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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6677
Homer, Iliad, 6.138-6.140


τῷ μὲν ἔπειτʼ ὀδύσαντο θεοὶ ῥεῖα ζώοντεςBut Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind;


καί μιν τυφλὸν ἔθηκε Κρόνου πάϊς· οὐδʼ ἄρʼ ἔτι δὴνBut Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind;


ἦν, ἐπεὶ ἀθανάτοισιν ἀπήχθετο πᾶσι θεοῖσιν·and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus:


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

27 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 4.30-4.37, 4.48-4.52, 5.330-5.340, 5.407-5.409, 5.846-5.863, 6.12, 6.55-6.65, 6.119-6.137, 6.139-6.236, 6.389, 9.497, 11.123-11.125, 11.138-11.140, 14.313-14.328, 18.109, 18.394-18.408, 20.300-20.308, 20.313-20.317, 21.441-21.460, 22.26-22.31, 22.460, 23.91-23.92, 24.49 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4.30. /Then, stirred to hot anger, spake to her Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Strange queen, wherein do Priam and the sons of Priam work thee ills so many, that thou ragest unceasingly to lay waste the well-built citadel of Ilios? If thou wert to enter within the gates and the high walls 4.31. /Then, stirred to hot anger, spake to her Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Strange queen, wherein do Priam and the sons of Priam work thee ills so many, that thou ragest unceasingly to lay waste the well-built citadel of Ilios? If thou wert to enter within the gates and the high walls 4.32. /Then, stirred to hot anger, spake to her Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Strange queen, wherein do Priam and the sons of Priam work thee ills so many, that thou ragest unceasingly to lay waste the well-built citadel of Ilios? If thou wert to enter within the gates and the high walls 4.33. /Then, stirred to hot anger, spake to her Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Strange queen, wherein do Priam and the sons of Priam work thee ills so many, that thou ragest unceasingly to lay waste the well-built citadel of Ilios? If thou wert to enter within the gates and the high walls 4.34. /Then, stirred to hot anger, spake to her Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Strange queen, wherein do Priam and the sons of Priam work thee ills so many, that thou ragest unceasingly to lay waste the well-built citadel of Ilios? If thou wert to enter within the gates and the high walls 4.35. /and to devour Priam raw and the sons of Priam and all the Trojans besides, then perchance mightest thou heal thine anger. Do as thy pleasure is; let not this quarrel in time to come be to thee and me a grievous cause of strife between us twain. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart. 4.36. /and to devour Priam raw and the sons of Priam and all the Trojans besides, then perchance mightest thou heal thine anger. Do as thy pleasure is; let not this quarrel in time to come be to thee and me a grievous cause of strife between us twain. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart. 4.37. /and to devour Priam raw and the sons of Priam and all the Trojans besides, then perchance mightest thou heal thine anger. Do as thy pleasure is; let not this quarrel in time to come be to thee and me a grievous cause of strife between us twain. And another thing will I tell thee, and do thou lay it to heart. 4.48. /wherein men that dwell upon the face of the earth have their abodes, of these sacred Ilios was most honoured of my heart, and Priam and the people of Priam, with goodly spear of ash. For never at any time was mine altar in lack of the equal feast, the drink-offering, and the savour of burnt-offering, even the worship that is our due. 4.49. /wherein men that dwell upon the face of the earth have their abodes, of these sacred Ilios was most honoured of my heart, and Priam and the people of Priam, with goodly spear of ash. For never at any time was mine altar in lack of the equal feast, the drink-offering, and the savour of burnt-offering, even the worship that is our due. 4.50. /Then in answer to him spake ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Verily have I three cities that are far dearest in my sight, Argos and Sparta and broad-wayed Mycenae; these do thou lay waste whensoe'er they shall be hateful to thy heart. Not in their defence do I stand forth, nor account them too greatly. 4.51. /Then in answer to him spake ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Verily have I three cities that are far dearest in my sight, Argos and Sparta and broad-wayed Mycenae; these do thou lay waste whensoe'er they shall be hateful to thy heart. Not in their defence do I stand forth, nor account them too greatly. 4.52. /Then in answer to him spake ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Verily have I three cities that are far dearest in my sight, Argos and Sparta and broad-wayed Mycenae; these do thou lay waste whensoe'er they shall be hateful to thy heart. Not in their defence do I stand forth, nor account them too greatly. 5.330. /He the while had gone in pursuit of Cypris with his pitiless bronze, discerning that she was a weakling goddess, and not one of those that lord it in the battle of warriors,—no Athene she, nor Enyo, sacker of cities. But when he had come upon her as he pursued her through the great throng 5.331. /He the while had gone in pursuit of Cypris with his pitiless bronze, discerning that she was a weakling goddess, and not one of those that lord it in the battle of warriors,—no Athene she, nor Enyo, sacker of cities. But when he had come upon her as he pursued her through the great throng 5.332. /He the while had gone in pursuit of Cypris with his pitiless bronze, discerning that she was a weakling goddess, and not one of those that lord it in the battle of warriors,—no Athene she, nor Enyo, sacker of cities. But when he had come upon her as he pursued her through the great throng 5.333. /He the while had gone in pursuit of Cypris with his pitiless bronze, discerning that she was a weakling goddess, and not one of those that lord it in the battle of warriors,—no Athene she, nor Enyo, sacker of cities. But when he had come upon her as he pursued her through the great throng 5.334. /He the while had gone in pursuit of Cypris with his pitiless bronze, discerning that she was a weakling goddess, and not one of those that lord it in the battle of warriors,—no Athene she, nor Enyo, sacker of cities. But when he had come upon her as he pursued her through the great throng 5.335. /then the son of great-souled Tydeus thrust with his sharp spear and leapt upon her, and wounded the surface of her delicate hand, and forthwith through the ambrosial raiment that the Graces themselves had wrought for her the spear pierced the flesh upon the wrist above the palm and forth flowed the immortal blood of the goddess 5.336. /then the son of great-souled Tydeus thrust with his sharp spear and leapt upon her, and wounded the surface of her delicate hand, and forthwith through the ambrosial raiment that the Graces themselves had wrought for her the spear pierced the flesh upon the wrist above the palm and forth flowed the immortal blood of the goddess 5.337. /then the son of great-souled Tydeus thrust with his sharp spear and leapt upon her, and wounded the surface of her delicate hand, and forthwith through the ambrosial raiment that the Graces themselves had wrought for her the spear pierced the flesh upon the wrist above the palm and forth flowed the immortal blood of the goddess 5.338. /then the son of great-souled Tydeus thrust with his sharp spear and leapt upon her, and wounded the surface of her delicate hand, and forthwith through the ambrosial raiment that the Graces themselves had wrought for her the spear pierced the flesh upon the wrist above the palm and forth flowed the immortal blood of the goddess 5.339. /then the son of great-souled Tydeus thrust with his sharp spear and leapt upon her, and wounded the surface of her delicate hand, and forthwith through the ambrosial raiment that the Graces themselves had wrought for her the spear pierced the flesh upon the wrist above the palm and forth flowed the immortal blood of the goddess 5.340. /the ichor, such as floweth in the blessed gods; for they eat not bread neither drink flaming wine, wherefore they are bloodless, and are called immortals. She then with a loud cry let fall her son, and Phoebus Apollo took him in his arms 5.407. /And upon thee has the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, set this man—fool that he is; for the heart of Tydeus' son knoweth not this, that verily he endureth not for long who fighteth with the immortals, nor do his children prattle about his knees when he is come back from war and the dread conflict. 5.408. /And upon thee has the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, set this man—fool that he is; for the heart of Tydeus' son knoweth not this, that verily he endureth not for long who fighteth with the immortals, nor do his children prattle about his knees when he is come back from war and the dread conflict. 5.409. /And upon thee has the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, set this man—fool that he is; for the heart of Tydeus' son knoweth not this, that verily he endureth not for long who fighteth with the immortals, nor do his children prattle about his knees when he is come back from war and the dread conflict. 5.846. /put on the cap of Hades, to the end that mighty Ares should not see her.Now when Ares, the bane of mortals, was ware of goodly Diomedes, he let be huge Periphas to lie where he was, even where at the first he had slain him and taken away his life but made straight for Diomedes, tamer of horses. 5.847. /put on the cap of Hades, to the end that mighty Ares should not see her.Now when Ares, the bane of mortals, was ware of goodly Diomedes, he let be huge Periphas to lie where he was, even where at the first he had slain him and taken away his life but made straight for Diomedes, tamer of horses. 5.848. /put on the cap of Hades, to the end that mighty Ares should not see her.Now when Ares, the bane of mortals, was ware of goodly Diomedes, he let be huge Periphas to lie where he was, even where at the first he had slain him and taken away his life but made straight for Diomedes, tamer of horses. 5.849. /put on the cap of Hades, to the end that mighty Ares should not see her.Now when Ares, the bane of mortals, was ware of goodly Diomedes, he let be huge Periphas to lie where he was, even where at the first he had slain him and taken away his life but made straight for Diomedes, tamer of horses. 