunning too doth a helmsman on the wine-dark deep guide aright a swift ship that is buffeted by winds; and by cunning doth charioteer prove better than charioteer. 23.318. /By cunning, thou knowest, is a woodman far better than by might; by cunning too doth a helmsman on the wine-dark deep guide aright a swift ship that is buffeted by winds; and by cunning doth charioteer prove better than charioteer. 23.319. /By cunning, thou knowest, is a woodman far better than by might; by cunning too doth a helmsman on the wine-dark deep guide aright a swift ship that is buffeted by winds; and by cunning doth charioteer prove better than charioteer. Another man, trusting in his horses and car 23.320. /heedlessly wheeleth wide to this side and that, and his horses roam over the course, neither keepeth he them in hand; whereas he that hath crafty mind, albeit he drive worse horses, keepeth his eye ever on the turning-post and wheeleth close thereby, neither is unmindful how at the first to force his horses with the oxhide reins 23.321. /heedlessly wheeleth wide to this side and that, and his horses roam over the course, neither keepeth he them in hand; whereas he that hath crafty mind, albeit he drive worse horses, keepeth his eye ever on the turning-post and wheeleth close thereby, neither is unmindful how at the first to force his horses with the oxhide reins 23.322. /heedlessly wheeleth wide to this side and that, and his horses roam over the course, neither keepeth he them in hand; whereas he that hath crafty mind, albeit he drive worse horses, keepeth his eye ever on the turning-post and wheeleth close thereby, neither is unmindful how at the first to force his horses with the oxhide reins 23.323. /heedlessly wheeleth wide to this side and that, and his horses roam over the course, neither keepeth he them in hand; whereas he that hath crafty mind, albeit he drive worse horses, keepeth his eye ever on the turning-post and wheeleth close thereby, neither is unmindful how at the first to force his horses with the oxhide reins 23.324. /heedlessly wheeleth wide to this side and that, and his horses roam over the course, neither keepeth he them in hand; whereas he that hath crafty mind, albeit he drive worse horses, keepeth his eye ever on the turning-post and wheeleth close thereby, neither is unmindful how at the first to force his horses with the oxhide reins 23.325. /but keepeth them ever in hand, and watcheth the man that leadeth him in the race. Now will I tell thee a manifest sign that will not escape thee. There standeth, as it were a fathom's height above the ground, a dry stump, whether of oak or of pine, which rotteth not in the rain, and two white stones on either side 23.326. /but keepeth them ever in hand, and watcheth the man that leadeth him in the race. Now will I tell thee a manifest sign that will not escape thee. There standeth, as it were a fathom's height above the ground, a dry stump, whether of oak or of pine, which rotteth not in the rain, and two white stones on either side 23.327. /but keepeth them ever in hand, and watcheth the man that leadeth him in the race. Now will I tell thee a manifest sign that will not escape thee. There standeth, as it were a fathom's height above the ground, a dry stump, whether of oak or of pine, which rotteth not in the rain, and two white stones on either side 23.328. /but keepeth them ever in hand, and watcheth the man that leadeth him in the race. Now will I tell thee a manifest sign that will not escape thee. There standeth, as it were a fathom's height above the ground, a dry stump, whether of oak or of pine, which rotteth not in the rain, and two white stones on either side 23.329. /but keepeth them ever in hand, and watcheth the man that leadeth him in the race. Now will I tell thee a manifest sign that will not escape thee. There standeth, as it were a fathom's height above the ground, a dry stump, whether of oak or of pine, which rotteth not in the rain, and two white stones on either side 23.330. /thereof are firmly set against it at the joinings of the course, and about it is smooth ground for driving. Haply it is a monnment of some man long ago dead, or haply was made the turning-post of a race in days of men of old; and now hath switft-footed goodly Achilles appointed it his turningpost. Pressing hard thereon do thou drive close thy chariot and horses, and thyself lean in thy well-plaited 23.331. /thereof are firmly set against it at the joinings of the course, and about it is smooth ground for driving. Haply it is a monnment of some man long ago dead, or haply was made the turning-post of a race in days of men of old; and now hath switft-footed goodly Achilles appointed it his turningpost. Pressing hard thereon do thou drive close thy chariot and horses, and thyself lean in thy well-plaited 23.332. /thereof are firmly set against it at the joinings of the course, and about it is smooth ground for driving. Haply it is a monnment of some man long ago dead, or haply was made the turning-post of a race in days of men of old; and now hath switft-footed goodly Achilles appointed it his turningpost. Pressing hard thereon do thou drive close thy chariot and horses, and thyself lean in thy well-plaited 23.333. /thereof are firmly set against it at the joinings of the course, and about it is smooth ground for driving. Haply it is a monnment of some man long ago dead, or haply was made the turning-post of a race in days of men of old; and now hath switft-footed goodly Achilles appointed it his turningpost. Pressing hard thereon do thou drive close thy chariot and horses, and thyself lean in thy well-plaited 23.334. /thereof are firmly set against it at the joinings of the course, and about it is smooth ground for driving. Haply it is a monnment of some man long ago dead, or haply was made the turning-post of a race in days of men of old; and now hath switft-footed goodly Achilles appointed it his turningpost. Pressing hard thereon do thou drive close thy chariot and horses, and thyself lean in thy well-plaited 23.335. /car a little to the left of the pair, and to the off horse do thou give the goad, calling to him with a shout, and give him rein from thy hand. But to the post let the near horse draw close, that the nave of the well-wrought wheel seem to graze the surface thereof— 23.336. /car a little to the left of the pair, and to the off horse do thou give the goad, calling to him with a shout, and give him rein from thy hand. But to the post let the near horse draw close, that the nave of the well-wrought wheel seem to graze the surface thereof— 23.337. /car a little to the left of the pair, and to the off horse do thou give the goad, calling to him with a shout, and give him rein from thy hand. But to the post let the near horse draw close, that the nave of the well-wrought wheel seem to graze the surface thereof— 23.338. /car a little to the left of the pair, and to the off horse do thou give the goad, calling to him with a shout, and give him rein from thy hand. But to the post let the near horse draw close, that the nave of the well-wrought wheel seem to graze the surface thereof— 23.339. /car a little to the left of the pair, and to the off horse do thou give the goad, calling to him with a shout, and give him rein from thy hand. But to the post let the near horse draw close, that the nave of the well-wrought wheel seem to graze the surface thereof— 23.340. /but be thou ware of touching the stone, lest haply thou wound thy horses and wreck thy car; so should there be joy for the rest, but reproach it for thyself. Nay, dear son, be thou wise and on thy guard; for if at the turning-post thou shalt drive past the rest in thy course 23.341. /but be thou ware of touching the stone, lest haply thou wound thy horses and wreck thy car; so should there be joy for the rest, but reproach it for thyself. Nay, dear son, be thou wise and on thy guard; for if at the turning-post thou shalt drive past the rest in thy course 23.342. /but be thou ware of touching the stone, lest haply thou wound thy horses and wreck thy car; so should there be joy for the rest, but reproach it for thyself. Nay, dear son, be thou wise and on thy guard; for if at the turning-post thou shalt drive past the rest in thy course 23.343. /but be thou ware of touching the stone, lest haply thou wound thy horses and wreck thy car; so should there be joy for the rest, but reproach it for thyself. Nay, dear son, be thou wise and on thy guard; for if at the turning-post thou shalt drive past the rest in thy course 23.344. /but be thou ware of touching the stone, lest haply thou wound thy horses and wreck thy car; so should there be joy for the rest, but reproach it for thyself. Nay, dear son, be thou wise and on thy guard; for if at the turning-post thou shalt drive past the rest in thy course 23.345. /there is no man that shall catch thee by a burst of speed, neither pass thee by, nay, not though in pursuit he were driving goodly Arion, the swift horse of Adrastus, that was of heavenly stock, or those of Laomedon, the goodly breed of this land. So saying Nestor, son of Neleus, sate him down again in his place 23.346. /there is no man that shall catch thee by a burst of speed, neither pass thee by, nay, not though in pursuit he were driving goodly Arion, the swift horse of Adrastus, that was of heavenly stock, or those of Laomedon, the goodly breed of this land. So saying Nestor, son of Neleus, sate him down again in his place 23.347. /there is no man that shall catch thee by a burst of speed, neither pass thee by, nay, not though in pursuit he were driving goodly Arion, the swift horse of Adrastus, that was of heavenly stock, or those of Laomedon, the goodly breed of this land. So saying Nestor, son of Neleus, sate him down again in his place 23.348. /there is no man that shall catch thee by a burst of speed, neither pass thee by, nay, not though in pursuit he were driving goodly Arion, the swift horse of Adrastus, that was of heavenly stock, or those of Laomedon, the goodly breed of this land. So saying Nestor, son of Neleus, sate him down again in his place 23.349. /there is no man that shall catch thee by a burst of speed, neither pass thee by, nay, not though in pursuit he were driving goodly Arion, the swift horse of Adrastus, that was of heavenly stock, or those of Laomedon, the goodly breed of this land. So saying Nestor, son of Neleus, sate him down again in his place 23.350. /when he had told his son the sum of every matter.
3. Homer, Odyssey, 4.238-4.279, 7.137, 7.140, 7.142-7.145, 7.204-7.205, 8.487-8.491, 8.552, 11.363-11.364, 11.366-11.369, 12.186-12.191, 14.122, 17.518-17.521, 19.203, 21.406-21.409 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Homeric Hymns, To Aphrodite, 82 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

