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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6677
Homer, Iliad, 6.357-6.358


οἷσιν ἐπὶ Ζεὺς θῆκε κακὸν μόρον, ὡς καὶ ὀπίσσωmy brother, since above all others has trouble encompassed thy heart because of shameless me, and the folly of Alexander; on whom Zeus hath brought an evil doom, that even in days to come we may be a song for men that are yet to be. Then made answer to her great Hector of the flashing helm:


ἀνθρώποισι πελώμεθʼ ἀοίδιμοι ἐσσομένοισι.my brother, since above all others has trouble encompassed thy heart because of shameless me, and the folly of Alexander; on whom Zeus hath brought an evil doom, that even in days to come we may be a song for men that are yet to be. Then made answer to her great Hector of the flashing helm:


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 3.121-3.122, 3.125-3.128, 3.139-3.140, 3.164-3.165, 3.173-3.180, 3.203-3.224, 3.232-3.233, 3.241-3.242, 6.344-6.356, 6.358, 9.412-9.416 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3.121. /and he failed not to hearken to goodly Agamemnon.But Iris went as a messenger to white-armed Helen, in the likeness of her husband's sister, the wife of Antenor's son, even her that lord Helicaon, Antenor's son, had to wife, Laodice, the comeliest of the daughters of Priam. 3.122. /and he failed not to hearken to goodly Agamemnon.But Iris went as a messenger to white-armed Helen, in the likeness of her husband's sister, the wife of Antenor's son, even her that lord Helicaon, Antenor's son, had to wife, Laodice, the comeliest of the daughters of Priam. 3.125. /She found Helen in the hall, where she was weaving a great purple web of double fold, and thereon was broidering many battles of the horse-taming Trojans and the brazen-coated Achaeans, that for her sake they had endured at the hands of Ares. Close to her side then came Iris, swift of foot, and spake to her, saying: 3.126. /She found Helen in the hall, where she was weaving a great purple web of double fold, and thereon was broidering many battles of the horse-taming Trojans and the brazen-coated Achaeans, that for her sake they had endured at the hands of Ares. Close to her side then came Iris, swift of foot, and spake to her, saying: 3.127. /She found Helen in the hall, where she was weaving a great purple web of double fold, and thereon was broidering many battles of the horse-taming Trojans and the brazen-coated Achaeans, that for her sake they had endured at the hands of Ares. Close to her side then came Iris, swift of foot, and spake to her, saying: 3.128. /She found Helen in the hall, where she was weaving a great purple web of double fold, and thereon was broidering many battles of the horse-taming Trojans and the brazen-coated Achaeans, that for her sake they had endured at the hands of Ares. Close to her side then came Iris, swift of foot, and spake to her, saying: 3.139. /and they lean upon their shields, and beside them their long spears are fixed. But Alexander and Menelaus, dear to Ares, will do battle with their long spears for thee; and whoso shall conquer, his dear wife shalt thou be called. So spake the goddess, and put into her heart sweet longing 3.140. /for her former lord and her city and parents; and straightway she veiled herself with shining linen, and went forth from her chamber, letting fall round tears, not alone, for with her followed two handmaids as well, Aethra, daughter of Pittheus, and ox-eyed Clymene; 3.164. /neither be left here to be a bane to us and to our children after us. So they said, but Priam spake, and called Helen to him:Come hither, dear child, and sit before me, that thou mayest see thy former lord and thy kinsfolk and thy people—thou art nowise to blame in my eyes; it is the gods, methinks, that are to blame 3.165. /who roused against me the tearful war of the Achaeans —and that thou mayest tell me who is this huge warrior, this man of Achaea so valiant and so tall. Verily there be others that are even taller by a head, but so comely a man have mine eyes never yet beheld 3.173. /neither one so royal: he is like unto one that is a king. And Helen, fair among women, answered him, saying:Revered art thou in mine eyes, dear father of my husband, and dread. Would that evil death had been my pleasure when I followed thy son hither, and left my bridal chamber and my kinfolk 3.174. /neither one so royal: he is like unto one that is a king. And Helen, fair among women, answered him, saying:Revered art thou in mine eyes, dear father of my husband, and dread. Would that evil death had been my pleasure when I followed thy son hither, and left my bridal chamber and my kinfolk 3.175. /and my daughter, well-beloved, and the lovely companions of my girlhood. But that was not to be; wherefore I pine away with weeping. Howbeit this will I tell thee, whereof thou dost ask and enquire. Yon man is the son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, that is both a noble king and a valiant spearman. 