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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 11.100


νόστον δίζηαι μελιηδέα, φαίδιμʼ Ὀδυσσεῦ·'You seek, brilliant Odysseus, a honey-sweet return, but a god will make that difficult for you, for I don't think Earth-shaker will miss it, who's put resentment in his heart for you, enraged that you blinded his beloved son. But even so, though you suffer evils, you may still reach home


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

21 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.358 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.358. /my brother, since above all others has trouble encompassed thy heart because of shameless me, and the folly of Alexander; on whom Zeus hath brought an evil doom, that even in days to come we may be a song for men that are yet to be. Then made answer to her great Hector of the flashing helm:
2. Homer, Odyssey, 10.64, 10.72-10.75, 10.121-10.132, 10.487-10.488, 10.490-10.495, 11.5-11.99, 11.101-11.225, 11.227-11.332, 11.387-11.464, 11.622-11.626, 11.630-11.631, 12.37-12.110, 12.137-12.141, 12.169, 12.374-12.390, 13.393-13.415, 23.239-23.246, 23.248-23.250, 23.253, 24.192-24.202 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 40 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

40. Ida’s dark hills, Phocaea and Scyros
4. Aeschylus, Persians, 605-842, 604 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

604. ἐν ὄμμασιν τἀνταῖα φαίνεται θεῶν
5. Heraclitus of Ephesus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Parmenides, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 6.68-6.74, 8.1-8.7 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Euripides, Alcestis, 743 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Herodotus, Histories, 5.92, 7.142, 8.134 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.92. These were the words of the Lacedaemonians, but their words were ill-received by the greater part of their allies. The rest then keeping silence, Socles, a Corinthian, said, ,“In truth heaven will be beneath the earth and the earth aloft above the heaven, and men will dwell in the sea and fishes where men dwelt before, now that you, Lacedaemonians, are destroying the rule of equals and making ready to bring back tyranny into the cities, tyranny, a thing more unrighteous and bloodthirsty than anything else on this earth. ,If indeed it seems to you to be a good thing that the cities be ruled by tyrants, set up a tyrant among yourselves first and then seek to set up such for the rest. As it is, however, you, who have never made trial of tyrants and take the greatest precautions that none will arise at Sparta, deal wrongfully with your allies. If you had such experience of that thing as we have, you would be more prudent advisers concerning it than you are now.” ,The Corinthian state was ordered in such manner as I will show.There was an oligarchy, and this group of men, called the Bacchiadae, held sway in the city, marrying and giving in marriage among themselves. Now Amphion, one of these men, had a crippled daughter, whose name was Labda. Since none of the Bacchiadae would marry her, she was wedded to Eetion son of Echecrates, of the township of Petra, a Lapith by lineage and of the posterity of Caeneus. ,When no sons were born to him by this wife or any other, he set out to Delphi to enquire concerning the matter of acquiring offspring. As soon as he entered, the Pythian priestess spoke these verses to him: quote type="oracle" l met="dact" Eetion,worthy of honor, no man honors you. /l l Labda is with child, and her child will be a millstone /l lWhich will fall upon the rulers and will bring justice to Corinth. /l /quote ,This oracle which was given to Eetion was in some way made known to the Bacchiadae. The earlier oracle sent to Corinth had not been understood by them, despite the fact that its meaning was the same as the meaning of the oracle of Eetion, and it read as follows: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"An eagle in the rocks has conceived, and will bring forth a lion, /l lStrong and fierce. The knees of many will it loose. /l lThis consider well, Corinthians, /l lYou who dwell by lovely Pirene and the overhanging heights of Corinth. /l /quote ,This earlier prophecy had been unintelligible to the Bacchiadae, but as soon as they heard the one which was given to Eetion, they understood it at once, recognizing its similarity with the oracle of Eetion. Now understanding both oracles, they kept quiet but resolved to do away with the offspring of Eetion. Then, as soon as his wife had given birth, they sent ten men of their clan to the township where Eetion dwelt to kill the child. ,These men came to Petra and passing into Eetion's courtyard, asked for the child. Labda, knowing nothing of the purpose of their coming and thinking that they wished to see the baby out of affection for its father, brought it and placed it into the hands of one of them. Now they had planned on their way that the first of them who received the child should dash it to the ground. ,When, however, Labda brought and handed over the child, by divine chance it smiled at the man who took it. This he saw, and compassion prevented him from killing it. Filled with pity, he handed it to a second, and this man again to a third.In fact it passed from hand to hand to each of the ten, for none would make an end of it. ,They then gave the child back to its mother, and after going out, they stood before the door reproaching and upbraiding one another, but chiefly him who had first received it since he had not acted in accordance with their agreement. Finally they resolved to go in again and all have a hand in the killing. ,Fate, however, had decreed that Eetion's offspring should be the source of ills for Corinth, for Labda, standing close to this door, heard all this. Fearing that they would change their minds and that they would take and actually kill the child, she took it away and hid it where she thought it would be hardest to find, in a chest, for she knew that if they returned and set about searching they would seek in every place—which in fact they did. ,They came and searched, but when they did not find it, they