5.850. /And when they were now come near as they advanced one against the other, Ares first let drive over the yoke and the reins of the horses with his spear of bronze, eager to take away the other's life; but the spear the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, caught in her hand and thrust above the car to fly its way in vain. 5.851. /And when they were now come near as they advanced one against the other, Ares first let drive over the yoke and the reins of the horses with his spear of bronze, eager to take away the other's life; but the spear the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, caught in her hand and thrust above the car to fly its way in vain. 5.852. /And when they were now come near as they advanced one against the other, Ares first let drive over the yoke and the reins of the horses with his spear of bronze, eager to take away the other's life; but the spear the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, caught in her hand and thrust above the car to fly its way in vain. 5.853. /And when they were now come near as they advanced one against the other, Ares first let drive over the yoke and the reins of the horses with his spear of bronze, eager to take away the other's life; but the spear the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, caught in her hand and thrust above the car to fly its way in vain. 5.854. /And when they were now come near as they advanced one against the other, Ares first let drive over the yoke and the reins of the horses with his spear of bronze, eager to take away the other's life; but the spear the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, caught in her hand and thrust above the car to fly its way in vain. 5.855. /Next Diomedes, good at the war-cry, drave at Ares with his spear of bronze, and Pallas Athene sped it mightily against his nethermost belly, where he was girded with his taslets. There did he thrust and smite him, rending the fair flesh, and forth he drew the spear again. Then brazen Ares bellowed 5.856. /Next Diomedes, good at the war-cry, drave at Ares with his spear of bronze, and Pallas Athene sped it mightily against his nethermost belly, where he was girded with his taslets. There did he thrust and smite him, rending the fair flesh, and forth he drew the spear again. Then brazen Ares bellowed 5.857. /Next Diomedes, good at the war-cry, drave at Ares with his spear of bronze, and Pallas Athene sped it mightily against his nethermost belly, where he was girded with his taslets. There did he thrust and smite him, rending the fair flesh, and forth he drew the spear again. Then brazen Ares bellowed 5.858. /Next Diomedes, good at the war-cry, drave at Ares with his spear of bronze, and Pallas Athene sped it mightily against his nethermost belly, where he was girded with his taslets. There did he thrust and smite him, rending the fair flesh, and forth he drew the spear again. Then brazen Ares bellowed 5.859. /Next Diomedes, good at the war-cry, drave at Ares with his spear of bronze, and Pallas Athene sped it mightily against his nethermost belly, where he was girded with his taslets. There did he thrust and smite him, rending the fair flesh, and forth he drew the spear again. Then brazen Ares bellowed 5.860. /loud as nine thousand warriors or ten thousand cry in battle, when they join in the strife of the War-god; and thereat trembling came upon Achaeans alike and Trojans, and fear gat hold of them; so mightily bellowed Ares insatiate of war. 5.861. /loud as nine thousand warriors or ten thousand cry in battle, when they join in the strife of the War-god; and thereat trembling came upon Achaeans alike and Trojans, and fear gat hold of them; so mightily bellowed Ares insatiate of war. 5.862. /loud as nine thousand warriors or ten thousand cry in battle, when they join in the strife of the War-god; and thereat trembling came upon Achaeans alike and Trojans, and fear gat hold of them; so mightily bellowed Ares insatiate of war. 5.863. /loud as nine thousand warriors or ten thousand cry in battle, when they join in the strife of the War-god; and thereat trembling came upon Achaeans alike and Trojans, and fear gat hold of them; so mightily bellowed Ares insatiate of war. 6.12. /and drave the spear into his forehead so that the point of bronze pierced within the bone; and darkness enfolded his eyes.And Diomedes, good at the war-cry, slew Axylus, Teuthras' son, that dwelt in well-built Arisbe, a man rich in substance, that was beloved of all men; 6.55. / Soft-hearted Menelaus, why carest thou thus for the men? Hath then so great kindness been done thee in thy house by Trojans? of them let not one escape sheer destruction and the might of our hands, nay, not the man-child whom his mother bears in her womb; let not even him escape 6.56. / Soft-hearted Menelaus, why carest thou thus for the men? Hath then so great kindness been done thee in thy house by Trojans? of them let not one escape sheer destruction and the might of our hands, nay, not the man-child whom his mother bears in her womb; let not even him escape 6.57. / Soft-hearted Menelaus, why carest thou thus for the men? Hath then so great kindness been done thee in thy house by Trojans? of them let not one escape sheer destruction and the might of our hands, nay, not the man-child whom his mother bears in her womb; let not even him escape 6.58. / Soft-hearted Menelaus, why carest thou thus for the men? Hath then so great kindness been done thee in thy house by Trojans? of them let not one escape sheer destruction and the might of our hands, nay, not the man-child whom his mother bears in her womb; let not even him escape 6.59. / Soft-hearted Menelaus, why carest thou thus for the men? Hath then so great kindness been done thee in thy house by Trojans? of them let not one escape sheer destruction and the might of our hands, nay, not the man-child whom his mother bears in her womb; let not even him escape 6.60. /but let all perish together out of Ilios, unmourned and unmarked. So spake the warrior, and turned his brother's mind, for he counselled aright; so Menelaus with his hand thrust from him the warrior Adrastus, and lord Agamemnon smote him on the flank, and he fell backward; and the son of Atreus 6.61. /but let all perish together out of Ilios, unmourned and unmarked. So spake the warrior, and turned his brother's mind, for he counselled aright; so Menelaus with his hand thrust from him the warrior Adrastus, and lord Agamemnon smote him on the flank, and he fell backward; and the son of Atreus 6.62. /but let all perish together out of Ilios, unmourned and unmarked. So spake the warrior, and turned his brother's mind, for he counselled aright; so Menelaus with his hand thrust from him the warrior Adrastus, and lord Agamemnon smote him on the flank, and he fell backward; and the son of Atreus 6.63. /but let all perish together out of Ilios, unmourned and unmarked. So spake the warrior, and turned his brother's mind, for he counselled aright; so Menelaus with his hand thrust from him the warrior Adrastus, and lord Agamemnon smote him on the flank, and he fell backward; and the son of Atreus 6.64. /but let all perish together out of Ilios, unmourned and unmarked. So spake the warrior, and turned his brother's mind, for he counselled aright; so Menelaus with his hand thrust from him the warrior Adrastus, and lord Agamemnon smote him on the flank, and he fell backward; and the son of Atreus 6.65. /planted his heel on his chest, and drew forth the ashen spear. Then Nestor shouted aloud, and called to the Argives:My friends, Danaan warriors, squires of Ares, let no man now abide behind in eager desire for spoil, that he may come to the ships bearing the greatest store; 6.119. /to make prayer to the gods, and promise them hecatombs. So saying, Hector of the flashing helm departed, and the black hide at either end smote against his ankles and his neck, even the rim that ran about the outermost edge of his bossed shield.But Glaucus, son of Hippolochus, and the son of Tydeus 6.120. /came together in the space between the two hosts, eager to do battle. And when the twain were now come near as they advanced one against the other, Diomedes, good at the war-cry, was first to speak, saying:Who art thou, mighty one, among mortal men? For never have I seen thee in battle where men win glory 6.121. /came together in the space between the two hosts, eager to do battle. And when the twain were now come near as they advanced one against the other, Diomedes, good at the war-cry, was first to speak, saying:Who art thou, mighty one, among mortal men? For never have I seen thee in battle where men win glory 6.122. /came together in the space between the two hosts, eager to do battle. And when the twain were now come near as they advanced one against the other, Diomedes, good at the war-cry, was first to speak, saying:Who art thou, mighty one, among mortal men? For never have I seen thee in battle where men win glory 6.123. /came together in the space between the two hosts, eager to do battle. And when the twain were now come near as they advanced one against the other, Diomedes, good at the war-cry, was first to speak, saying:Who art thou, mighty one, among mortal men? For never have I seen thee in battle where men win glory 6.124. /came together in the space between the two hosts, eager to do battle. And when the twain were now come near as they advanced one against the other, Diomedes, good at the war-cry, was first to speak, saying:Who art thou, mighty one, among mortal men? For never have I seen thee in battle where men win glory 6.125. /until this day, but now hast thou come forth far in advance of all in thy hardihood, in that thou abidest my far-shadowing spear. Unhappy are they whose children face my might. But and if thou art one of the immortals come down from heaven, then will I not fight with the heavenly gods. 6.126. /until this day, but now hast thou come forth far in advance of all in thy hardihood, in that thou abidest my far-shadowing spear. Unhappy are they whose children face my might. But and if thou art one of the immortals come down from heaven, then will I not fight with the heavenly gods. 6.127. /until this day, but now hast thou come forth far in advance of all in thy hardihood, in that thou abidest my far-shadowing spear. Unhappy are they whose children face my might. But and if thou art one of the immortals come down from heaven, then will I not fight with the heavenly gods. 6.128. /until this day, but now hast thou come forth far in advance of all in thy hardihood, in that thou abidest my far-shadowing spear. Unhappy are they whose children face my might. But and if thou art one of the immortals come down from heaven, then will I not fight with the heavenly gods. 6.129. /until this day, but now hast thou come forth far in advance of all in thy hardihood, in that thou abidest my far-shadowing spear. Unhappy are they whose children face my might. But and if thou art one of the immortals come down from heaven, then will I not fight with the heavenly gods. 6.130. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.131. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.132. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.133. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.134. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.135. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.136. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.137. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.139. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.140. /and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus: 6.141. /and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus: 6.142. /and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus: 6.143. /and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus: 6.144. /and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus: 6.145. / Great-souled son of Tydeus, wherefore inquirest thou of my lineage? Even as are the generations of leaves, such are those also of men. As for the leaves, the wind scattereth some upon the earth, but the forest, as it bourgeons, putteth forth others when the season of spring is come; even so of men one generation springeth up and another passeth away. 6.146. / Great-souled son of Tydeus, wherefore inquirest thou of my lineage? Even as are the generations of leaves, such are those also of men. As for the leaves, the wind scattereth some upon the earth, but the forest, as it bourgeons, putteth forth others when the season of spring is come; even so of men one generation springeth up and another passeth away. 6.147. / Great-souled son of Tydeus, wherefore inquirest thou of my lineage? Even as are the generations of leaves, such are those also of men. As for the leaves, the wind scattereth some upon the earth, but the forest, as it bourgeons, putteth forth others when the season of spring is come; even so of men one generation springeth up and another passeth away. 6.148. / Great-souled son of Tydeus, wherefore inquirest thou of my lineage? Even as are the generations of leaves, such are those also of men. As for the leaves, the wind scattereth some upon the earth, but the forest, as it bourgeons, putteth forth others when the season of spring is come; even so of men one generation springeth up and another passeth away. 6.149. / Great-souled son of Tydeus, wherefore inquirest thou of my lineage? Even as are the generations of leaves, such are those also of men. As for the leaves, the wind scattereth some upon the earth, but the forest, as it bourgeons, putteth forth others when the season of spring is come; even so of men one generation springeth up and another passeth away. 6.150. /Howbeit, if thou wilt, hear this also, that thou mayest know well my lineage; and many there be that know it. There is a city Ephyre in the heart of Argos, pasture-land of horses, and there dwelt Sisyphus that was craftiest of men, Sisyphus, son of Aeolus; and he begat a son Glaucus; 6.151. /Howbeit, if thou wilt, hear this also, that thou mayest know well my lineage; and many there be that know it. There is a city Ephyre in the heart of Argos, pasture-land of horses, and there dwelt Sisyphus that was craftiest of men, Sisyphus, son of Aeolus; and he begat a son Glaucus; 6.152. /Howbeit, if thou wilt, hear this also, that thou mayest know well my lineage; and many there be that know it. There is a city Ephyre in the heart of Argos, pasture-land of horses, and there dwelt Sisyphus that was craftiest of men, Sisyphus, son of Aeolus; and he begat a son Glaucus; 6.153. /Howbeit, if thou wilt, hear this also, that thou mayest know well my lineage; and many there be that know it. There is a city Ephyre in the heart of Argos, pasture-land of horses, and there dwelt Sisyphus that was craftiest of men, Sisyphus, son of Aeolus; and he begat a son Glaucus; 6.154. /Howbeit, if thou wilt, hear this also, that thou mayest know well my lineage; and many there be that know it. There is a city Ephyre in the heart of Argos, pasture-land of horses, and there dwelt Sisyphus that was craftiest of men, Sisyphus, son of Aeolus; and he begat a son Glaucus; 6.155. /and Glaucus begat peerless Bellerophon. 6.156. /and Glaucus begat peerless Bellerophon. 6.157. /and Glaucus begat peerless Bellerophon. 6.158. /and Glaucus begat peerless Bellerophon. 6.159. /and Glaucus begat peerless Bellerophon. To him the gods granted beauty and lovely manliness; but Proetus in his heart devised against him evil, and drave him, seeing he was mightier far, from the land of the Argives; for Zeus had made them subject to his sceptre. 6.160. /Now the wife of Proetus, fair Anteia, lusted madly for Bellerophon, to lie with him in secret love, but could in no wise prevail upon wise-hearted Bellerophon, for that his heart was upright. So she made a tale of lies, and spake to king Proetus:Either die thyself, Proetus, or slay Bellerophon 6.161. /Now the wife of Proetus, fair Anteia, lusted madly for Bellerophon, to lie with him in secret love, but could in no wise prevail upon wise-hearted Bellerophon, for that his heart was upright. So she made a tale of lies, and spake to king Proetus:Either die thyself, Proetus, or slay Bellerophon 6.162. /Now the wife of Proetus, fair Anteia, lusted madly for Bellerophon, to lie with him in secret love, but could in no wise prevail upon wise-hearted Bellerophon, for that his heart was upright. So she made a tale of lies, and spake to king Proetus:Either die thyself, Proetus, or slay Bellerophon 6.163. /Now the wife of Proetus, fair Anteia, lusted madly for Bellerophon, to lie with him in secret love, but could in no wise prevail upon wise-hearted Bellerophon, for that his heart was upright. So she made a tale of lies, and spake to king Proetus:Either die thyself, Proetus, or slay Bellerophon 6.164. /Now the wife of Proetus, fair Anteia, lusted madly for Bellerophon, to lie with him in secret love, but could in no wise prevail upon wise-hearted Bellerophon, for that his heart was upright. So she made a tale of lies, and spake to king Proetus:Either die thyself, Proetus, or slay Bellerophon 6.165. /seeing he was minded to lie with me in love against my will. So she spake, and wrath gat hold upon the king to hear that word. To slay him he forbare, for his soul had awe of that; but he sent him to Lycia, and gave him baneful tokens, graving in a folded tablet many signs and deadly 6.166. /seeing he was minded to lie with me in love against my will. So she spake, and wrath gat hold upon the king to hear that word. To slay him he forbare, for his soul had awe of that; but he sent him to Lycia, and gave him baneful tokens, graving in a folded tablet many signs and deadly 6.167. /seeing he was minded to lie with me in love against my will. So she spake, and wrath gat hold upon the king to hear that word. To slay him he forbare, for his soul had awe of that; but he sent him to Lycia, and gave him baneful tokens, graving in a folded tablet many signs and deadly 6.168. /seeing he was minded to lie with me in love against my will. So she spake, and wrath gat hold upon the king to hear that word. To slay him he forbare, for his soul had awe of that; but he sent him to Lycia, and gave him baneful tokens, graving in a folded tablet many signs and deadly 6.169. /seeing he was minded to lie with me in love against my will. So she spake, and wrath gat hold upon the king to hear that word. To slay him he forbare, for his soul had awe of that; but he sent him to Lycia, and gave him baneful tokens, graving in a folded tablet many signs and deadly 6.170. /and bade him show these to his own wife's father, that he might be slain. So he went his way to Lycia under the blameless escort of the gods. And when he was come to Lycia and the stream of Xanthus, then with a ready heart did the king of wide Lycia do him honour: for nine days' space he shewed him entertainment, and slew nine oxen. Howbeit when the tenth rosy-fingered Dawn appeared 6.171. /and bade him show these to his own wife's father, that he might be slain. So he went his way to Lycia under the blameless escort of the gods. And when he was come to Lycia and the stream of Xanthus, then with a ready heart did the king of wide Lycia do him honour: for nine days' space he shewed him entertainment, and slew nine oxen. Howbeit when the tenth rosy-fingered Dawn appeared 6.172. /and bade him show these to his own wife's father, that he might be slain. So he went his way to Lycia under the blameless escort of the gods. And when he was come to Lycia and the stream of Xanthus, then with a ready heart did the king of wide Lycia do him honour: for nine days' space he shewed him entertainment, and slew nine oxen. Howbeit when the tenth rosy-fingered Dawn appeared 6.173. /and bade him show these to his own wife's father, that he might be slain. So he went his way to Lycia under the blameless escort of the gods. And when he was come to Lycia and the stream of Xanthus, then with a ready heart did the king of wide Lycia do him honour: for nine days' space he shewed him entertainment, and slew nine oxen. Howbeit when the tenth rosy-fingered Dawn appeared 6.174. /and bade him show these to his own wife's father, that he might be slain. So he went his way to Lycia under the blameless escort of the gods. And when he was come to Lycia and the stream of Xanthus, then with a ready heart did the king of wide Lycia do him honour: for nine days' space he shewed him entertainment, and slew nine oxen. Howbeit when the tenth rosy-fingered Dawn appeared 6.175. /then at length he questioned him and asked to see whatever token he bare from his daughter's husband, Proetus. But when he had received from him the evil token of his daughter's husband, first he bade him slay the raging Chimaera. 