3.176. /and my daughter, well-beloved, and the lovely companions of my girlhood. But that was not to be; wherefore I pine away with weeping. Howbeit this will I tell thee, whereof thou dost ask and enquire. Yon man is the son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, that is both a noble king and a valiant spearman. 3.177. /and my daughter, well-beloved, and the lovely companions of my girlhood. But that was not to be; wherefore I pine away with weeping. Howbeit this will I tell thee, whereof thou dost ask and enquire. Yon man is the son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, that is both a noble king and a valiant spearman. 3.178. /and my daughter, well-beloved, and the lovely companions of my girlhood. But that was not to be; wherefore I pine away with weeping. Howbeit this will I tell thee, whereof thou dost ask and enquire. Yon man is the son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, that is both a noble king and a valiant spearman. 3.179. /and my daughter, well-beloved, and the lovely companions of my girlhood. But that was not to be; wherefore I pine away with weeping. Howbeit this will I tell thee, whereof thou dost ask and enquire. Yon man is the son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, that is both a noble king and a valiant spearman. 3.180. /And he was husband's brother to shameless me, as sure as ever such a one there was. So spake she, and the old man was seized with wonder, and said:Ah, happy son of Atreus, child of fortune, blest of heaven; now see I that youths of the Achaeans full many are made subject unto thee. Ere now have I journeyed to the land of Phrygia, rich in vines 3.203. / This again is Laertes' son, Odysseus of many wiles, that was reared in the land of Ithaca, rugged though it be, and he knoweth all manner of craft and cunning devices. Then to her again made answer Antenor, the wise:Lady, this verily is a true word that thou hast spoken 3.204. / This again is Laertes' son, Odysseus of many wiles, that was reared in the land of Ithaca, rugged though it be, and he knoweth all manner of craft and cunning devices. Then to her again made answer Antenor, the wise:Lady, this verily is a true word that thou hast spoken 3.205. /for erstwhile on a time goodly Odysseus came hither also on an embassy concerning thee, together with Menelaus, dear to Ares; and it was I that gave them entertainment and welcomed them in my halls, and came to know the form and stature of them both and their cunning devices. Now when they mingled with the Trojans, as they were gathered together 3.206. /for erstwhile on a time goodly Odysseus came hither also on an embassy concerning thee, together with Menelaus, dear to Ares; and it was I that gave them entertainment and welcomed them in my halls, and came to know the form and stature of them both and their cunning devices. Now when they mingled with the Trojans, as they were gathered together 3.207. /for erstwhile on a time goodly Odysseus came hither also on an embassy concerning thee, together with Menelaus, dear to Ares; and it was I that gave them entertainment and welcomed them in my halls, and came to know the form and stature of them both and their cunning devices. Now when they mingled with the Trojans, as they were gathered together 3.208. /for erstwhile on a time goodly Odysseus came hither also on an embassy concerning thee, together with Menelaus, dear to Ares; and it was I that gave them entertainment and welcomed them in my halls, and came to know the form and stature of them both and their cunning devices. Now when they mingled with the Trojans, as they were gathered together 3.209. /for erstwhile on a time goodly Odysseus came hither also on an embassy concerning thee, together with Menelaus, dear to Ares; and it was I that gave them entertainment and welcomed them in my halls, and came to know the form and stature of them both and their cunning