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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 11.121-11.133
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οὐδʼ ἐυήρεʼ ἐρετμά, τά τε πτερὰ νηυσὶ πέλονται.nor well-shaped oars that are the wings for ships. I'll tell you a sign, a very clear one, and it won't escape your notice. When another wayfarer meets you and says you have a winnowing fan on your dazzling shoulder, right then stick your well-shaped oar into the ground
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ῥέξας ἱερὰ καλὰ Ποσειδάωνι ἄνακτιand offer fine sacred victims to lord Poseidon, a ram, a bull, and a boar that mates with pigs. Depart for home and offer sacred hecatombs to the immortal gods, who hold wide heaven, to all, one right after another. Death will come to you yourself
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

29 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.351-1.352, 1.416-1.418, 1.505-1.506, 6.358, 9.189, 13.1-13.9, 18.59-18.60, 18.95-18.96, 18.458, 21.277-21.278 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.351. /Earnestly he prayed to his dear mother with hands outstretched:Mother, since you bore me, though to so brief a span of life, honour surely ought the Olympian to have given into my hands, Zeus who thunders on high; but now he has honoured me not a bit. Truly the son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon 1.352. /Earnestly he prayed to his dear mother with hands outstretched:Mother, since you bore me, though to so brief a span of life, honour surely ought the Olympian to have given into my hands, Zeus who thunders on high; but now he has honoured me not a bit. Truly the son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon 1.416. /since your span of life is brief and endures no long time; but now you are doomed to a speedy death and are laden with sorrow above all men; therefore to an evil fate I bore you in our halls. Yet in order to tell this your word to Zeus who delights in the thunderbolt I will myself go to snowy Olympus, in hope that he may be persuaded. 1.417. /since your span of life is brief and endures no long time; but now you are doomed to a speedy death and are laden with sorrow above all men; therefore to an evil fate I bore you in our halls. Yet in order to tell this your word to Zeus who delights in the thunderbolt I will myself go to snowy Olympus, in hope that he may be persuaded. 1.418. /since your span of life is brief and endures no long time; but now you are doomed to a speedy death and are laden with sorrow above all men; therefore to an evil fate I bore you in our halls. Yet in order to tell this your word to Zeus who delights in the thunderbolt I will myself go to snowy Olympus, in hope that he may be persuaded. 1.505. /yet now Agamemnon, king of men, has dishonoured him, for he has taken and keeps his prize by his own arrogant act. But honour him, Olympian Zeus, lord of counsel; and give might to the Trojans, until the Achaeans do honour to my son, and magnify him with recompense. 1.506. /yet now Agamemnon, king of men, has dishonoured him, for he has taken and keeps his prize by his own arrogant act. But honour him, Olympian Zeus, lord of counsel; and give might to the Trojans, until the Achaeans do honour to my son, and magnify him with recompense. 6.358. /my brother, since above all others has trouble encompassed thy heart because of shameless me, and the folly of Alexander; on whom Zeus hath brought an evil doom, that even in days to come we may be a song for men that are yet to be. Then made answer to her great Hector of the flashing helm: 9.189. /And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 13.1. /Now Zeus, when he had brought the Trojans and Hector to the ships, left the combatants there to have toil and woe unceasingly, but himself turned away his bright eyes, and looked afar, upon the land of the Thracian horsemen 13.2. /Now Zeus, when he had brought the Trojans and Hector to the ships, left the combatants there to have toil and woe unceasingly, but himself turned away his bright eyes, and looked afar, upon the land of the Thracian horsemen 13.3. /Now Zeus, when he had brought the Trojans and Hector to the ships, left the combatants there to have toil and woe unceasingly, but himself turned away his bright eyes, and looked afar, upon the land of the Thracian horsemen 13.4. /Now Zeus, when he had brought the Trojans and Hector to the ships, left the combatants there to have toil and woe unceasingly, but himself turned away his bright eyes, and looked afar, upon the land of the Thracian horsemen 13.5. /Now Zeus, when he had brought the Trojans and Hector to the ships, left the combatants there to have toil and woe unceasingly, but himself turned away his bright eyes, and looked afar, upon the land of the Thracian horsemen 13.5. /and of the Mysians that fight in close combat, and of the lordly Hippemolgi that drink the milk of mares, and of the Abii, the most righteous of men. To Troy he no longer in any wise turned his bright eyes, for he deemed not in his heart that any of the immortals would draw nigh to aid either Trojans or Danaans. 