6.176. /then at length he questioned him and asked to see whatever token he bare from his daughter's husband, Proetus. But when he had received from him the evil token of his daughter's husband, first he bade him slay the raging Chimaera. 6.177. /then at length he questioned him and asked to see whatever token he bare from his daughter's husband, Proetus. But when he had received from him the evil token of his daughter's husband, first he bade him slay the raging Chimaera. 6.178. /then at length he questioned him and asked to see whatever token he bare from his daughter's husband, Proetus. But when he had received from him the evil token of his daughter's husband, first he bade him slay the raging Chimaera. 6.179. /then at length he questioned him and asked to see whatever token he bare from his daughter's husband, Proetus. But when he had received from him the evil token of his daughter's husband, first he bade him slay the raging Chimaera. 6.180. /She was of divine stock, not of men, in the fore part a lion, in the hinder a serpent, and in the midst a goat, breathing forth in terrible wise the might of blazing fire. And Bellerophon slew her, trusting in the signs of the gods. Next fought he with the glorious Solymi 6.181. /She was of divine stock, not of men, in the fore part a lion, in the hinder a serpent, and in the midst a goat, breathing forth in terrible wise the might of blazing fire. And Bellerophon slew her, trusting in the signs of the gods. Next fought he with the glorious Solymi 6.182. /She was of divine stock, not of men, in the fore part a lion, in the hinder a serpent, and in the midst a goat, breathing forth in terrible wise the might of blazing fire. And Bellerophon slew her, trusting in the signs of the gods. Next fought he with the glorious Solymi 6.183. /She was of divine stock, not of men, in the fore part a lion, in the hinder a serpent, and in the midst a goat, breathing forth in terrible wise the might of blazing fire. And Bellerophon slew her, trusting in the signs of the gods. Next fought he with the glorious Solymi 6.184. /She was of divine stock, not of men, in the fore part a lion, in the hinder a serpent, and in the midst a goat, breathing forth in terrible wise the might of blazing fire. And Bellerophon slew her, trusting in the signs of the gods. Next fought he with the glorious Solymi 6.185. /and this, said he was the mightest battle of warriors that ever he entered; and thirdly he slew the Amazons, women the peers of men. And against him, as he journeyed back therefrom, the king wove another cunning wile; he chose out of wide Lycia the bravest men and set an ambush; but these returned not home in any wise 6.186. /and this, said he was the mightest battle of warriors that ever he entered; and thirdly he slew the Amazons, women the peers of men. And against him, as he journeyed back therefrom, the king wove another cunning wile; he chose out of wide Lycia the bravest men and set an ambush; but these returned not home in any wise 6.187. /and this, said he was the mightest battle of warriors that ever he entered; and thirdly he slew the Amazons, women the peers of men. And against him, as he journeyed back therefrom, the king wove another cunning wile; he chose out of wide Lycia the bravest men and set an ambush; but these returned not home in any wise 6.188. /and this, said he was the mightest battle of warriors that ever he entered; and thirdly he slew the Amazons, women the peers of men. And against him, as he journeyed back therefrom, the king wove another cunning wile; he chose out of wide Lycia the bravest men and set an ambush; but these returned not home in any wise 6.189. /and this, said he was the mightest battle of warriors that ever he entered; and thirdly he slew the Amazons, women the peers of men. And against him, as he journeyed back therefrom, the king wove another cunning wile; he chose out of wide Lycia the bravest men and set an ambush; but these returned not home in any wise 6.190. /for peerless Bellerophon slew them one and all. 6.191. /for peerless Bellerophon slew them one and all. 6.192. /for peerless Bellerophon slew them one and all. 6.193. /for peerless Bellerophon slew them one and all. 6.194. /for peerless Bellerophon slew them one and all. But when the king now knew that he was the valiant offspring of a god, he kept him there, and offered him his own daughter, and gave to him the half of all his kingly honour; moreover the Lycians meted out for him a demesne pre-eminent above all 6.195. /a fair tract of orchard and of plough-land, to possess it. And the lady bare to wise-hearted Bellerophon three children, Isander and Hippolochus and Laodameia. With Laodameia lay Zeus the counsellor, and she bare godlike Sarpedon, the warrior harnessed in bronze. 6.196. /a fair tract of orchard and of plough-land, to possess it. And the lady bare to wise-hearted Bellerophon three children, Isander and Hippolochus and Laodameia. With Laodameia lay Zeus the counsellor, and she bare godlike Sarpedon, the warrior harnessed in bronze. 6.197. /a fair tract of orchard and of plough-land, to possess it. And the lady bare to wise-hearted Bellerophon three children, Isander and Hippolochus and Laodameia. With Laodameia lay Zeus the counsellor, and she bare godlike Sarpedon, the warrior harnessed in bronze. 6.198. /a fair tract of orchard and of plough-land, to possess it. And the lady bare to wise-hearted Bellerophon three children, Isander and Hippolochus and Laodameia. With Laodameia lay Zeus the counsellor, and she bare godlike Sarpedon, the warrior harnessed in bronze. 6.199. /a fair tract of orchard and of plough-land, to possess it. And the lady bare to wise-hearted Bellerophon three children, Isander and Hippolochus and Laodameia. With Laodameia lay Zeus the counsellor, and she bare godlike Sarpedon, the warrior harnessed in bronze. 6.200. /But when even Bellerophon came to be hated of all the gods, then verily he wandered alone over the Aleian plain, devouring his own soul, and shunning the paths of men; and Isander his son was slain by Ares, insatiate of battle, as he fought against the glorious Solymi; 6.201. /But when even Bellerophon came to be hated of all the gods, then verily he wandered alone over the Aleian plain, devouring his own soul, and shunning the paths of men; and Isander his son was slain by Ares, insatiate of battle, as he fought against the glorious Solymi; 6.202. /But when even Bellerophon came to be hated of all the gods, then verily he wandered alone over the Aleian plain, devouring his own soul, and shunning the paths of men; and Isander his son was slain by Ares, insatiate of battle, as he fought against the glorious Solymi; 6.203. /But when even Bellerophon came to be hated of all the gods, then verily he wandered alone over the Aleian plain, devouring his own soul, and shunning the paths of men; and Isander his son was slain by Ares, insatiate of battle, as he fought against the glorious Solymi; 6.204. /But when even Bellerophon came to be hated of all the gods, then verily he wandered alone over the Aleian plain, devouring his own soul, and shunning the paths of men; and Isander his son was slain by Ares, insatiate of battle, as he fought against the glorious Solymi; 6.205. /and his daughter was slain in wrath by Artemis of the golden reins. But Hippolochus begat me and of him do I declare that I am sprung; and he sent me to Troy and straitly charged me ever to be bravest and pre-eminent above all, and not bring shame upon the race of my fathers 6.206. /and his daughter was slain in wrath by Artemis of the golden reins. But Hippolochus begat me and of him do I declare that I am sprung; and he sent me to Troy and straitly charged me ever to be bravest and pre-eminent above all, and not bring shame upon the race of my fathers 6.207. /and his daughter was slain in wrath by Artemis of the golden reins. But Hippolochus begat me and of him do I declare that I am sprung; and he sent me to Troy and straitly charged me ever to be bravest and pre-eminent above all, and not bring shame upon the race of my fathers 6.208. /and his daughter was slain in wrath by Artemis of the golden reins. But Hippolochus begat me and of him do I declare that I am sprung; and he sent me to Troy and straitly charged me ever to be bravest and pre-eminent above all, and not bring shame upon the race of my fathers 6.209. /and his daughter was slain in wrath by Artemis of the golden reins. But Hippolochus begat me and of him do I declare that I am sprung; and he sent me to Troy and straitly charged me ever to be bravest and pre-eminent above all, and not bring shame upon the race of my fathers 6.210. /that were far the noblest in Ephyre and in wide Lycia. This is the lineage and the blood whereof I avow me sprung. So spake he, and Diomedes, good at the warcry, waxed glad. He planted his spear in the bounteous earth, and with gentle words spake to the shepherd of the host: 6.211. /that were far the noblest in Ephyre and in wide Lycia. This is the lineage and the blood whereof I avow me sprung. So spake he, and Diomedes, good at the warcry, waxed glad. He planted his spear in the bounteous earth, and with gentle words spake to the shepherd of the host: 6.212. /that were far the noblest in Ephyre and in wide Lycia. This is the lineage and the blood whereof I avow me sprung. So spake he, and Diomedes, good at the warcry, waxed glad. He planted his spear in the bounteous earth, and with gentle words spake to the shepherd of the host: 6.213. /that were far the noblest in Ephyre and in wide Lycia. This is the lineage and the blood whereof I avow me sprung. So spake he, and Diomedes, good at the warcry, waxed glad. He planted his spear in the bounteous earth, and with gentle words spake to the shepherd of the host: 6.214. /that were far the noblest in Ephyre and in wide Lycia. This is the lineage and the blood whereof I avow me sprung. So spake he, and Diomedes, good at the warcry, waxed glad. He planted his spear in the bounteous earth, and with gentle words spake to the shepherd of the host: 6.215. / Verily now art thou a friend of my father's house from of old: for goodly Oeneus on a time entertained peerless Bellerophon in his halls, and kept him twenty days; and moreover they gave one to the other fair gifts of friendship. Oeneus gave a belt bright with scarlet 6.216. / Verily now art thou a friend of my father's house from of old: for goodly Oeneus on a time entertained peerless Bellerophon in his halls, and kept him twenty days; and moreover they gave one to the other fair