devices. Now when they mingled with the Trojans, as they were gathered together 3.210. /when they stood Menelaus overtopped him with his broad shoulders; howbeit when the twain were seated Odysseus was the more royal. But when they began to weave the web of speech and of counsel in the presence of all, Menelaus in truth spake fluently, with few words, but very clearly, seeing he was not a man of lengthy speech 3.211. /when they stood Menelaus overtopped him with his broad shoulders; howbeit when the twain were seated Odysseus was the more royal. But when they began to weave the web of speech and of counsel in the presence of all, Menelaus in truth spake fluently, with few words, but very clearly, seeing he was not a man of lengthy speech 3.212. /when they stood Menelaus overtopped him with his broad shoulders; howbeit when the twain were seated Odysseus was the more royal. But when they began to weave the web of speech and of counsel in the presence of all, Menelaus in truth spake fluently, with few words, but very clearly, seeing he was not a man of lengthy speech 3.213. /when they stood Menelaus overtopped him with his broad shoulders; howbeit when the twain were seated Odysseus was the more royal. But when they began to weave the web of speech and of counsel in the presence of all, Menelaus in truth spake fluently, with few words, but very clearly, seeing he was not a man of lengthy speech 3.214. /when they stood Menelaus overtopped him with his broad shoulders; howbeit when the twain were seated Odysseus was the more royal. But when they began to weave the web of speech and of counsel in the presence of all, Menelaus in truth spake fluently, with few words, but very clearly, seeing he was not a man of lengthy speech 3.215. /nor of rambling, though verily in years he was the younger. But whenever Odysseus of many wiles arose, he would stand and look down with eyes fixed upon the ground, and his staff he would move neither backwards nor forwards, but would hold it stiff, in semblance like a man of no understanding; 3.216. /nor of rambling, though verily in years he was the younger. But whenever Odysseus of many wiles arose, he would stand and look down with eyes fixed upon the ground, and his staff he would move neither backwards nor forwards, but would hold it stiff, in semblance like a man of no understanding; 3.217. /nor of rambling, though verily in years he was the younger. But whenever Odysseus of many wiles arose, he would stand and look down with eyes fixed upon the ground, and his staff he would move neither backwards nor forwards, but would hold it stiff, in semblance like a man of no understanding; 3.218. /nor of rambling, though verily in years he was the younger. But whenever Odysseus of many wiles arose, he would stand and look down with eyes fixed upon the ground, and his staff he would move neither backwards nor forwards, but would hold it stiff, in semblance like a man of no understanding; 3.219. /nor of rambling, though verily in years he was the younger. But whenever Odysseus of many wiles arose, he would stand and look down with eyes fixed upon the ground, and his staff he would move neither backwards nor forwards, but would hold it stiff, in semblance like a man of no understanding; 3.220. /thou wouldest have deemed him a churlish man and naught but a fool. But whenso he uttered his great voice from his chest, and words like snowflakes on a winter's day, then could no mortal man beside vie with Odysseus; then did we not so marvel to behold Odysseus' aspect. 3.221. /thou wouldest have deemed him a churlish man and naught but a fool. But whenso he uttered his great voice from his chest, and words like snowflakes on a winter's day, then could no mortal man beside vie with Odysseus; then did we not so marvel to behold Odysseus' aspect. 3.222. /thou wouldest have deemed him a churlish man and naught but a fool. But whenso he uttered his great voice from his chest, and words like snowflakes on a winter's day, then could no mortal man beside vie with Odysseus; then did we not so marvel to behold Odysseus' aspect. 3.223. /thou wouldest have deemed him a churlish man and naught but a fool. But whenso he uttered his great voice from his chest, and words like snowflakes on a winter's day, then could no mortal man beside vie with Odysseus; then did we not so marvel to behold Odysseus' aspect. 