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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6678
Homer, Odyssey, 1.415-1.416


οὔτε θεοπροπίης ἐμπάζομαι, ἥν τινα μήτηρnor attend to prophecy, whatever my mother may ask about when she calls a prophet to our hall. This stranger is of my father's family from Taphosand claims he's Mentes, son of wise Anchialus, and that he rules the oar-loving Taphians.”
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 12.228, 16.5 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

12.228. /come back over the selfsame road from th ships in disarray; for many of the Trojans shall we leave behind, whom th Achaeans shall slay with the bronze in defense of the ships. On this wise would a soothsayer interpret, one that in his mind had clear knowledge of omens, and to whom the folk gave ear. 16.5. /Thus then they were warring around the well-benched ship, but Patroclus drew nigh to Achilles, shepherd of the host, shedding hot tears, even as a fountain of dark water that down over the face of a beetling cliff poureth its dusky stream; 16.5. /and swift-footed goodly Achilles had pity when he saw him, and spake and addressed him with winged words:Why, Patroclus, art thou bathed in tears, like a girl, a mere babe, that runneth by her mother's side and biddeth her take her up, and clutcheth at her gown, and hindereth her in her going
2. Homer, Odyssey, 1.416, 15.160-15.178, 17.384-17.386 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 6 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Pindar, Paeanes, 4.52-4.53 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Herodotus, Histories, 7.91, 9.33-9.35, 9.92-9.94 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7.91. The Cilicians furnished a hundred ships. They also wore on their heads their native helmets, carried bucklers of raw oxhide for shields, and were clad in woollen tunics; each had two javelins and a sword very close in style to the knives of Egypt. These Cilicians were formerly called Hypachaei, and took their name from Cilix son of Agenor, a Phoenician. The Pamphylians furnished a hundred ships: they were armed like the Greeks. These Pamphylians are descended from the Trojans of the diaspora who followed Amphilochus and Calchas. 9.33. On the second day after they had all been arrayed according to their nations and their battalions, both armies offered sacrifice. It was Tisamenus who sacrificed for the Greeks, for he was with their army as a diviner; he was an Elean by birth, a Clytiad of the Iamid clan, and the Lacedaemonians gave him the freedom of their city. ,This they did, for when Tisamenus was inquiring of the oracle at Delphi concerning offspring, the priestess prophesied to him that he should win five great victories. Not understanding that oracle, he engaged in bodily exercise, thinking that he would then be able to win in similar sports. When he had trained himself for the Five Contests, he came within one wrestling bout of winning the Olympic prize, in a match with Hieronymus of Andros. ,The Lacedaemonians, however, perceived that the oracle given to Tisamenus spoke of the lists not of sport but of war, and they attempted to bribe Tisamenus to be a leader in their wars jointly with their kings of Heracles' line. ,When he saw that the Spartans set great store by his friendship, he set his price higher, and made it known to them that he would do what they wanted only in exchange for the gift of full citizenship and all of the citizen's rights. ,Hearing that, the Spartans at first were angry and completely abandoned their request; but when the dreadful menace of this Persian host hung over them, they consented and granted his demand. When he saw their purpose changed, he said that he would not be content with that alone; his brother Hegias too must be made a Spartan on the same terms as himself. 9.34. By so saying he imitated Melampus, in so far as one may compare demands for kingship with those for citizenship. For when the women of Argos had gone mad, and the Argives wanted him to come from Pylos and heal them of that madness, Melampus demanded half of their kingship for his wages. ,This the Argives would not put up with and departed. When, however, the madness spread among their women, they promised what Melampus demanded and were ready to give it to him. Thereupon, seeing their purpose changed, he demanded yet more and said that he would not do their will except if they gave a third of their kingship to his brother Bias; now driven into dire straits, the Argives consented to that also. 9.35. The Spartans too were so eagerly desirous of winning Tisamenus that they granted everything that he demanded. When they had granted him this also, Tisamenus of Elis, now a Spartan, engaged in divination for them and aided them to win five very great victories. No one on earth save Tisamenus and his brother ever became citizens of Sparta. ,Now the five victories were these: one, the first, this victory at Plataea; next, that which was won at Tegea over the Tegeans and Argives; after that, over all the Arcadians save the Mantineans at Dipaea; next, over the Messenians at Ithome; lastly, the victory at Tanagra over the Athenians and Argives, which was the last won of the five victories. 9.92. He said this and added deed to word. For straightway the Samians bound themselves by pledge and oath to alliance with the Greeks. ,This done, the rest sailed away, but Leutychides bade Hegesistratus to sail with the Greeks because of the good omen of his name. The Greeks waited through that day, and on the next they sought and received favorable augury; their diviner was Deiphonus son of Evenius, a man of that Apollonia which is in the Ionian gulf. This man's father Evenius had once fared as I will now relate. 9.93. There is at Apollonia a certain flock sacred to the Sun, which in the daytime is pastured beside the river Chon, which flows from the mountain called Lacmon through the lands of Apollonia and empties into the sea by the harbor of Oricum. By night, those townsmen who are most notable for wealth or lineage are chosen to watch it, each man serving for a year, for the people of Apollonia set great store by this flock, being so taught by a certain oracle. It is kept in a cave far distant from the town. ,Now at the time of which I speak, Evenius was the chosen watchman. But one night he fell asleep, and wolves, coming past his guard into the cave, killed about sixty of the flock. When Evenius was aware of it, he held his peace and told no man, intending to restore what was lost by buying others. ,This matter was not, however, hidden from the people of Apollonia, and when it came to their knowledge they brought him to judgment and condemned him to lose his eyesight for sleeping at his watch. So they blinded Evenius, but from the day of their so doing their flocks bore no offspring, nor did their land yield fruit as before. ,Furthermore, a declaration was given to them at Dodona and Delphi, when they inquired of the prophets what might be the cause of their present ill: the gods told them by their prophets that they had done unjustly in blinding Evenius, the guardian of the sacred flock, “for we ourselves” (they said) “sent those wolves, and we will not cease from avenging him until you make him such restitution for what you did as he himself chooses and approves; when that is fully done, we ourselves will give Evenius such a gift as will make many men consider him happy.” 9.94. This was the oracle given to the people of Apollonia. They kept it secret and charged certain of their townsmen to carry the business through; they acted as I will now show. Coming and sitting down by Evenius at the place where he sat, they spoke of other matters, till at last they fell to commiserating his misfortune. Guiding the conversation in this way, they asked him what compensation he would choose, if the people of Apollonia should promise to requite him for what they had done. ,He, knowing nothing of the oracle, said he would choose for a gift the lands of certain named townsmen whom he thought to have the two fairest estates in Apollonia, and a house besides which he knew to be the fairest in the town; let him (he said) have possession of these, and he would lay aside his anger, and be satisfied with that by way of restitution. ,So he said this, and those who were sitting beside him said in reply: “Evenius, the people of Apollonia hereby make you that restitution for the loss of your sight, obeying the oracle given to them.” At that he was very angry, for he learned through this the whole story and saw that they had cheated him. They did, however, buy from the possessors and give him what he had chosen, and from that day he had a natural gift of divination, through which he won fame.
6. Isaeus, Orations, 8.39 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Plato, Euthyphro, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4c. Naxos, he was working there on our land. Now he got drunk, got angry with one of our house slaves, and butchered him. So my father bound him hand and foot, threw him into a ditch, and sent a man here to Athens to ask the religious adviser what he ought
8. Plato, Ion, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