gifts of friendship. Oeneus gave a belt bright with scarlet 6.217. / Verily now art thou a friend of my father's house from of old: for goodly Oeneus on a time entertained peerless Bellerophon in his halls, and kept him twenty days; and moreover they gave one to the other fair gifts of friendship. Oeneus gave a belt bright with scarlet 6.218. / Verily now art thou a friend of my father's house from of old: for goodly Oeneus on a time entertained peerless Bellerophon in his halls, and kept him twenty days; and moreover they gave one to the other fair gifts of friendship. Oeneus gave a belt bright with scarlet 6.219. / Verily now art thou a friend of my father's house from of old: for goodly Oeneus on a time entertained peerless Bellerophon in his halls, and kept him twenty days; and moreover they gave one to the other fair gifts of friendship. Oeneus gave a belt bright with scarlet 6.220. /and Bellerophon a double cup of gold which I left in my palace as I came hither. But Tydeus I remember not, seeing I was but a little child when he left, what time the host of the Achaeans perished at Thebes. Therefore now am I a dear guest-friend to thee in the midst of Argos 6.221. /and Bellerophon a double cup of gold which I left in my palace as I came hither. But Tydeus I remember not, seeing I was but a little child when he left, what time the host of the Achaeans perished at Thebes. Therefore now am I a dear guest-friend to thee in the midst of Argos 6.222. /and Bellerophon a double cup of gold which I left in my palace as I came hither. But Tydeus I remember not, seeing I was but a little child when he left, what time the host of the Achaeans perished at Thebes. Therefore now am I a dear guest-friend to thee in the midst of Argos 6.223. /and Bellerophon a double cup of gold which I left in my palace as I came hither. But Tydeus I remember not, seeing I was but a little child when he left, what time the host of the Achaeans perished at Thebes. Therefore now am I a dear guest-friend to thee in the midst of Argos 6.224. /and Bellerophon a double cup of gold which I left in my palace as I came hither. But Tydeus I remember not, seeing I was but a little child when he left, what time the host of the Achaeans perished at Thebes. Therefore now am I a dear guest-friend to thee in the midst of Argos 6.225. /and thou to me in Lycia, whenso I journey to the land of that folk. So let us shun one another's spears even amid the throng; full many there be for me to slay, both Trojans and famed allies, whomsoever a god shall grant me and my feet overtake; 6.226. /and thou to me in Lycia, whenso I journey to the land of that folk. So let us shun one another's spears even amid the throng; full many there be for me to slay, both Trojans and famed allies, whomsoever a god shall grant me and my feet overtake; 6.227. /and thou to me in Lycia, whenso I journey to the land of that folk. So let us shun one another's spears even amid the throng; full many there be for me to slay, both Trojans and famed allies, whomsoever a god shall grant me and my feet overtake; 6.228. /and thou to me in Lycia, whenso I journey to the land of that folk. So let us shun one another's spears even amid the throng; full many there be for me to slay, both Trojans and famed allies, whomsoever a god shall grant me and my feet overtake; 6.229. /and thou to me in Lycia, whenso I journey to the land of that folk. So let us shun one another's spears even amid the throng; full many there be for me to slay, both Trojans and famed allies, whomsoever a god shall grant me and my feet overtake; 6.230. /and many Achaeans again for thee to slay whomsoever thou canst. And let us make exchange of armour, each with the other, that these men too may know that we declare ourselves to be friends from our fathers' days. 6.231. /and many Achaeans again for thee to slay whomsoever thou canst. And let us make exchange of armour, each with the other, that these men too may know that we declare ourselves to be friends from our fathers' days. 6.232. /and many Achaeans again for thee to slay whomsoever thou canst. And let us make exchange of armour, each with the other, that these men too may know that we declare ourselves to be friends from our fathers' days. 6.233. /and many Achaeans again for thee to slay whomsoever thou canst. And let us make exchange of armour, each with the other, that these men too may know that we declare ourselves to be friends from our fathers' days. 6.234. /and many Achaeans again for thee to slay whomsoever thou canst. And let us make exchange of armour, each with the other, that these men too may know that we declare ourselves to be friends from our fathers' days. When they had thus spoken, the twain leapt down from their chariots and clasped each other's hands and pledged their faith. And then from Glaucus did Zeus, son of Cronos, take away his wit 6.235. /seeing he made exchange of armour with Diomedes, son of Tydeus, giving golden for bronze, the worth of an hundred oxen for the worth of nine.But when Hector was come to the Scaean gate and the oak-tree, round about him came running the wives and daughters of the Trojans asking of their sons and brethren and friends 6.236. /seeing he made exchange of armour with Diomedes, son of Tydeus, giving golden for bronze, the worth of an hundred oxen for the worth of nine.But when Hector was come to the Scaean gate and the oak-tree, round about him came running the wives and daughters of the Trojans asking of their sons and brethren and friends 6.389. /fair-tressed Trojan women are seeking to propitiate the dread goddess; but she went to the great wall of Ilios, for that she heard the Trojans were sorely pressed, and great victory rested with the Achaeans. So is she gone in haste to the wall, like one beside herself; and with her the nurse beareth the child. 9.497. /to the end that thou mayest hereafter save me from shameful ruin. Wherefore Achilles, do thou master thy proud spirit; it beseemeth thee not to have a pitiless heart. Nay, even the very gods can bend, and theirs withal is more excellent worth and honour and might. Their hearts by incense and reverent vows 11.123. /even so was no one of the Trojans able to ward off destruction from these twain, but themselves were driven in flight before the Argives. 11.124. /even so was no one of the Trojans able to ward off destruction from these twain, but themselves were driven in flight before the Argives. Then took he Peisander and Hippolochus, staunch in fight. Sons were they of wise-hearted Antimachus, who above all others in hope to receive gold from Alexander, goodly gifts 11.125. /would not suffer that Helen be given back to fair-haired Menelaus. His two sons lord Agamemnon took, the twain being in one car, and together were they seeking to drive the swift horses, for the shining reins had slipped from their hands, and the two horses were running wild; but he rushed against them like a lion 11.138. /should he hear that we are alive at the ships of the Achaeans. So with weeping the twain spake unto the king with gentle words, but all ungentle was the voice they heard:If ye are verily the sons of wise-hearted Antimachus, who on a time in the gathering of the Trojans, when Menelaus 11.139. /should he hear that we are alive at the ships of the Achaeans. So with weeping the twain spake unto the king with gentle words, but all ungentle was the voice they heard:If ye are verily the sons of wise-hearted Antimachus, who on a time in the gathering of the Trojans, when Menelaus 11.140. /had come on an embassage with godlike Odysseus, bade slay him then and there, neither suffer him to return to the Achaeans, now of a surety shall ye pay the price of your father's foul outrage. He spake, and thrust Peisander from his chariot to the ground, smiting him with his spear upon the breast, and backward was he hurled upon the earth. 14.313. /lest haply thou mightest wax wroth with me hereafter, if without a word I depart to the house of deep-flowing Oceanus. 14.314. /lest haply thou mightest wax wroth with me hereafter, if without a word I depart to the house of deep-flowing Oceanus. Then in answer spake to her Zeus, the cloud-gatherer.Hera, thither mayest thou go even hereafter. But for us twain, come, let us take our joy couched together in love; 14.315. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.316. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.317. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.318. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.319. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.320. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.321. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.322. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.323. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.324. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.325. /and Semele bare Dionysus, the joy of mortals; nor of Demeter, the fair-tressed queen; nor of glorious Leto; nay, nor yet of thine own self, as now I love thee, and sweet desire layeth hold of me. Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him: 14.326. /and Semele bare Dionysus, the joy of mortals; nor of Demeter, the fair-tressed queen; nor of glorious Leto; nay, nor yet of thine own self, as now I love thee, and sweet desire layeth hold of me. Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him: 14.327. /and Semele bare Dionysus, the joy of mortals; nor of Demeter, the fair-tressed queen; nor of glorious Leto; nay, nor yet of thine own self, as now I love thee, and sweet desire layeth hold of me. Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him: 14.328. /and Semele bare Dionysus, the joy of mortals; nor of Demeter, the fair-tressed queen; nor of glorious Leto; nay, nor yet of thine own self, as now I love thee, and sweet desire layeth hold of me. Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him: 18.109. /I that in war am such as is none other of the brazen-coated Achaeans, albeit in council there be others better— so may strife perish from among gods and men, and anger that setteth a man on to grow wroth, how wise soever he be, and that sweeter far than trickling honey 18.394. /a beautiful chair, richly-wrought, and beneath was a footstool for the feet; and she called to Hephaestus, the famed craftsman, and spake to him, saying:Hephaestus, come forth hither; Thetis hath need of thee. And the famous god of the two strong arms answered her:Verily then a dread and honoured goddess is within my halls 18.395. /even she that saved me when pain was come upon me after I had fallen afar through the will of my shameless mother, that was fain to hide me away by reason of my lameness. Then had I suffered woes in heart, had not Eurynome and Thetis received me into their bosom—Eurynome, daughter of backward-flowing Oceanus. 