3.224. /thou wouldest have deemed him a churlish man and naught but a fool. But whenso he uttered his great voice from his chest, and words like snowflakes on a winter's day, then could no mortal man beside vie with Odysseus; then did we not so marvel to behold Odysseus' aspect. 3.232. /And Idomeneus over against him standeth amid the Cretans even as a god, and about him are gathered the captains of the Cretans. Full often was Menelaus, dear to Ares, wont to entertain him in our house, whenever he came from Crete. And now all the rest of the bright-eyed Achaeans do I see 3.233. /And Idomeneus over against him standeth amid the Cretans even as a god, and about him are gathered the captains of the Cretans. Full often was Menelaus, dear to Ares, wont to entertain him in our house, whenever he came from Crete. And now all the rest of the bright-eyed Achaeans do I see 3.241. /or though they followed hither in their seafaring ships, they have now no heart to enter into the battle of warriors for fear of the words of shame and the many revilings that are mine. So said she; but they ere now were fast holden of the life-giving earth there in Lacedaemon, in their dear native land. 3.242. /or though they followed hither in their seafaring ships, they have now no heart to enter into the battle of warriors for fear of the words of shame and the many revilings that are mine. So said she; but they ere now were fast holden of the life-giving earth there in Lacedaemon, in their dear native land. 6.344. /But come now, tarry a while, let me don my harness of war; or go thy way, and I will follow; and methinks I shall overtake thee. So said he, and Hector of the flashing helm answered him not a word, but unto him spake Helen with gentle words:O Brother of me that am a dog, a contriver of mischief and abhorred of all 6.345. /I would that on the day when first my mother gave me birth an evil storm-wind had borne me away to some mountain or to the wave of the loud-resounding sea, where the wave might have swept me away or ever these things came to pass. Howbeit, seeing the gods thus ordained these ills 6.346. /I would that on the day when first my mother gave me birth an evil storm-wind had borne me away to some mountain or to the wave of the loud-resounding sea, where the wave might have swept me away or ever these things came to pass. Howbeit, seeing the gods thus ordained these ills 6.347. /I would that on the day when first my mother gave me birth an evil storm-wind had borne me away to some mountain or to the wave of the loud-resounding sea, where the wave might have swept me away or ever these things came to pass. Howbeit, seeing the gods thus ordained these ills 6.348. /I would that on the day when first my mother gave me birth an evil storm-wind had borne me away to some mountain or to the wave of the loud-resounding sea, where the wave might have swept me away or ever these things came to pass. Howbeit, seeing the gods thus ordained these ills 6.349. /I would that on the day when first my mother gave me birth an evil storm-wind had borne me away to some mountain or to the wave of the loud-resounding sea, where the wave might have swept me away or ever these things came to pass. Howbeit, seeing the gods thus ordained these ills 6.350. /would that I had been wife to a better man, that could feel the indignation of his fellows and their many revilings. But this man's understanding is not now stable, nor ever will be hereafter; thereof I deem that he will e'en reap the fruit. But come now, enter in, and sit thee upon this chair 6.351. /would that I had been wife to a better man, that could feel the indignation of his fellows and their many revilings. But this man's understanding is not now stable, nor ever will be hereafter; thereof I deem that he will e'en reap the fruit. But come now, enter in, and sit thee upon this chair 6.352. /would that I had been wife to a better man, that could feel the indignation of his fellows and their many revilings. But this man's understanding is not now stable, nor ever will be hereafter; thereof I deem that he will e'en reap the fruit. But come now, enter in, and sit thee upon this chair 6.353. /would that I had been wife to a better man, that could feel the indignation of his fellows and their many revilings. But this man's understanding is not now stable, nor ever will be hereafter; thereof I deem that he will e'en reap the fruit. But come now, enter in, and sit thee upon this chair 6.354. /would that I had been wife to a better man, that could feel the indignation of