13.6. /and of the Mysians that fight in close combat, and of the lordly Hippemolgi that drink the milk of mares, and of the Abii, the most righteous of men. To Troy he no longer in any wise turned his bright eyes, for he deemed not in his heart that any of the immortals would draw nigh to aid either Trojans or Danaans. 13.7. /and of the Mysians that fight in close combat, and of the lordly Hippemolgi that drink the milk of mares, and of the Abii, the most righteous of men. To Troy he no longer in any wise turned his bright eyes, for he deemed not in his heart that any of the immortals would draw nigh to aid either Trojans or Danaans. 13.8. /and of the Mysians that fight in close combat, and of the lordly Hippemolgi that drink the milk of mares, and of the Abii, the most righteous of men. To Troy he no longer in any wise turned his bright eyes, for he deemed not in his heart that any of the immortals would draw nigh to aid either Trojans or Danaans. 13.9. /and of the Mysians that fight in close combat, and of the lordly Hippemolgi that drink the milk of mares, and of the Abii, the most righteous of men. To Troy he no longer in any wise turned his bright eyes, for he deemed not in his heart that any of the immortals would draw nigh to aid either Trojans or Danaans. 18.59. /for after I had borne a son peerless and stalwart, pre-eminent among warriors, and he shot up like a sapling; then when I had reared him as a tree in a rich orchard plot, I sent him forth in the beaked ships to Ilios to war with the Trojans; but never again shall I welcome him 18.60. /back to his home, to the house of Peleus. And while yet he liveth, and beholdeth the light of the sun, he hath sorrow, neither can I anywise help him, though I go to him. Howbeit go I will, that I may behold my dear child, and hear what grief has come upon him while yet he abideth aloof from the war. 18.95. / Doomed then to a speedy death, my child, shalt thou be, that thou spakest thus; for straightway after Hector is thine own death ready at hand. 18.96. / Doomed then to a speedy death, my child, shalt thou be, that thou spakest thus; for straightway after Hector is thine own death ready at hand. 18.458. /after the valiant son of Menoetius had wrought sore harm, Apollo slew him amid the foremost fighters and gave glory to Hector. Therefore am I now come to thy knees, if so be thou wilt be minded to give my son, that is doomed to a speedy death, shield and helmet, and goodly greaves fitted with ankle-pieces 21.277. /None other of the heavenly gods do I blame so much, but only my dear mother, that beguiled me with false words, saying that beneath the wall of the mail-clad Trojans I should perish by the swift missiles of Apollo. Would that Hector had slain me, the best of the men bred here; 21.278. /None other of the heavenly gods do I blame so much, but only my dear mother, that beguiled me with false words, saying that beneath the wall of the mail-clad Trojans I should perish by the swift missiles of Apollo. Would that Hector had slain me, the best of the men bred here;
2. Homer, Odyssey, 1.3, 3.267-3.272, 4.17, 10.487-10.488, 10.490-10.495, 11.5-11.120, 11.122-11.225, 11.227-11.332, 11.387-11.464, 11.622-11.626, 11.630-11.631, 12.37-12.110, 13.393-13.415, 14.316-14.335, 15.170-15.178, 19.287-19.302, 23.239-23.246, 23.248-23.250, 23.266-23.284, 24.80-24.92, 24.192-24.202, 24.412, 24.415-24.419, 24.426-24.429, 24.433, 24.522-24.548 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 40 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

40. Ida’s dark hills, Phocaea and Scyros
4. Aeschylus, Persians, 605-842, 604 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

604. ἐν ὄμμασιν τἀνταῖα φαίνεται θεῶν
5. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 6.68-6.74, 8.1-8.7 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Euripides, Alcestis, 743 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 520-522, 922-927, 48 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Herodotus, Histories, 2.50, 4.13, 5.92, 8.134 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.50. In fact, the names of nearly all the gods came to Hellas from Egypt . For I am convinced by inquiry that they have come from foreign parts, and I believe that they came chiefly from Egypt . ,Except the names of Poseidon and the Dioscuri, as I have already said, and Hera, and Hestia, and Themis, and the Graces, and the Nereids, the names of all the gods have always existed in Egypt . I only say what the Egyptians themselves say. The gods whose names they say they do not know were, as I think, named by the Pelasgians, except Poseidon, the knowledge of whom they learned from the Libyans. ,Alone of all nations the Libyans have had among them the name of Poseidon from the beginning, and they have always honored this god. The Egyptians, however, are not accustomed to pay any honors to heroes. 