resolved to go off and say to those who had sent them that they had carried out their orders. They then went away and said this. ,Eetion's son, however, grew up, and because of his escape from that danger, he was called Cypselus, after the chest. When he had reached manhood and was seeking a divination, an oracle of double meaning was given him at Delphi. Putting faith in this, he made an attempt on Corinth and won it. ,The oracle was as follows: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"That man is fortunate who steps into my house, /l l Cypselus, son of Eetion, the king of noble Corinth, /l lHe himself and his children, but not the sons of his sons. /l /quote Such was the oracle. Cypselus, however, when he had gained the tyranny, conducted himself in this way: many of the Corinthians he drove into exile, many he deprived of their wealth, and by far the most he had killed. ,After a reign of thirty years, he died in the height of prosperity, and was succeeded by his son Periander. Now Periander was to begin with milder than his father, but after he had held converse by messenger with Thrasybulus the tyrant of Miletus, he became much more bloodthirsty than Cypselus. ,He had sent a herald to Thrasybulus and inquired in what way he would best and most safely govern his city. Thrasybulus led the man who had come from Periander outside the town, and entered into a sown field. As he walked through the corn, continually asking why the messenger had come to him from Corinth, he kept cutting off all the tallest ears of wheat which he could see, and throwing them away, until he had destroyed the best and richest part of the crop. ,Then, after passing through the place and speaking no word of counsel, he sent the herald away. When the herald returned to Corinth, Periander desired to hear what counsel he brought, but the man said that Thrasybulus had given him none. The herald added that it was a strange man to whom he had been sent, a madman and a destroyer of his own possessions, telling Periander what he had seen Thrasybulus do. ,Periander, however, understood what had been done, and perceived that Thrasybulus had counselled him to slay those of his townsmen who were outstanding in influence or ability; with that he began to deal with his citizens in an evil manner. Whatever act of slaughter or banishment Cypselus had left undone, that Periander brought to accomplishment. In a single day he stripped all the women of Corinth naked, because of his own wife Melissa. ,Periander had sent messengers to the Oracle of the Dead on the river Acheron in Thesprotia to enquire concerning a deposit that a friend had left, but Melissa, in an apparition, said that she would tell him nothing, nor reveal where the deposit lay, for she was cold and naked. The garments, she said, with which Periander had buried with her had never been burnt, and were of no use to her. Then, as evidence for her husband that she spoke the truth, she added that Periander had put his loaves into a cold oven. ,When this message was brought back to Periander (for he had had intercourse with the dead body of Melissa and knew her token for true), immediately after the message he made a proclamation that all the Corinthian women should come out into the temple of Hera. They then came out as to a festival, wearing their most beautiful garments, and Periander set his guards there and stripped them all alike, ladies and serving-women, and heaped all the clothes in a pit, where, as he prayed to Melissa, he burnt them. ,When he had done this and sent a second message, the ghost of Melissa told him where the deposit of the friend had been laid. “This, then, Lacedaimonians, is the nature of tyranny, and such are its deeds. ,We Corinthians marvelled greatly when we saw that you were sending for Hippias, and now we marvel yet more at your words to us. We entreat you earnestly in the name of the gods of Hellas not to establish tyranny in the cities, but if you do not cease from so doing and unrighteously attempt to bring Hippias back, be assured that you are proceeding without the Corinthians' consent.” 7.142. This answer seemed to be and really was more merciful than the first, and the envoys, writing it down, departed for Athens. When the messengers had left Delphi and laid the oracle before the people, there was much inquiry concerning its meaning, and among the many opinions which were uttered, two contrary ones were especially worthy of note. Some of the elder men said that the gods answer signified that the acropolis should be saved, for in old time the acropolis of Athens had been fenced by a thorn hedge, ,which, by their interpretation, was the wooden wall. But others supposed that the god was referring to their ships, and they were for doing nothing but equipping these. Those who believed their ships to be the wooden wall were disabled by the two last verses of the oracle: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Divine Salamis, you will bring death to women's sons /l lWhen the corn is scattered, or the harvest gathered in. /l /quote ,These verses confounded the opinion of those who said that their ships were the wooden wall, for the readers of oracles took the verses to mean that they should offer battle by sea near Salamis and be there overthrown. 8.134. This man Mys is known to have gone to Lebadea and to have bribed a man of the country to go down into the cave of Trophonius and to have gone to the place of divination at Abae in Phocis. He went first to Thebes where he inquired of Ismenian Apollo (sacrifice is there the way of divination, as at Olympia), and moreover he bribed one who was no Theban but a stranger to lie down to sleep in the shrine of Amphiaraus. ,No Theban may seek a prophecy there, for Amphiaraus bade them by an oracle to choose which of the two they wanted and forgo the other, and take him either for their prophet or for their ally. They chose that he should be their ally. Therefore no Theban may lie down to sleep in that place.
10. Sophocles, Antigone, 1005-1011, 988-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 21 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Ennius, Varia, 18 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