534c. as you do about Homer—but by a divine dispensation, each is able only to compose that to which the Muse has stirred him, this man dithyrambs, another laudatory odes, another dance-songs, another epic or else iambic verse; but each is at fault in any other kind. For not by art do they utter these things, but by divine influence; since, if they had fully learnt by art to speak on one kind of theme, they would know how to speak on all. And for this reason God takes away the mind of these men and uses them as his ministers, just as he does soothsayers and godly seers
9. Plato, Meno, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

99c. This is the means which statesmen employ for their direction of states, and they have nothing more to do with wisdom than soothsayers and diviners; for these people utter many a true thing when inspired, but have no knowledge of anything they say. Men. I daresay that is so. Soc. And may we, Meno, rightly call those men divine who, having no understanding, yet succeed in many a great deed and word? Men. Certainly. Soc. Then we shall be right in calling those divine of whom
10. Theophrastus, Characters, 16.6 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

11. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 3.11.5, 10.9.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.11.5. At the altar of Augustus they show a bronze statue of Agias. This Agias, they say, by divining for Lysander captured the Athenian fleet at Aegospotami with the exception of ten ships of war. 405 B.C. These made their escape to Cyprus ; all the rest the Lacedaemonians captured along with their crews. Agias was a son of Agelochus, a son of Tisamenus. 10.9.7. Opposite these are offerings of the Lacedaemonians from spoils of the Athenians: the Dioscuri, Zeus, Apollo, Artemis, and beside these Poseidon, Lysander, son of Aristocritus, represented as being crowned by Poseidon, Agias, soothsayer to Lysander on the occasion of his victory, and Hermon, who steered his flag-ship.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 171, 176
ainigma and ainittesthai derivatives Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 176
amphiaraus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 176
apollo Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
asclepius Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
chrêsmologos Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 171, 176
delphi Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
dillery, john Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 171, 176
divination, and authority Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 171, 176
divination, and patronage Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 171, 176
divination Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
healing magic Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
helen Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
herodotus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
homer Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227; Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 171, 176
iamus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
inspiration (see also divination, trance, and mania) Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 171
mania, family genealogies of Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 176
mania, poet as Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 176
mania Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 171, 176
medicine Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
melampus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 176
menelaus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
merkelbach Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 176
nilsson, martin p. Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 171
odysseus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
olympics Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
pindar Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227; Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 171
plato Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 171
prophetês Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 171
sparta Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
struck, peter t. Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 176
teiresias Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
telemachus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 176
tisamenos Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227
weather signs (see divination, and weather signs)' Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 176
zeus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 227