4.13. There is also a story related in a poem by Aristeas son of Caüstrobius, a man of Proconnesus . This Aristeas, possessed by Phoebus, visited the Issedones; beyond these (he said) live the one-eyed Arimaspians, beyond whom are the griffins that guard gold, and beyond these again the Hyperboreans, whose territory reaches to the sea. ,Except for the Hyperboreans, all these nations (and first the Arimaspians) are always at war with their neighbors; the Issedones were pushed from their lands by the Arimaspians, and the Scythians by the Issedones, and the Cimmerians, living by the southern sea, were hard pressed by the Scythians and left their country. Thus Aristeas' story does not agree with the Scythian account about this country. 5.92. These were the words of the Lacedaemonians, but their words were ill-received by the greater part of their allies. The rest then keeping silence, Socles, a Corinthian, said, ,“In truth heaven will be beneath the earth and the earth aloft above the heaven, and men will dwell in the sea and fishes where men dwelt before, now that you, Lacedaemonians, are destroying the rule of equals and making ready to bring back tyranny into the cities, tyranny, a thing more unrighteous and bloodthirsty than anything else on this earth. ,If indeed it seems to you to be a good thing that the cities be ruled by tyrants, set up a tyrant among yourselves first and then seek to set up such for the rest. As it is, however, you, who have never made trial of tyrants and take the greatest precautions that none will arise at Sparta, deal wrongfully with your allies. If you had such experience of that thing as we have, you would be more prudent advisers concerning it than you are now.” ,The Corinthian state was ordered in such manner as I will show.There was an oligarchy, and this group of men, called the Bacchiadae, held sway in the city, marrying and giving in marriage among themselves. Now Amphion, one of these men, had a crippled daughter, whose name was Labda. Since none of the Bacchiadae would marry her, she was wedded to Eetion son of Echecrates, of the township of Petra, a Lapith by lineage and of the posterity of Caeneus. ,When no sons were born to him by this wife or any other, he set out to Delphi to enquire concerning the matter of acquiring offspring. As soon as he entered, the Pythian priestess spoke these verses to him: quote type="oracle" l met="dact" Eetion,worthy of honor, no man honors you. /l l Labda is with child, and her child will be a millstone /l lWhich will fall upon the rulers and will bring justice to Corinth. /l /quote ,This oracle which was given to Eetion was in some way made known to the Bacchiadae. The earlier oracle sent to Corinth had not been understood by them, despite the fact that its meaning was the same as the meaning of the oracle of Eetion, and it read as follows: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"An eagle in the rocks has conceived, and will bring forth a lion, /l lStrong and fierce. The knees of many will it loose. /l lThis consider well, Corinthians, /l lYou who dwell by lovely Pirene and the overhanging heights of Corinth. /l /quote ,This earlier prophecy had been unintelligible to the Bacchiadae, but as soon as they heard the one which was given to Eetion, they understood it at once, recognizing its similarity with the oracle of Eetion. Now understanding both oracles, they kept quiet but resolved to do away with the offspring of Eetion. Then, as soon as his wife had given birth, they sent ten men of their clan to the township where Eetion dwelt to kill the child. ,These men came to Petra and passing into Eetion's courtyard, asked for the child. Labda, knowing nothing of the purpose of their coming and thinking that they wished to see the baby out of affection for its father, brought it and placed it into the hands of one of them. Now they had planned on their way that the first of them who received the child should dash it to the ground. ,When, however, Labda brought and handed over the child, by divine chance it smiled at the man who took it. This he saw, and compassion prevented him from killing it. Filled with pity, he handed it to a second, and this man again to a third.In fact it passed from hand to hand to each of the ten, for none would make an end of it. ,They then gave the child back to its mother, and after going out, they stood before the door reproaching and upbraiding one another, but chiefly him who had first received it since he had not acted in accordance with their agreement. Finally they resolved to go in again and all have a hand in the killing. ,Fate, however, had decreed that Eetion's offspring should be the source of ills for Corinth, for Labda, standing close to this door, heard all this. Fearing that they would change their minds and that they would take and actually kill the child, she took it away and hid it where she thought it would be hardest to find, in a chest, for