his fellows and their many revilings. But this man's understanding is not now stable, nor ever will be hereafter; thereof I deem that he will e'en reap the fruit. But come now, enter in, and sit thee upon this chair 6.355. /my brother, since above all others has trouble encompassed thy heart because of shameless me, and the folly of Alexander; on whom Zeus hath brought an evil doom, that even in days to come we may be a song for men that are yet to be. Then made answer to her great Hector of the flashing helm: 6.356. /my brother, since above all others has trouble encompassed thy heart because of shameless me, and the folly of Alexander; on whom Zeus hath brought an evil doom, that even in days to come we may be a song for men that are yet to be. Then made answer to her great Hector of the flashing helm: 6.358. /my brother, since above all others has trouble encompassed thy heart because of shameless me, and the folly of Alexander; on whom Zeus hath brought an evil doom, that even in days to come we may be a song for men that are yet to be. Then made answer to her great Hector of the flashing helm: 9.412. /For my mother the goddess, silver-footed Thetis, telleth me that twofold fates are bearing me toward the doom of death: if I abide here and war about the city of the Trojans, then lost is my home-return, but my renown shall be imperishable; but if I return home to my dear native land 9.413. /For my mother the goddess, silver-footed Thetis, telleth me that twofold fates are bearing me toward the doom of death: if I abide here and war about the city of the Trojans, then lost is my home-return, but my renown shall be imperishable; but if I return home to my dear native land 9.414. /For my mother the goddess, silver-footed Thetis, telleth me that twofold fates are bearing me toward the doom of death: if I abide here and war about the city of the Trojans, then lost is my home-return, but my renown shall be imperishable; but if I return home to my dear native land 9.415. /lost then is my glorious renown, yet shall my life long endure, neither shall the doom of death come soon upon me. 9.416. /lost then is my glorious renown, yet shall my life long endure, neither shall the doom of death come soon upon me.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 4.145, 8.579-8.580 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Homeric Hymns, To Aphrodite, 143 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

143. Put love into his heart. Then Anchises
4. Alcaeus, Fragments, 42 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

5. Alcaeus, Fragments, 42 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

6. Alcaeus Comicus, Fragments, 42 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Alcaeus Comicus, Fragments, 42 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1022, 1021 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1243-1245, 145-152, 356-367, 448-449, 1242 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Herodotus, Histories, 2.135 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.135. Rhodopis came to Egypt to work, brought by Xanthes of Samos, but upon her arrival was freed for a lot of money by Kharaxus of Mytilene, son of Scamandronymus and brother of Sappho the poetess. ,Thus Rhodopis lived as a free woman in Egypt, where, as she was very alluring, she acquired a lot of money—sufficient for such a Rhodopis, so to speak, but not for such a pyramid. ,Seeing that to this day anyone who likes can calculate what one tenth of her worth was, she cannot be credited with great wealth. For Rhodopis desired to leave a memorial of herself in Greece, by having something made which no one else had thought of or dedicated in a temple and presenting this at Delphi to preserve her memory; ,so she spent one tenth of her substance on the manufacture of a great number of iron beef spits, as many as the tenth would pay for, and sent them to Delphi ; these lie in a heap to this day, behind the altar set up by the Chians and in front of the shrine itself. ,The courtesans of Naucratis seem to be peculiarly alluring, for the woman of whom this story is told became so famous that every Greek knew the name of Rhodopis, and later on a certain Archidice was the theme of song throughout Greece, although less celebrated than the other. ,Kharaxus, after giving Rhodopis her freedom, returned to Mytilene . He is bitterly attacked by Sappho in one of her poems. This is enough about Rhodopis.