82. He saw her and he wondered at the sight –
5. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 157-164, 156 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

156. You walked on craggy Cynthus or abroad
6. Theognis, Elegies, 714, 713 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Aristophanes, Birds, 688-689, 687 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

687. ἀπτῆνες ἐφημέριοι ταλαοὶ βροτοὶ ἀνέρες εἰκελόνειροι
8. Plutarch, On Talkativeness, 502 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alcinous Beneker et al., Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia (2022) 166; Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 95
aphrodite Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 94
apologoi Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 95
callimachus, as child Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 419
cattle of Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 95
charites, child, poet as Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 419
crow Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 419
cyclops Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 95
delian maidens Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 94
epiphany Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 75
ghost Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 95
hecaleius, dialogue of the birds Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 419
hecaleius, narrative structure Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 419
herdsman, and libations Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 75
herdsman, and ritual Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 75
herdsman, as psychopomp Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 75
herdsman, as trickster Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 75, 76
herdsman, in homer Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 75, 76
herdsman, leader of dreams Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 75
herodotus Beneker et al., Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia (2022) 166
hesiod, the muses address Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 94
homer, odyssey Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 75, 76
homer, on muses and poetic inspiration Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 94
homer Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 75, 76
homeric hymn to hermes Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 94
mythological cycles, theseus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 419
mêtis' Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 94
nekyia Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 95
nestor Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 94
odysseus, and hermes Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 75, 76
odysseus, as a poet-like figure Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 94
odysseus, in phaeacia Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 75
odysseus Beneker et al., Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia (2022) 166; Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 95
pepaideumenoi Beneker et al., Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences: Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia (2022) 166
phaeacians Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 75
sirens Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 94
theseus, reception at house of hecale Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 419