she knew that if they returned and set about searching they would seek in every place—which in fact they did. ,They came and searched, but when they did not find it, they resolved to go off and say to those who had sent them that they had carried out their orders. They then went away and said this. ,Eetion's son, however, grew up, and because of his escape from that danger, he was called Cypselus, after the chest. When he had reached manhood and was seeking a divination, an oracle of double meaning was given him at Delphi. Putting faith in this, he made an attempt on Corinth and won it. ,The oracle was as follows: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"That man is fortunate who steps into my house, /l l Cypselus, son of Eetion, the king of noble Corinth, /l lHe himself and his children, but not the sons of his sons. /l /quote Such was the oracle. Cypselus, however, when he had gained the tyranny, conducted himself in this way: many of the Corinthians he drove into exile, many he deprived of their wealth, and by far the most he had killed. ,After a reign of thirty years, he died in the height of prosperity, and was succeeded by his son Periander. Now Periander was to begin with milder than his father, but after he had held converse by messenger with Thrasybulus the tyrant of Miletus, he became much more bloodthirsty than Cypselus. ,He had sent a herald to Thrasybulus and inquired in what way he would best and most safely govern his city. Thrasybulus led the man who had come from Periander outside the town, and entered into a sown field. As he walked through the corn, continually asking why the messenger had come to him from Corinth, he kept cutting off all the tallest ears of wheat which he could see, and throwing them away, until he had destroyed the best and richest part of the crop. ,Then, after passing through the place and speaking no word of counsel, he sent the herald away. When the herald returned to Corinth, Periander desired to hear what counsel he brought, but the man said that Thrasybulus had given him none. The herald added that it was a strange man to whom he had been sent, a madman and a destroyer of his own possessions, telling Periander what he had seen Thrasybulus do. ,Periander, however, understood what had been done, and perceived that Thrasybulus had counselled him to slay those of his townsmen who were outstanding in influence or ability; with that he began to deal with his citizens in an evil manner. Whatever act of slaughter or banishment Cypselus had left undone, that Periander brought to accomplishment. In a single day he stripped all the women of Corinth naked, because of his own wife Melissa. ,Periander had sent messengers to the Oracle of the Dead on the river Acheron in Thesprotia to enquire concerning a deposit that a friend had left, but Melissa, in an apparition, said that she would tell him nothing, nor reveal where the deposit lay, for she was cold and naked. The garments, she said, with which Periander had buried with her had never been burnt, and were of no use to her. Then, as evidence for her husband that she spoke the truth, she added that Periander had put his loaves into a cold oven. ,When this message was brought back to Periander (for he had had intercourse with the dead body of Melissa and knew her token for true), immediately after the message he made a proclamation that all the Corinthian women should come out into the temple of Hera. They then came out as to a festival, wearing their most beautiful garments, and Periander set his guards there and stripped them all alike, ladies and serving-women, and heaped all the clothes in a pit, where, as he prayed to Melissa, he burnt them. ,When he had done this and sent a second message, the ghost of Melissa told him where the deposit of the friend had been laid. “This, then, Lacedaimonians, is the nature of tyranny, and such are its deeds. ,We Corinthians marvelled greatly when we saw that you were sending for Hippias, and now we marvel yet more at your words to us. We entreat you earnestly in the name of the gods of Hellas not to establish tyranny in the cities, but if you do not cease from so doing and unrighteously attempt to bring Hippias back, be assured that you are proceeding without the Corinthians' consent.” 8.134. This man Mys is known to have gone to Lebadea and to have bribed a man of the country to go down into the cave of Trophonius and to have gone to the place of divination at Abae in Phocis. He went first to Thebes where he inquired of Ismenian Apollo (sacrifice is there the way of divination, as at Olympia), and moreover he bribed one who was no Theban but a stranger to lie down to sleep in the shrine of Amphiaraus. ,No Theban may seek a prophecy there, for Amphiaraus bade them by an oracle to choose which of the two they wanted and forgo the other, and take him either for their prophet or for their ally. They chose that he should be their ally. Therefore no Theban may lie down to sleep in that place.