13. Horace, Odes, 3.30.6-3.30.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

14. Ovid, Amores, 1.15.42 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 15.875-15.876 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.588-1.589, 2.590, 6.35, 6.103-6.123, 6.262-6.263, 6.321, 6.628 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.588. the bastioned gates; the uproar of the throng. 1.589. The Tyrians toil unwearied; some up-raise 2.590. The Greek besiegers to the roof-tops fled; 6.35. And Queen Pasiphae's brute-human son 6.103. In swift confusion! Sing thyself, I pray.” 6.104. So ceased his voice; the virgin through the cave 6.105. Scarce bridled yet by Phoebus' hand divine 6.106. Ecstatic swept along, and vainly stove 6.107. To fing its potent master from her breast; 6.108. But he more strongly plied his rein and curb 6.109. Upon her frenzied lips, and soon subdued 6.110. Her spirit fierce, and swayed her at his will. 6.111. Free and self-moved the cavern's hundred adoors 6.112. Swung open wide, and uttered to the air 6.113. The oracles the virgin-priestess sung : 6.114. “Thy long sea-perils thou hast safely passed; 6.115. But heavier woes await thee on the land. 6.116. Truly thy Trojans to Lavinian shore 6.117. Shall come—vex not thyself thereon—but, oh! 6.118. Shall rue their coming thither! war, red war! 6.119. And Tiber stained with bloody foam I see. 6.120. Simois, Xanthus, and the Dorian horde 6.121. Thou shalt behold; a new Achilles now 6.122. In Latium breathes,—he, too, of goddess born; 6.123. And Juno, burden of the sons of Troy 6.262. 0 heavenly mother!” So saying, his steps lie stayed 6.263. Close watching whither they should signal give; 6.321. The priestess sprinkled wine; 'twixt the two horns 6.628. Around him left and right the crowding shades
17. Silius Italicus, Punica, 13.466-13.487, 13.499-13.500, 13.504-13.505, 13.514-13.516, 13.615-13.649, 13.658-13.660, 13.663-13.665, 13.670, 13.699 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Statius, Achilleis, 1.611 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 6.14-6.15 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

20. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 7.21.12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.21.12. Before the sanctuary of Demeter is a spring. On the side of this towards the temple stands a wall of stones, while on the outer side has been made a descent to the spring. Here there is an infallible oracle, not indeed for everything, but only in the case of sick folk. They tie a mirror to a fine cord and let it down, judging the distance so that it does not sink deep into the spring, but just far enough to touch the water with its rim. Or, possibly “disk.” The round mirror might be lowered vertically or horizontally (face upwards). Then they pray to the goddess and burn incense, after which they look into the mirror, which shows them the patient either alive or dead.
21. Heraclitus Lesbius, Fragments, None