11. Anon., Sibylline Oracles, 3.419-3.432, 3.774 (1st cent. BCE - 5th cent. CE)

3.419. Shall leave Mæotis's lake, and there shall be 3.420. 420 Down the deep stream a fruitful, furrow's track 3.421. And the vast flow shall hold a neck of land. 3.422. And there are hollow chasms and yawning pits; 3.423. And many cities, men and all, shall fall:– 3.424. In Asia–Iassus, Cebren, Pandonia 3.425. 425 Colophon, Ephesus, Nicæa, Antioch 3.426. Syagra, Sinope, Smyrna, Myrina 3.427. Most happy Gaza, Hierapolis, . 3.428. Astypalaia; and in Europe–Tanagra 3.429. Clitor, Basilis, Meropeia, Antigone 3.430. 430 Magnessa, Mykene, Oiantheia. 3.431. Know then that the destructive race of Egypt 3.432. Is near destruction, and the past year then 3.774. Over the spacious surface of the sea.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 134; Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
action, taken by heroines Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
aesop Blondell and Ormand, Ancient Sex: New Essays (2015) 158
ambiguity, of emotions de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 55
anchises de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 55
andromache Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 60; Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 134
aphrodite de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 55
apotheosis Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
archedice Blondell and Ormand, Ancient Sex: New Essays (2015) 158
ariadne Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
as Blondell and Ormand, Ancient Sex: New Essays (2015) 158
aulis episode Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 134
brother Blondell and Ormand, Ancient Sex: New Essays (2015) 158
choice, by heroines Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
deianeira, name of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
dimock, g. Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
divine intervention de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 55
einodia Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
emotions, desire de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 55
epigrams Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198
female homoeroticism Blondell and Ormand, Ancient Sex: New Essays (2015) 158
fenik, b. Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 134
focalization de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 55
forgetting, dangers of Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 260
gender roles, as definitive of sexual behavior Blondell and Ormand, Ancient Sex: New Essays (2015) 158
hapax legomena (homeric) Beck, Repetition, Communication, and Meaning in the Ancient World (2021) 137
hector Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 134
hecuba Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 103
hekate Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
helen Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 134; Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198; Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 72; Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 153; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 55
helen of troy Blondell and Ormand, Ancient Sex: New Essays (2015) 158
hemithea Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
herakles Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
heroines, actions of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
heroines, and choice Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
heroines, choice by Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
heroines, kleos of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
heroines, names of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
homer, biographical tradition Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198
homer, reception of Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198
homer Beck, Repetition, Communication, and Meaning in the Ancient World (2021) 137
ino-leukothea, name of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
ino-leukothea Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
interlocutor role Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 103
iphigeneia, name of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
iris de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 55
jason Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 153
katz, μ. α. Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
kleos, of heroines Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
kleos Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198
kurke, leslie Blondell and Ormand, Ancient Sex: New Essays (2015) 158
lament Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 103
loraux, nicole Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 103
lyric i, construction of Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 72
medea Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56; Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 153
melikertes Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
menelaus Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 134
metapoetics Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198
molpadia Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
muses Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 79
music, commemoration in song Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 103
name of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
names, and apotheosis Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
names, and identity Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
names, of heroines Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
nostalgia de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 55
odysseus, name of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
orsiloche Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
pain/suffering de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 55
papadopoulou, thalia Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 103
paris Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 134; Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 72
poetry, troades on immortality in Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 79
prayer Beck, Repetition, Communication, and Meaning in the Ancient World (2021) 137
prophecy, and time Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 103
prophecy Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198
rhodopis Blondell and Ormand, Ancient Sex: New Essays (2015) 158
sacrifice, of polyxena, in hecuba Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 79
semele, name of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
sibyl Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198
sibylline oracles Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198
slavery, lament of trojan women in troades over Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 79
speech de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 55
tears de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 55
thyone Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 56
time, cassandras perception of Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 103
tradition Beck, Repetition, Communication, and Meaning in the Ancient World (2021) 137
tragedy Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 260
troades lament of enslaved trojan women in Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 79
troades on immortality in poetry Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 79
trojan war Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 134; Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 198; Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 72
trojan war in lyric Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 72
trojan women (euripides), hecubas anticipation of fame Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 103
trojan women (euripides), imagery Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 103
trojan women (euripides), response to cassandra Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 103
trojan women (euripides) Pillinger, Cassandra and the Poetics of Prophecy in Greek and Latin Literature (2019) 103
troy, the fall of Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 134
tukhe(chance) Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 79
war, trojan Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 153, 260
women in greek culture lament of enslaved trojan women in troades' Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 79
word Beck, Repetition, Communication, and Meaning in the Ancient World (2021) 137
zeus Beck, Repetition, Communication, and Meaning in the Ancient World (2021) 137; Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 134