9. Sophocles, Antigone, 1005-1011, 988-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 21 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Sophocles, Philoctetes, 72 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Ennius, Varia, 18 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

13. Horace, Odes, 3.30.6-3.30.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

14. Ovid, Amores, 1.15.42 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 15.875-15.876 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.588-1.589, 2.590, 6.35, 6.103-6.123, 6.262-6.263, 6.321, 6.628 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.588. the bastioned gates; the uproar of the throng. 1.589. The Tyrians toil unwearied; some up-raise 2.590. The Greek besiegers to the roof-tops fled; 6.35. And Queen Pasiphae's brute-human son 6.103. In swift confusion! Sing thyself, I pray.” 6.104. So ceased his voice; the virgin through the cave 6.105. Scarce bridled yet by Phoebus' hand divine 6.106. Ecstatic swept along, and vainly stove 6.107. To fing its potent master from her breast; 6.108. But he more strongly plied his rein and curb 6.109. Upon her frenzied lips, and soon subdued 6.110. Her spirit fierce, and swayed her at his will. 6.111. Free and self-moved the cavern's hundred adoors 6.112. Swung open wide, and uttered to the air 6.113. The oracles the virgin-priestess sung : 6.114. “Thy long sea-perils thou hast safely passed; 6.115. But heavier woes await thee on the land. 6.116. Truly thy Trojans to Lavinian shore 6.117. Shall come—vex not thyself thereon—but, oh! 6.118. Shall rue their coming thither! war, red war! 6.119. And Tiber stained with bloody foam I see. 6.120. Simois, Xanthus, and the Dorian horde 6.121. Thou shalt behold; a new Achilles now 6.122. In Latium breathes,—he, too, of goddess born; 6.123. And Juno, burden of the sons of Troy 6.262. 0 heavenly mother!” So saying, his steps lie stayed 6.263. Close watching whither they should signal give; 6.321. The priestess sprinkled wine; 'twixt the two horns 6.628. Around him left and right the crowding shades
17. Apollodorus, Epitome, 3.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.7. ὁ δὲ οὐ βουλόμενος 1 -- στρατεύεσθαι προσποιεῖται μανίαν. Παλαμήδης δὲ ὁ Ναυπλίου ἤλεγξε τὴν μανίαν ψευδῆ, καὶ προσποιησαμένῳ 2 -- μεμηνέναι παρηκολούθει· ἁρπάσας δὲ Τηλέμαχον ἐκ τοῦ κόλπου τῆς Πηνελόπης 3 -- ὡς κτενῶν ἐξιφούλκει. Ὀδυσσεὺς δὲ περὶ τοῦ παιδὸς εὐλαβηθεὶς ὡμολόγησε τὴν προσποίητον μανίαν καὶ στρατεύεται. 3.7. But he, not wishing to go to the war, feigned madness. However, Palamedes, son of Nauplius, proved his madness to be fictitious; and when Ulysses pretended to rave, Palamedes followed him, and snatching Telemachus from Penelope's bosom, drew his sword as if he would kill him. And in his fear for the child Ulysses confessed that his madness was pretended, and he went to the war. As to the madness which Ulysses feigned in order to escape going to the Trojan war, see Proclus in Epicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. G. Kinkel, p. 18 ; Lucian, De domo 30 ; Philostratus, Her. xi.2 ; Tzetzes, Scholiast on Lycophron 818 ; Cicero, De officiis iii.26.97 ; Hyginus, Fab. 95 ; Serv. Verg. A. 2.81 ; Lactantius Placidus on Statius, Achill. i.93 ; Scriptores rerum mythicarum Latini, ed. Bode, i. pp. 12, 140ff. (First