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, death/immortality and Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
aeneas Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301; Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
agamemnon Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301; Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
anachrony Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
analepsis, prolepsis Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
antikleia Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
aoroi Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
apollo, and the dead Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 98
apollo, homeric hymn Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
apollo, ismenios, oracle of Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 98
apollo Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
apostles, jesus Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
apotropaic Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
appius (claudius pulcher) Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
architectural remains, sanctuaries Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
aristophanes Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 208
artemis, at claros Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
artemis, homeric hymn Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
athena Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
bacchus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
cameron, alan Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
capitoline tablet Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
captatio (legacy hunting) Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 208
catoptromancy (mirror divination) Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 98
cerberus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
chorus, cf. choregia, choregos Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
circe Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 223; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 112
claros Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
clytemnestra Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
counterfactuals Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
daemonology Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 223, 224, 225, 226, 227
daimon Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
death and temporality, human desire for glory (kleos) in greco-roman literature Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
death and temporality, in homer Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
death and temporality Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
del rio, m. Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
delphi Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288; Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
delphic oracle Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
diotima Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
divination, the delphic oracle Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 266
divine intervention de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 112
doubleness, and counterfactuals Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
dynamis Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
elpenor Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
emotions, anger/rage de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 112
empyromancy, empura (fire divination) Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 98
ennius Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
enthusiastic prophecy Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 97, 98
euripides Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
falernus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
faraone, christopher Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
faustus, dr. Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 224
femininity Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
flattery Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 208
gender, and biological sex Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
goethe, j. w. von Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 224
hades/pluto Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
hades Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
harder, m. annette Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
hecate Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
hector Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
heidegger, martin Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 32
helen of troy Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
heracles Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
hermes Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
hicks, benjamin Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 208
historiography, and homer Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 32
homer, and historiography Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 32
homer, comparison of iliad with odyssey Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 32
homer, iliad, death/temporality in Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
homer, odyssey, death/immortality and Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
homer, on death and temporality Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
homer Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288; Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 32
honey, use of, in ritual Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 223
hydromancy (water divination) Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 98
iliad, and anachronism Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
immortality, human desire for glory (kleos) and Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
initiation Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
initiation and divination Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 97
jörgensens law de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 112
killing Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
lucian, on death and temporality Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
maecenas, positioning in horaces audience Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 208
magia naturalis Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
magic, kinds of Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
mana Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
marriage, sacred Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
masculinity Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
menelaus Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
milk, use of, in libations Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 223
narratee de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 112
narrative/narration passim, embedded de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 112
necromancy Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288; Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 97, 98; Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 223, 224, 225, 226, 227
nostos, as quest Folit-Weinberg, Homer, Parmenides, and the Road to Demonstration (2022) 295
odysseus, and parmenides to eon Folit-Weinberg, Homer, Parmenides, and the Road to Demonstration (2022) 295
odysseus, bed of Folit-Weinberg, Homer, Parmenides, and the Road to Demonstration (2022) 295
odysseus, death/temporality and Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
odysseus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301; Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 112
odyssey, temporality Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
ogden, d. Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
olympia, oracle and sanctuary of zeus at Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 98
oracles Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
paris (homeric character) Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
parmenides, and becoming like god Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 266
parmenides, and oracles Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 266
parmenides, his attitude to divine disclosure Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 266
parmenides, the proem Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 266
pausanias Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
penelope (wife of odysseus) Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
periander and his wife Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 97, 98
persephone Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
persona of horace, contrasted with protagonists of the satires Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 208
pirithoos Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
plato Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
pluto Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
poetic inspiration Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 266
polyphemus, cyclops de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 112
pomponia, mother of scipio africanus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
porta, g. della Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9
poseidon de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 112
prendergast, christopher Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
prolepsis Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
prophecy, tiresias Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
psuchopompos Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
psychagôgia Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
punic wars, second Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
pythia Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
satires (horace), literary influences on Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 208
scipio africanus, and achilles Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
scipio africanus, as son of jupiter Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
scipio africanus, imitatio of alexander the great by Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
scipio africanus, katabasis of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
scipio africanus, meeting with homer Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
sexuality, sexual intercourse Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
sibyl, deiphobe Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
sibyl Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301; Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
silius italicus, and ennius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
silius italicus, and homer Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
silius italicus, and lucretius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
silius italicus, and virgil Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
silius italicus, nekyia in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
socrates Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
teiresias Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301; Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49; Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212; Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
temporality, anachrony and prolepsis Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
temporality, and counterfactuals Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
theodicy Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 32
theseus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 288
time Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 49
tiresias, prophecy Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 324
tiresias Folit-Weinberg, Homer, Parmenides, and the Road to Demonstration (2022) 295; Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 98; Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 9, 223; Mowat, Engendering the Future: Divination and the Construction of Gender in the Late Roman Republic (2021) 82
to eon, and bed of odysseus Folit-Weinberg, Homer, Parmenides, and the Road to Demonstration (2022) 295
trophonius Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 97
ulysses, portrayal in satires Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire (2018) 208
underworld Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
vengeance Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212
venus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 301
votives' Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
wine, use of, in libations Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 223
zeus Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 212