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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6677
Homer, Iliad, 9.185-9.191


Μυρμιδόνων δʼ ἐπί τε κλισίας καὶ νῆας ἱκέσθηνAnd they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors;


τὸν δʼ εὗρον φρένα τερπόμενον φόρμιγγι λιγείῃAnd they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors;


καλῇ δαιδαλέῃ, ἐπὶ δʼ ἀργύρεον ζυγὸν ἦενAnd they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors;


τὴν ἄρετʼ ἐξ ἐνάρων πόλιν Ἠετίωνος ὀλέσσας·And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors;


τῇ ὅ γε θυμὸν ἔτερπεν, ἄειδε δʼ ἄρα κλέα ἀνδρῶν.And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors;


Πάτροκλος δέ οἱ οἶος ἐναντίος ἧστο σιωπῇand Patroclus alone sat over against him in silence, waiting until Aeacus' son should cease from singing. But the twain came forward and goodly Odysseus led the way, and they took their stand before his face; and Achilles leapt up in amazement with the lyre in his hand, and left the seat whereon he sat;


δέγμενος Αἰακίδην ὁπότε λήξειεν ἀείδωνand Patroclus alone sat over against him in silence, waiting until Aeacus' son should cease from singing. But the twain came forward and goodly Odysseus led the way, and they took their stand before his face; and Achilles leapt up in amazement with the lyre in his hand, and left the seat whereon he sat;


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 101-103, 96-100 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

100. Employing gentle words persuasively
2. Homer, Iliad, 2.370-2.374, 3.44-3.51, 3.54-3.55, 9.186-9.191, 18.107-18.111, 24.376-24.377 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.370. / Aye verily once more, old sir, art thou pre-eminent in speech above the sons of the Achaeans. I would, O father Zeus and Athene and Apollo, that I had ten such counsellors; then would the city of king Priam forthwith bow her head, taken and laid waste beneath our hands. 2.371. / Aye verily once more, old sir, art thou pre-eminent in speech above the sons of the Achaeans. I would, O father Zeus and Athene and Apollo, that I had ten such counsellors; then would the city of king Priam forthwith bow her head, taken and laid waste beneath our hands. 2.372. / Aye verily once more, old sir, art thou pre-eminent in speech above the sons of the Achaeans. I would, O father Zeus and Athene and Apollo, that I had ten such counsellors; then would the city of king Priam forthwith bow her head, taken and laid waste beneath our hands. 2.373. / Aye verily once more, old sir, art thou pre-eminent in speech above the sons of the Achaeans. I would, O father Zeus and Athene and Apollo, that I had ten such counsellors; then would the city of king Priam forthwith bow her head, taken and laid waste beneath our hands. 2.374. / Aye verily once more, old sir, art thou pre-eminent in speech above the sons of the Achaeans. I would, O father Zeus and Athene and Apollo, that I had ten such counsellors; then would the city of king Priam forthwith bow her head, taken and laid waste beneath our hands. 3.44. /would that thou hadst ne'er been born and hadst died unwed. Aye, of that were I fain, and it had been better far than that thou shouldest thus be a reproach, and that men should look upon thee in scorn. Verily, methinks, will the long-haired Achaeans laugh aloud, deeming that a prince is our champion because a comely 3.45. /form is his, while there is no strength in his heart nor any valour. Was it in such strength as this that thou didst sail over the main in thy seafaring ships, when thou hadst gathered thy trusty comrades, and, coming to an alien folk, didst bring back a comely woman from a distant land, even a daughter of warriors who wield the spear 3.46. /form is his, while there is no strength in his heart nor any valour. Was it in such strength as this that thou didst sail over the main in thy seafaring ships, when thou hadst gathered thy trusty comrades, and, coming to an alien folk, didst bring back a comely woman from a distant land, even a daughter of warriors who wield the spear 3.47. /form is his, while there is no strength in his heart nor any valour. Was it in such strength as this that thou didst sail over the main in thy seafaring ships, when thou hadst gathered thy trusty comrades, and, coming to an alien folk, didst bring back a comely woman from a distant land, even a daughter of warriors who wield the spear 3.48. /form is his, while there is no strength in his heart nor any valour. Was it in such strength as this that thou didst sail over the main in thy seafaring ships, when thou hadst gathered thy trusty comrades, and, coming to an alien folk, didst bring back a comely woman from a distant land, even a daughter of warriors who wield the spear 3.49. /form is his, while there is no strength in his heart nor any valour. Was it in such strength as this that thou didst sail over the main in thy seafaring ships, when thou hadst gathered thy trusty comrades, and, coming to an alien folk, didst bring back a comely woman from a distant land, even a daughter of warriors who wield the spear 3.50. /but to thy father and city and all the people a grievous bane—to thy foes a joy, but to thine own self a hanging down of the head? Wilt thou indeed not abide Menelaus, dear to Ares? Thou wouldest learn what manner of warrior he is whose lovely wife thou hast. Then will thy lyre help thee not, neither the gifts of Aphrodite 3.51. /but to thy father and city and all the people a grievous bane—to thy foes a joy, but to thine own self a hanging down of the head? Wilt thou indeed not abide Menelaus, dear to Ares? Thou wouldest learn what manner of warrior he is whose lovely wife thou hast. Then will thy lyre help thee not, neither the gifts of Aphrodite 3.54. /but to thy father and city and all the people a grievous bane—to thy foes a joy, but to thine own self a hanging down of the head? Wilt thou indeed not abide Menelaus, dear to Ares? Thou wouldest learn what manner of warrior he is whose lovely wife thou hast. Then will thy lyre help thee not, neither the gifts of Aphrodite 3.55. /thy locks and thy comeliness, when thou shalt lie low in the dust. Nay, verily, the Trojans are utter cowards: else wouldest thou ere this have donned a coat of stone by reason of all the evil thou hast wrought. And to him did godlike Alexander make answer, saying:Hector, seeing that thou dost chide me duly, and not beyond what is due— 9.186. /And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.187. /And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.188. /And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.189. /And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.190. /and Patroclus alone sat over against him in silence, waiting until Aeacus' son should cease from singing. But the twain came forward and goodly Odysseus led the way, and they took their stand before his face; and Achilles leapt up in amazement with the lyre in his hand, and left the seat whereon he sat; 9.191. /and Patroclus alone sat over against him in silence, waiting until Aeacus' son should cease from singing. But the twain came forward and goodly Odysseus led the way, and they took their stand before his face; and Achilles leapt up in amazement with the lyre in his hand, and left the seat whereon he sat; 18.107. /I that in war am such as is none other of the brazen-coated Achaeans, albeit in council there be others better— so may strife perish from among gods and men, and anger that setteth a man on to grow wroth, how wise soever he be, and that sweeter far than trickling honey 18.108. /I that in war am such as is none other of the brazen-coated Achaeans, albeit in council there be others better— so may strife perish from among gods and men, and anger that setteth a man on to grow wroth, how wise soever he be, and that sweeter far than trickling honey 18.109. /I that in war am such as is none other of the brazen-coated Achaeans, albeit in council there be others better— so may strife perish from among gods and men, and anger that setteth a man on to grow wroth, how wise soever he be, and that sweeter far than trickling honey 18.110. /waxeth like smoke in the breasts of men; even as but now the king of men, Agamemnon, moved me to wrath. Howbeit these things will we let be as past and done, for all our pain, curbing the heart in our breasts, because we must. But now will I go forth that I may light on the slayer of the man I loved 18.111. /waxeth like smoke in the breasts of men; even as but now the king of men, Agamemnon, moved me to wrath. Howbeit these things will we let be as past and done, for all our pain, curbing the heart in our breasts, because we must. But now will I go forth that I may light on the slayer of the man I loved 24.376. /seeing he hath sent a way-farer such as thou to meet me, a bringer of blessing, so wondrous in form and comeliness, and withal thou art wise of heart; blessed parents are they from whom thou art sprung. Then again the messenger, Argeiphontes, spake to him:Yea verily, old sire, all this hast thou spoken according to right. 24.377. /seeing he hath sent a way-farer such as thou to meet me, a bringer of blessing, so wondrous in form and comeliness, and withal thou art wise of heart; blessed parents are they from whom thou art sprung. Then again the messenger, Argeiphontes, spake to him:Yea verily, old sire, all this hast thou spoken according to right.
3. Homer, Odyssey, 1.150-1.152, 1.159, 1.163-1.165, 1.325-1.326, 1.422, 4.221-4.226, 8.75-8.78, 9.8, 9.14-9.15, 14.463-14.466, 17.606, 18.304 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Helen, 1340-1345, 1339 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1339. θεοῖς βροτείῳ τε γένει
5. Euripides, Medea, 191-203, 190 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