Vatican Mythographer 35; Second Vatican Mythographer 200) . The usual story seems to have been that to support his pretence of insanity Ulysses yoked an ox and a horse or an ass to the plough and sowed salt. While he was busy fertilizing the fields in this fashion, the Greek envoys arrived, and Palamedes, seeing through the deception, laid the infant son of Ulysses in front of the plough, whereupon the father at once checked the plough and betrayed his sanity. However, Lucian agrees with Apollodorus in saying that Palamedes threatened the child with his sword, though at the same time, by mentioning the unlike animals yoked together, he shows that he had the scene of the ploughing in his mind. His description purports to be based on a picture, probably a famous picture of the scene which was still exhibited at Ephesus in the time of Pliny, Nat. Hist. xxxv.129 . Sophocles wrote a play on the subject, called The Mad Ulysses . See The Fragments of Sophocles, ed. A. C. Pearson, vol. ii. pp. 115ff.
18. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.131-1.133, 7.7-7.20, 7.24, 7.29-7.44, 8.584-8.586 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.9, 7.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20. Plutarch, Pompey, 68.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Silius Italicus, Punica, 13.466-13.487, 13.499-13.500, 13.504-13.505, 13.514-13.516, 13.615-13.649, 13.658-13.660, 13.663-13.665, 13.670, 13.699 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Statius, Achilleis, 1.611 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

23. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 6.14-6.15 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

24. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 7.21.12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.21.12. Before the sanctuary of Demeter is a spring. On the side of this towards the temple stands a wall of stones, while on the outer side has been made a descent to the spring. Here there is an infallible oracle, not indeed for everything, but only in the case of sick folk. They tie a mirror to a fine cord and let it down, judging the distance so that it does not sink deep into the spring, but just far enough to touch the water with its rim. Or, possibly “disk.” The round mirror might be lowered vertically or horizontally (face upwards). Then they pray to the goddess and burn incense, after which they look into the mirror, which shows them the patient either alive or dead.
25. Philostratus The Athenian, On Heroes, 33.4 (2nd cent. CE

26. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 9.111 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

9.111. There are also reputed works of his extending to twenty thousand verses which are mentioned by Antigonus of Carystus, who also wrote his life. There are three silli in which, from his point of view as a Sceptic, he abuses every one and lampoons the dogmatic philosophers, using the form of parody. In the first he speaks in the first person throughout, the second and third are in the form of dialogues; for he represents himself as questioning Xenophanes of Colophon about each philosopher in turn, while Xenophanes answers him; in the second he speaks of the more ancient philosophers, in the third of the later, which is why some have entitled it the Epilogue.