18.396. /even she that saved me when pain was come upon me after I had fallen afar through the will of my shameless mother, that was fain to hide me away by reason of my lameness. Then had I suffered woes in heart, had not Eurynome and Thetis received me into their bosom—Eurynome, daughter of backward-flowing Oceanus. 18.397. /even she that saved me when pain was come upon me after I had fallen afar through the will of my shameless mother, that was fain to hide me away by reason of my lameness. Then had I suffered woes in heart, had not Eurynome and Thetis received me into their bosom—Eurynome, daughter of backward-flowing Oceanus. 18.398. /even she that saved me when pain was come upon me after I had fallen afar through the will of my shameless mother, that was fain to hide me away by reason of my lameness. Then had I suffered woes in heart, had not Eurynome and Thetis received me into their bosom—Eurynome, daughter of backward-flowing Oceanus. 18.399. /even she that saved me when pain was come upon me after I had fallen afar through the will of my shameless mother, that was fain to hide me away by reason of my lameness. Then had I suffered woes in heart, had not Eurynome and Thetis received me into their bosom—Eurynome, daughter of backward-flowing Oceanus. 18.400. /With them then for nine years' space I forged much cunning handiwork, brooches, and spiral arm-bands, and rosettes and necklaces, within their hollow cave; and round about me flowed, murmuring with foam, the stream of Oceanus, a flood unspeakable. Neither did any other know thereof, either of gods or of mortal men 18.401. /With them then for nine years' space I forged much cunning handiwork, brooches, and spiral arm-bands, and rosettes and necklaces, within their hollow cave; and round about me flowed, murmuring with foam, the stream of Oceanus, a flood unspeakable. Neither did any other know thereof, either of gods or of mortal men 18.402. /With them then for nine years' space I forged much cunning handiwork, brooches, and spiral arm-bands, and rosettes and necklaces, within their hollow cave; and round about me flowed, murmuring with foam, the stream of Oceanus, a flood unspeakable. Neither did any other know thereof, either of gods or of mortal men 18.403. /With them then for nine years' space I forged much cunning handiwork, brooches, and spiral arm-bands, and rosettes and necklaces, within their hollow cave; and round about me flowed, murmuring with foam, the stream of Oceanus, a flood unspeakable. Neither did any other know thereof, either of gods or of mortal men 18.404. /With them then for nine years' space I forged much cunning handiwork, brooches, and spiral arm-bands, and rosettes and necklaces, within their hollow cave; and round about me flowed, murmuring with foam, the stream of Oceanus, a flood unspeakable. Neither did any other know thereof, either of gods or of mortal men 18.405. /but Thetis knew and Eurynome, even they that saved me. And now is Thetis come to my house; wherefore it verily behoveth me to pay unto fair-tressed Thetis the full price for the saving of my life. But do thou set before her fair entertainment, while I put aside my bellows and all my tools. 18.406. /but Thetis knew and Eurynome, even they that saved me. And now is Thetis come to my house; wherefore it verily behoveth me to pay unto fair-tressed Thetis the full price for the saving of my life. But do thou set before her fair entertainment, while I put aside my bellows and all my tools. 18.407. /but Thetis knew and Eurynome, even they that saved me. And now is Thetis come to my house; wherefore it verily behoveth me to pay unto fair-tressed Thetis the full price for the saving of my life. But do thou set before her fair entertainment, while I put aside my bellows and all my tools. 18.408. /but Thetis knew and Eurynome, even they that saved me. And now is Thetis come to my house; wherefore it verily behoveth me to pay unto fair-tressed Thetis the full price for the saving of my life. But do thou set before her fair entertainment, while I put aside my bellows and all my tools. 20.300. /Nay, come, let us head him forth from out of death, lest the son of Cronos be anywise wroth, if so be Achilles slay him; for it is ordained unto him to escape, that the race of Dardanus perish not without seed and be seen no more—of Dardanus whom the son of Cronos loved above all the children born to him 20.301. /Nay, come, let us head him forth from out of death, lest the son of Cronos be anywise wroth, if so be Achilles slay him; for it is ordained unto him to escape, that the race of Dardanus perish not without seed and be seen no more—of Dardanus whom the son of Cronos loved above all the children born to him 20.302. /Nay, come, let us head him forth from out of death, lest the son of Cronos be anywise wroth, if so be Achilles slay him; for it is ordained unto him to escape, that the race of Dardanus perish not without seed and be seen no more—of Dardanus whom the son of Cronos loved above all the children born to him 20.303. /Nay, come, let us head him forth from out of death, lest the son of Cronos be anywise wroth, if so be Achilles slay him; for it is ordained unto him to escape, that the race of Dardanus perish not without seed and be seen no more—of Dardanus whom the son of Cronos loved above all the children born to him 20.304. /Nay, come, let us head him forth from out of death, lest the son of Cronos be anywise wroth, if so be Achilles slay him; for it is ordained unto him to escape, that the race of Dardanus perish not without seed and be seen no more—of Dardanus whom the son of Cronos loved above all the children born to him 20.305. /from mortal women. For at length hath the son of Cronos come to hate the race of Priam; and now verily shall the mighty Aeneas be king among the Trojans, and his sons' sons that shall be born in days to come. 20.306. /from mortal women. For at length hath the son of Cronos come to hate the race of Priam; and now verily shall the mighty Aeneas be king among the Trojans, and his sons' sons that shall be born in days to come. 20.307. /from mortal women. For at length hath the son of Cronos come to hate the race of Priam; and now verily shall the mighty Aeneas be king among the Trojans, and his sons' sons that shall be born in days to come. 20.308. /from mortal women. For at length hath the son of Cronos come to hate the race of Priam; and now verily shall the mighty Aeneas be king among the Trojans, and his sons' sons that shall be born in days to come. 20.313. / Shaker of Earth, of thine own self take counsel in thine heart as touching Aeneas, whether thou wilt save him or suffer him to be slain for all his valour by Achilles, Peleus' son. We twain verily, even Pallas Athene and I 20.314. / Shaker of Earth, of thine own self take counsel in thine heart as touching Aeneas, whether thou wilt save him or suffer him to be slain for all his valour by Achilles, Peleus' son. We twain verily, even Pallas Athene and I 20.315. /have sworn oaths full many among the immortals never to ward off from the Trojans the day of evil, nay, not when all Troy shall burn in the burning of consuming fire, and the warlike sons of the Achaeans shall be the burners thereof. Now when Poseidon, the Shaker of Earth, heard this, he went his way amid the battle and the hurtling of spears 20.316. /have sworn oaths full many among the immortals never to ward off from the Trojans the day of evil, nay, not when all Troy shall burn in the burning of consuming fire, and the warlike sons of the Achaeans shall be the burners thereof. Now when Poseidon, the Shaker of Earth, heard this, he went his way amid the battle and the hurtling of spears 20.317. /have sworn oaths full many among the immortals never to ward off from the Trojans the day of evil, nay, not when all Troy shall burn in the burning of consuming fire, and the warlike sons of the Achaeans shall be the burners thereof. Now when Poseidon, the Shaker of Earth, heard this, he went his way amid the battle and the hurtling of spears 21.441. /it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.442. /it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.443. /it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.444. /it were not meet for me, seeing I am the elder-born and know the more. Fool, how witless is the heart thou hast! Neither rememberest thou all the woes that we twain alone of all the gods endured at Ilios, what time we came 21.445. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.446. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.447. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.448. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.449. /at the bidding of Zeus and served the lordly Laomedon for a year's space at a fixed wage, and he was our taskmaster and laid on us his commands. I verily built for the Trojans round about their city a wall, wide and exceeding fair, that the city might never be broken; and thou, Phoebus, didst herd the sleek kine of shambling gait amid the spurs of wooded Ida, the many-ridged. 