190. Wert thou to call the men of old time rude uncultured boors thou wouldst not err, seeing that they devised their hymns for festive occasions, for banquets, and to grace the board, a pleasure to catch the ear, shed o’er our life
6. Plutarch, Dialogue On Love, 762 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, in homers iliad Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 82
achilles Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231
agamemnon Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 222, 223
allegory Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 231
ambrose, st Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 219
anger Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 225, 228, 229, 230, 231
antiphon Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 226, 227
autopsia Demoen and Praet, Theios Sophistes: Essays on Flavius Philostratus' Vita Apollonii (2009) 116
briseis Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 230
calypso Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 220
catullus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 228
christianity Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 219
circe Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 220
cyclops, the Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 227, 228
cyrus the great, and lyrody Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 82
demeter Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 225
demodocus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 220
diogenes of babylon Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 230
empedocles Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 225, 226
epicureanism Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 230, 231
eustathius Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 220, 221
hector, in homers iliad Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 82
heraclitus, homeric problems Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 223
hermes Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 227
herodotus Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 82
homer, iliad Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 82
homer, origins of philosophy in Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 223
honored by paeans, and singing Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 82
libanius Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 229
lyres/lyrody/citharas/citharists, and weakness Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 82
maximus of turin Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 219
medea in eur. med. Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 227
metafi ction/metanarrativity Demoen and Praet, Theios Sophistes: Essays on Flavius Philostratus' Vita Apollonii (2009) 116
muses Demoen and Praet, Theios Sophistes: Essays on Flavius Philostratus' Vita Apollonii (2009) 116
nestor Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 222, 223
odysseus Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 82; Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 219, 223, 224
patroclus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 220, 221
peripatetic thought Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 223
phemios Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 220
philodemus, on music Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 230, 231
philoxenus, cyclops Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 228, 231
phorminxes Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 82
pindar Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 224
plato Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 223
posidippus, seal Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 222
prayer Demoen and Praet, Theios Sophistes: Essays on Flavius Philostratus' Vita Apollonii (2009) 116
priam Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 223
pythagoreanism Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 229
sappho Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 228
seneca Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 223
sextus empiricus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 228, 229, 230, 231
sirens, the Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 219, 231
sophist' Demoen and Praet, Theios Sophistes: Essays on Flavius Philostratus' Vita Apollonii (2009) 116
stoicism Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 230
theocritus, idyll Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 228, 230
vase paintings, singing Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 82
weakness, association with lyrody Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 82