27. Philostratus, Heroicus, 33.4 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

28. Florus Lucius Annaeus, Epitome Bellorum Omnium Annorum Dcc, 2.13.45

29. Quintus Smyrnaeus, Posthomerica, 1.153-1.156, 1.488-1.491, 2.198-2.199, 3.63-3.65, 3.699



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abioi Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 250
absence Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56, 59
achilles, death/immortality and Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
achilles, death of Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 262
achilles, funeral of, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56
achilles Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 38; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56
aegisthus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 59
aeneas Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301; Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
agamemnon Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301; Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 59
aiaia Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 38
amasis Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 52
amazons Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 262
anachrony Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
analepsis, prolepsis Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
antikleia Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
aoroi Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
apollo, achilles and Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 262
apollo, and the dead Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 98
apollo, homeric hymn Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
apollo, ismenios, oracle of Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 98
apollo, origins and development Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 72
apollo Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
apostles, jesus Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
apotropaic Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
appius (claudius pulcher) Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
architectural remains, sanctuaries Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
aristophanes Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 208
artemis, at claros Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
artemis, homeric hymn Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
athena Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 31; Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56, 59
athena soteira nike, and zeus soter Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 122
athena soteira nike, on mt boreius Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 122
audience Ercolani and Giordano,Literature in Ancient Greek Culture: The Comparative Perspective (2016) 39
authority, authoritative Ercolani and Giordano,Literature in Ancient Greek Culture: The Comparative Perspective (2016) 39
authority, narrators Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 52
authority, poetic Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 59
bacchus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
barthes, roland Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 38
calypso Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56
camena Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 187
cameron, alan Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
capitoline tablet Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
captatio (legacy hunting) Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 208
catoptromancy (mirror divination) Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 98
cave Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 250
cerberus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
chorus, cf. choregia, choregos Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
circe Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 38; Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 223
claros Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
clytemnestra Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 59
competition Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 250
continuity Ercolani and Giordano,Literature in Ancient Greek Culture: The Comparative Perspective (2016) 39
cornelia, antitype to penelope Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 203
counterfactuals Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
cycle Ercolani and Giordano,Literature in Ancient Greek Culture: The Comparative Perspective (2016) 39
cyprian songs, on odysseuss madness Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 588
daemonology Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 223, 224, 225, 226, 227
daimon Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
death and temporality, human desire for glory (kleos) in greco-roman literature Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
death and temporality, in homer Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
death and temporality Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
del rio, m. Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
delphi Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288; Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 52; Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
delphic oracle Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
demaratus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 52
demodocus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 59
des griechischen götterglaubens Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 72
diotima Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
doubleness, and counterfactuals Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
dreams Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 52
dynamis Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
elpenor Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
empyromancy, empura (fire divination) Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 98
ennius Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
enthusiastic prophecy Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 97, 98
epeius Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 262
euripides Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
falernus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
faraone, christopher Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
faustus, dr. Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 224
femininity Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
flattery Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 208
fragments, of sophocles works Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 588
funeral games Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 262
gender, and biological sex Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
gods, the absence of their providence in lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 187
goethe, j. w. von Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 224
gold Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 250
hades/pluto Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
hades Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56
harder, m. annette Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
hecate Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
hector Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
heidegger, martin Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 32
helen Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 38
helen of troy Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
hellespont, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56
heracles Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
hermes Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
heroe, heroic Ercolani and Giordano,Literature in Ancient Greek Culture: The Comparative Perspective (2016) 39
heroic ideal Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56, 59
hicks, benjamin Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 208
hippēmolgoi Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 250
historiography, and homer Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 32
hollmann, a. Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 52
homer, and historiography Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 32
homer, comparison of iliad with odyssey Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 32
homer, homeric Ercolani and Giordano,Literature in Ancient Greek Culture: The Comparative Perspective (2016) 39
homer, iliad, death/temporality in Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
homer, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 187, 203, 204
homer, odyssey, death/immortality and Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
homer, on death and temporality Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
homer, on poseidon Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 72
homer Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56, 59; Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 32
honey, use of, in ritual Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 223
hydromancy (water divination) Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 98
identity Ercolani and Giordano,Literature in Ancient Greek Culture: The Comparative Perspective (2016) 39
iliad, and anachronism Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
iliad Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 250
immortality, human desire for glory (kleos) and Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
immortality Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56, 59
initiation Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
initiation and divination Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 97
ithaca Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 31, 32; Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 262; Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 250; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56, 59
jason Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 52
justice Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 250
killing Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
landscape Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 250
livius andronicus, model and anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 187
locusts Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 262
lucian, on death and temporality Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
lusis Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 262
madness of odysseus, the (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 588
maecenas, positioning in horaces audience Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 208
magia naturalis Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
magic, kinds of Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
mana Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
marriage, sacred Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
marriage Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56, 59
martin, richard Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 38
masculinity Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
master of signs, herodotean Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 52
memory Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56
menelaus Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 59