21.450. /But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.451. /But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.452. /But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.453. /But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.454. /But when at length the glad seasons were bringing to its end the term of our hire, then did dread Laomedon defraud us twain of all hire, and send us away with a threatening word. He threatened that he would bind together our feet and our hands above, and would sell us into isles that lie afar. 21.455. /Aye, and he made as if he would lop off with the bronze the ears of us both. So we twain fared aback with angry hearts, wroth for the hire he promised but gave us not. It is to his folk now that thou showest favour, neither seekest thou with us that the overweening Trojans may perish miserably 21.456. /Aye, and he made as if he would lop off with the bronze the ears of us both. So we twain fared aback with angry hearts, wroth for the hire he promised but gave us not. It is to his folk now that thou showest favour, neither seekest thou with us that the overweening Trojans may perish miserably 21.457. /Aye, and he made as if he would lop off with the bronze the ears of us both. So we twain fared aback with angry hearts, wroth for the hire he promised but gave us not. It is to his folk now that thou showest favour, neither seekest thou with us that the overweening Trojans may perish miserably 21.458. /Aye, and he made as if he would lop off with the bronze the ears of us both. So we twain fared aback with angry hearts, wroth for the hire he promised but gave us not. It is to his folk now that thou showest favour, neither seekest thou with us that the overweening Trojans may perish miserably 21.459. /Aye, and he made as if he would lop off with the bronze the ears of us both. So we twain fared aback with angry hearts, wroth for the hire he promised but gave us not. It is to his folk now that thou showest favour, neither seekest thou with us that the overweening Trojans may perish miserably 21.460. /in utter ruin with their children and their honoured wives. Then spake unto him lord Apollo, that worketh afar:Shaker of Earth, as nowise sound of mind wouldest thou count me, if I should war with thee for the sake of mortals, pitiful creatures, that like unto leaves 22.26. /Him the old man Priam was first to behold with his eyes, as he sped all-gleaming over the plain, like to the star that cometh forth at harvest-time, and brightly do his rays shine amid the host of stars in the darkness of night, the star that men call by name the Dog of Orion. 22.27. /Him the old man Priam was first to behold with his eyes, as he sped all-gleaming over the plain, like to the star that cometh forth at harvest-time, and brightly do his rays shine amid the host of stars in the darkness of night, the star that men call by name the Dog of Orion. 22.28. /Him the old man Priam was first to behold with his eyes, as he sped all-gleaming over the plain, like to the star that cometh forth at harvest-time, and brightly do his rays shine amid the host of stars in the darkness of night, the star that men call by name the Dog of Orion. 22.29. /Him the old man Priam was first to behold with his eyes, as he sped all-gleaming over the plain, like to the star that cometh forth at harvest-time, and brightly do his rays shine amid the host of stars in the darkness of night, the star that men call by name the Dog of Orion. 22.30. /Brightest of all is he, yet withal is he a sign of evil, and bringeth much fever upon wretched mortals. Even in such wise did the bronze gleam upon the breast of Achilles as he ran. And the old man uttered a groan, and beat upon his head with his hands, lifting them up on high, and with a groan he called aloud 22.31. /Brightest of all is he, yet withal is he a sign of evil, and bringeth much fever upon wretched mortals. Even in such wise did the bronze gleam upon the breast of Achilles as he ran. And the old man uttered a groan, and beat upon his head with his hands, lifting them up on high, and with a groan he called aloud 22.460. /So saying she hasted through the hall with throbbing heart as one beside herself, and with her went her handmaidens. But when she was come to the wall and the throng of men, then on the wall she stopped and looked, and was ware of him as he was dragged before the city; and swift horses 23.91. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.92. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 24.49. /the which harmeth men greatly and profiteth them withal. Lo, it may be that a man hath lost one dearer even than was this—a brother, that the selfsame mother bare, or haply a son; yet verily when he hath wept and wailed for him he maketh an end; for an enduring soul have the Fates given unto men.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 3.147, 4.805, 5.122, 11.321-11.325, 24.73-24.74 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 168-183, 218-223, 167 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

167. οὐδʼ ὅστις πάροιθεν ἦν μέγας 167. Not — whosoever was the great of yore
4. Aeschylus, Persians, 821-830, 820 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

820. ὡς οὐχ ὑπέρφευ θνητὸν ὄντα χρὴ φρονεῖν. 820. that mortal man should not vaunt himself excessively. For presumptuous pride, when it has matured, bears as its fruit a crop of calamity, from which it reaps an abundant harvest of tears. Bear in mind that such are the penalties for deeds like these, and hold Athens and Hellas in your memory. Let no one of you
5. Anacreon, Fragments, 357 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Anacreon, Fragments, 357 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 135, 134 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

134. καί ς' ὦ νεανίσχ' ὅστις εἶ, κατ' Αἰσχύλον
8. Euripides, Bacchae, 1043-1129, 113, 1130-1139, 114, 1140-1152, 1255, 1297, 1301-1302, 1344-1348, 1378, 2, 20-21, 214-216, 22-23, 3, 31, 312-317, 32, 325, 33-34, 343-346, 35-38, 389, 39, 390-392, 395-397, 4, 40, 43-49, 5, 50, 53-54, 620-641, 647, 670-671, 677-774, 790, 877-881, 897-898, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ἥκω Διὸς παῖς τήνδε Θηβαίων χθόνα 1. I, the son of Zeus, have come to this land of the Thebans—Dionysus, whom once Semele, Kadmos’ daughter, bore, delivered by a lightning-bearing flame. And having taken a mortal form instead of a god’s
9. Euripides, Helen, 1666-1667, 1408 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1424-1430, 1423 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 1447-1457, 1446 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Rhesus, 971-973, 970 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

970. Alone for ever, in a caverned place
13. Herodotus, Histories, 1.30.2, 1.32.8, 4.78-4.80 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.30.2. After Solon had seen everything and had thought about it, Croesus found the opportunity to say, “My Athenian guest, we have heard a lot about you because of your wisdom and of your wanderings, how as one who loves learning you have traveled much of the world for the sake of seeing it, so now I desire to ask you who is the most fortunate man you have seen.” 1.32.8. It is impossible for one who is only human to obtain all these things at the same time, just as no land is self-sufficient in what it produces. Each country has one thing but lacks another; whichever has the most is the best. Just so no human being is self-sufficient; each person has one thing but lacks another. 4.78. This, then, was how Anacharsis fared, owing to his foreign ways and consorting with Greeks; and a great many years afterward, Scyles, son of Ariapithes, suffered a like fate. Scyles was one of the sons born to Ariapithes, king of Scythia; but his mother was of Istria, and not native-born; and she taught him to speak and read Greek. ,As time passed, Ariapithes was treacherously killed by Spargapithes, king of the Agathyrsi, and Scyles inherited the kingship and his father's wife, a Scythian woman whose name was Opoea, and she bore Scyles a son, Oricus. ,So Scyles was king of Scythia; but he was in no way content with the Scythian way of life, and was much more inclined to Greek ways, from the upbringing that he had received. So this is what he would do: he would lead the Scythian army to the city of the Borysthenites (who say that they are Milesians), and when he arrived there would leave his army in the suburb of the city, ,while he himself, entering within the walls and shutting the gates, would take off his Scythian apparel and put on Greek dress; and in it he would go among the townsfolk unattended by spearmen or any others (who would guard the gates, lest any Scythian see him wearing this apparel), and in every way follow the Greek manner of life, and worship the gods according to Greek usage. ,When he had spent a month or more like this, he would put on Scythian dress and leave the city. He did this often; and he built a house in Borysthenes, and married a wife of the people of the country and brought her there. 4.79. But when things had to turn out badly for him, they did so for this reason: he conceived a desire to be initiated into the rites of the Bacchic Dionysus; and when he was about to begin the sacred mysteries, he saw the greatest vision. ,He had in the city of the Borysthenites a spacious house, grand and costly (the same house I just mentioned), all surrounded by sphinxes and griffins worked in white marble; this house was struck by a thunderbolt. And though the house burnt to the ground, Scyles none the less performed the rite to the end. ,Now the Scythians reproach the Greeks for this Bacchic revelling, saying that it is not reasonable to set up a god who leads men to madness. ,So when Scyles had been initiated into the Bacchic rite, some one of the Borysthenites scoffed at the Scythians: “You laugh at us, Scythians, because we play the Bacchant and the god possesses us; but now this deity has possessed your own king, so that he plays the Bacchant and is maddened by the god. If you will not believe me, follow me now and I will show him to you.” ,The leading men among the Scythians followed him, and the Borysthenite brought them up secretly onto a tower; from which, when Scyles passed by with his company of worshippers, they saw him playing the Bacchant; thinking it a great misfortune, they left the city and told the whole army what they had seen. 4.80. After this Scyles rode off to his own place; but the Scythians rebelled against him, setting up his brother Octamasades, son of the daughter of Teres, for their king. ,Scyles, learning what had happened concerning him and the reason why it had happened, fled into Thrace; and when Octamasades heard this he led his army there. But when he was beside the Ister, the Thracians barred his way; and when the armies were about to engage, Sitalces sent this message to Octamasades: ,“Why should we try each other's strength? You are my sister's son, and you have my brother with you; give him back to me, and I will give up your Scyles to you; and let us not endanger our armies.” ,Such was the offer Sitalces sent to him; for Sitalces' brother had fled from him and was with Octamasades. The Scythian agreed to this, and took his brother Scyles, giving up his own uncle to Sitalces. ,Sitalces then took his brother and carried him away, but Octamasades beheaded Scyles on the spot. This is how closely the Scythians guard their customs, and these are the penalties they inflict on those who add foreign customs to their own.