milk, use of, in libations Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 223
milk Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 250
mode, historiographical Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 52
mourning Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 262
muses Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 52
mysians Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 250
myth, and geography Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56, 59
nagy, gregory Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 38
narrative Ercolani and Giordano,Literature in Ancient Greek Culture: The Comparative Perspective (2016) 39
necromancy Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288; Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 97, 98; Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 223, 224, 225, 226, 227
nestor Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 59
nilsson, martin, on poseidon Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 72
nomads Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 250
nostos, as master-trope explored by lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 187, 203, 204
oblivion Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56
odusseus akanthoplex (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 588
odusseus mainomenos (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 588
odysseus, death/temporality and Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
odysseus, poseidon and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 72
odysseus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301; Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 31, 32; Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 262; Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 38; Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288; Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 187, 203, 204; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 588; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56, 59; Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 52
odysseus wounded by the spine (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 588
odyssey, temporality Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
odyssey Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 31; Ercolani and Giordano,Literature in Ancient Greek Culture: The Comparative Perspective (2016) 39; Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 250
odyssey (homer), and odysseus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 588
ogden, d. Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
olympia, oracle and sanctuary of zeus at Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 98
oracles Ercolani and Giordano,Literature in Ancient Greek Culture: The Comparative Perspective (2016) 39; Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 52; Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
palace Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 31
palamedes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 588
panhellenism Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56, 59
paris (homeric character) Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
pausanias Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
penelope Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 262; Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 38; Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 203; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56, 59
penelope (wife of odysseus) Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
penthesileia, at troy Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 262
periander and his wife Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 97, 98
persephone Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
persona of horace, contrasted with protagonists of the satires Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 208
philoctetes, encounter with paris Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 262
phthia Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56
pirithoos Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
plato Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
plausible lie Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56, 59
plays, lost Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 588
pluto Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
poetic patronage Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 59
poetry, and aristocratic power Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56, 59
poetry, as a remedy against oblivion Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 59
polycrates Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 52
pompey, as anti-odyssean Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 203, 204
pomponia, mother of scipio africanus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
porta, g. della Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
poseidon, alongside a saviour god Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 122
poseidon, anger of Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 72
poseidon, origins and development Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 72
poseidon, sacrifice/sacrificial rituals for Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 72
poseidon, sea, as god of Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 72
poseidon Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 32; Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 72
preller, ludwig Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 72
prendergast, christopher Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
proclus, on odysseuss madness Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 588
prolepsis Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
prophecy, tiresias Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
prophecy Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 59
psuchopompos Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
psychagôgia Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
punic wars, second Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
pythia Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
rhipaean mountains Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 250
sacrifice/sacrificial rituals, for poseidon Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 72
sacrifice/sacrificial rituals, suovetaurelia Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 72
sacrifice/sacrificial rituals, triple sacrifices Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 72
satires (horace), literary influences on Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 208
scipio africanus, and achilles Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
scipio africanus, as son of jupiter Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
scipio africanus, imitatio of alexander the great by Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
scipio africanus, katabasis of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
scipio africanus, meeting with homer Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
sea and seafarers, poseidon as god of Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 72
sesostris, signs, reading of Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 52
sexuality, sexual intercourse Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
sibyl, deiphobe Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
sibyl Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301; Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
silius italicus, and ennius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
silius italicus, and homer Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
silius italicus, and lucretius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
silius italicus, and virgil Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
silius italicus, nekyia in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
similes, natural world Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 262
socrates Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
sophocles, lost plays and fragments of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 588
sources, historiographical approach to Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 52
sparta Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 59
storms Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 262
suitors Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 31
suovetaurelia Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 72
teiresias Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301; Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 38; Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49; Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 52; Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212; Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
telegonus Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 38; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 588
telegony Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 32
telemachus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 31; Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 38; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 588
temporality, anachrony and prolepsis Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
temporality, and counterfactuals Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
theodicy Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 32
theseus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
thrace Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 250
time Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
tiresias, prophecy Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
tiresias Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 31, 32; Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 98; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56, 59; Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9, 223; Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
tradition, traditional Ercolani and Giordano,Literature in Ancient Greek Culture: The Comparative Perspective (2016) 39
triple sacrifices Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 72
trojan war, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56, 59
trojan war Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 38
trophonius Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 97
troy Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56
troy xvi Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 38
ulysses, portrayal in satires Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 208
underworld Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
vengeance Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
venus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
violence Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 250
votives' Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
war Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 250
wine, use of, in libations Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 223
wrath, achilles Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 56
zeus, thunder and lightning of Bär et al, Quintus of Smyrna’s 'Posthomerica': Writing Homer Under Rome (2022) 262
zeus Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
zeus soter, in rhamnus Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 122
zeus soter, in the piraeus Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 122
zeus soter, in thebes Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 122