14. Sophocles, Antigone, 955-965, 943 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Plautus, Menaechmi, 836-842, 857-858, 862-868, 870-871, 835 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

16. Eratosthenes, Catasterismi, 24 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

17. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 3.65.5-3.65.7, 5.50, 5.52, 5.52.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.65.5.  Consequently he sailed across secretly to his army, and then Lycurgus, they say, falling upon the Maenads in the city known as Nysium, slew them all, but Dionysus, bringing his forces over, conquered the Thracians in a battle, and taking Lycurgus alive put out his eyes and inflicted upon him every kind of outrage, and then crucified him. 3.65.6.  Thereupon, out of gratitude to Charops for the aid the man had rendered him, Dionysus made over to him the kingdom of the Thracians and instructed him in the secret rites connected with the initiations; and Oeagrus, the son of Charops, then took over both the kingdom and the initiatory rites which were handed down in the mysteries, the rites which afterwards Orpheus, the son of Oeagrus, who was the superior of all men in natural gifts and education, learned from his father; Orpheus also made many changes in the practices and for that reason the rites which had been established by Dionysus were also called "Orphic. 3.65.7.  But some of the poets, one of whom is Antimachus, state that Lycurgus was king, not of Thrace, but of Arabia, and that the attack upon Dionysus and the Bacchantes was made at the Nysa which is in Arabia. However this may be, Dionysus, they say, punished the impious but treated all other men honourably, and then made his return journey from India to Thebes upon an elephant. 5.50. 1.  Since we have set forth the facts concerning Samothrace, we shall now, in accordance with our plan, discuss Naxos. This island was first called Strongylê and its first settlers were men from Thrace, the reasons for their coming being somewhat as follows.,2.  The myth relates that two sons, Butes and Lycurgus, were born to Boreas, but not by the same mother; and Butes, who was the younger, formed a plot against his brother, and on being discovered he received no punishment from Lycurgus beyond that he was ordered by Lycurgus to gather ships and, together with his accomplices in the plot, to seek out another land in which to make his home.,3.  Consequently Butes, together with the Thracians who were implicated with him, set forth, and making his way through the islands of the Cyclades he seized the island of Strongylê, where he made his home and proceeded to plunder many of those who sailed past the island. And since they had no women they sailed here and there and seized them from the land.,4.  Now some of the islands of the Cyclades had no inhabitants whatsoever and others were sparsely settled; consequently they sailed further, and having been repulsed once from Euboea, they sailed to Thessaly, where Butes and his companions, upon landing, came upon the female devotees of Dionysus as they were celebrating the orgies of the god near Drius, as it is called, in Achaea Phthiotis.,5.  As Butes and his companions rushed at the women, these threw away the sacred objects, and some of them fled for safety to the sea, and others to the mountain called Dius; but Coronis, the myth continues, was seized by Butes and forced to lie with him. And she, in anger at the seizure and at the insolent treatment she had received, called upon Dionysus to lend her his aid. And the god struck Butes with madness, because of which he lost his mind and, throwing himself into a well, met his death.,6.  But the rest of the Thracians seized some of the other women, the most renowned of whom were Iphimedeia, the wife of Aloeus, and Pancratis, her daughter, and taking these women along with them, they sailed off to Strongylê. And in place of Butes the Thracians made Agassamenus king of the island, and to him they united in marriage Pancratis, the daughter of Aloeus, who was a woman of surpassing beauty;,7.  for, before their choice fell on Agassamenus, the most renowned among their leaders, Sicelus and Hecetorus, had quarrelled over Pancratis and had slain each other. And Agassamenus appointed one of his friends his lieutet and united Iphimedeia to him in marriage. 5.52. 1.  The myth which the Naxians have to relate about Dionysus is like this: He was reared, they say, in their country, and for this reason the island has been most dear to him and is called by some Dionysias.,2.  For according to the myth which has been handed down to us, Zeus, on the occasion when Semelê had been slain by his lightning before the time for bearing the child, took the babe and sewed it up within his thigh, and when the appointed time came for its birth, wishing to keep the matter concealed from Hera, he took the babe from his thigh in what is now Naxos and gave it to the Nymphs of the island, Philia, Coronis, and Cleidê, to be reared. The reason Zeus slew Semelê with his lightning before she could give birth to her child was his desire that the babe should be born, not of a mortal woman but of two immortals, and thus should be immortal from its very birth.,3.  And because of the kindness which the inhabitants of Naxos had shown to Dionysus in connection with his rearing they received marks of his gratitude; for the island increased in prosperity and fitted out notable naval forces, and the Naxians were the first to withdraw from the naval forces of Xerxes and to aid in the defeat at sea which the barbarian suffered, and they participated with distinction in the battle of Plataeae. Also the wine of the island possesses an excellence which is peculiarly its own and offers proof of the friendship which the god entertains for the island. 5.52.2.  For according to the myth which has been handed down to us, Zeus, on the occasion when Semelê had been slain by his lightning before the time for bearing the child, took the babe and sewed it up within his thigh, and when the appointed time came for its birth, wishing to keep the matter concealed from Hera, he took the babe from his thigh in what is now Naxos and gave it to the Nymphs of the island, Philia, Coronis, and Cleidê, to be reared. The reason Zeus slew Semelê with his lightning before she could give birth to her child was his desire that the babe should be born, not of a mortal woman but of two immortals, and thus should be immortal from its very birth.
18. Horace, Sermones, 1.7.17-1.7.18, 1.7.32 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

19. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4.1-4.41, 4.389-4.415, 6.125 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

20. Strabo, Geography, 10.3.16 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10.3.16. Also resembling these rites are the Cotytian and the Bendideian rites practiced among the Thracians, among whom the Orphic rites had their beginning. Now the Cotys who is worshipped among the Edonians, and also the instruments used in her rites, are mentioned by Aeschylus; for he says,O adorable Cotys among the Edonians, and ye who hold mountain-ranging instruments; and he mentions immediately afterwards the attendants of Dionysus: one, holding in his hands the bombyces, toilsome work of the turner's chisel, fills full the fingered melody, the call that brings on frenzy, while another causes to resound the bronze-bound cotylae and again,stringed instruments raise their shrill cry, and frightful mimickers from some place unseen bellow like bulls, and the semblance of drums, as of subterranean thunder, rolls along, a terrifying sound; for these rites resemble the Phrygian rites, and it is at least not unlikely that, just as the Phrygians themselves were colonists from Thrace, so also their sacred rites were borrowed from there. Also when they identify Dionysus and the Edonian Lycurgus, they hint at the homogeneity of their sacred rites.
21. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 2.2.2, 3.5.1-3.5.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.2.2. καὶ γίνεται Ἀκρισίῳ μὲν ἐξ Εὐρυδίκης τῆς Λακεδαίμονος Δανάη, Προίτῳ δὲ ἐκ Σθενεβοίας Λυσίππη καὶ Ἰφινόη καὶ Ἰφιάνασσα. αὗται δὲ ὡς ἐτελειώθησαν, ἐμάνησαν, ὡς μὲν Ἡσίοδός φησιν, ὅτι τὰς Διονύσου τελετὰς οὐ κατεδέχοντο, ὡς δὲ Ἀκουσίλαος λέγει, διότι τὸ τῆς Ἥρας ξόανον ἐξηυτέλισαν. γενόμεναι δὲ ἐμμανεῖς ἐπλανῶντο ἀνὰ τὴν Ἀργείαν ἅπασαν, αὖθις δὲ τὴν Ἀρκαδίαν καὶ τὴν Πελοπόννησον 1 -- διελθοῦσαι μετʼ ἀκοσμίας ἁπάσης διὰ τῆς ἐρημίας ἐτρόχαζον. Μελάμπους δὲ ὁ Ἀμυθάονος καὶ Εἰδομένης τῆς Ἄβαντος, μάντις ὢν καὶ τὴν διὰ φαρμάκων καὶ καθαρμῶν θεραπείαν πρῶτος εὑρηκώς, ὑπισχνεῖται θεραπεύειν τὰς παρθένους, εἰ λάβοι τὸ τρίτον μέρος τῆς δυναστείας. οὐκ ἐπιτρέποντος δὲ Προίτου θεραπεύειν ἐπὶ μισθοῖς τηλικούτοις, ἔτι μᾶλλον ἐμαίνοντο αἱ παρθένοι καὶ προσέτι μετὰ τούτων αἱ λοιπαὶ γυναῖκες· καὶ γὰρ αὗται τὰς οἰκίας ἀπολιποῦσαι τοὺς ἰδίους ἀπώλλυον παῖδας καὶ εἰς τὴν ἐρημίαν ἐφοίτων. προβαινούσης δὲ ἐπὶ πλεῖστον τῆς συμφορᾶς, τοὺς αἰτηθέντας μισθοὺς ὁ Προῖτος ἐδίδου. ὁ δὲ ὑπέσχετο θεραπεύειν ὅταν ἕτερον τοσοῦτον τῆς γῆς ὁ ἀδελφὸς αὐτοῦ λάβῃ Βίας. Προῖτος δὲ εὐλαβηθεὶς μὴ βραδυνούσης τῆς θεραπείας αἰτηθείη καὶ πλεῖον, θεραπεύειν συνεχώρησεν ἐπὶ τούτοις. Μελάμπους δὲ παραλαβὼν τοὺς δυνατωτάτους τῶν νεανιῶν μετʼ ἀλαλαγμοῦ καί τινος ἐνθέου χορείας ἐκ τῶν ὀρῶν αὐτὰς εἰς Σικυῶνα συνεδίωξε. κατὰ δὲ τὸν διωγμὸν ἡ πρεσβυτάτη τῶν θυγατέρων Ἰφινόη μετήλλαξεν· ταῖς δὲ λοιπαῖς τυχούσαις καθαρμῶν σωφρονῆσαι συνέβη. καὶ ταύτας μὲν ἐξέδοτο Προῖτος Μελάμποδι καὶ Βίαντι, παῖδα δʼ ὕστερον ἐγέννησε Μεγαπένθην. 3.5.1. Διόνυσος δὲ εὑρετὴς ἀμπέλου γενόμενος, Ἥρας μανίαν αὐτῷ ἐμβαλούσης περιπλανᾶται Αἴγυπτόν τε καὶ Συρίαν. καὶ τὸ μὲν πρῶτον Πρωτεὺς αὐτὸν ὑποδέχεται βασιλεὺς Αἰγυπτίων, αὖθις δὲ εἰς Κύβελα τῆς Φρυγίας ἀφικνεῖται, κἀκεῖ καθαρθεὶς ὑπὸ Ῥέας καὶ τὰς τελετὰς ἐκμαθών, καὶ λαβὼν παρʼ ἐκείνης τὴν στολήν, ἐπὶ Ἰνδοὺς 1 -- διὰ τῆς Θράκης ἠπείγετο. Λυκοῦργος δὲ παῖς Δρύαντος, Ἠδωνῶν βασιλεύων, οἳ Στρυμόνα ποταμὸν παροικοῦσι, πρῶτος ὑβρίσας ἐξέβαλεν αὐτόν. καὶ Διόνυσος μὲν εἰς θάλασσαν πρὸς Θέτιν τὴν Νηρέως κατέφυγε, Βάκχαι δὲ ἐγένοντο αἰχμάλωτοι καὶ τὸ συνεπόμενον Σατύρων πλῆθος αὐτῷ. αὖθις δὲ αἱ Βάκχαι ἐλύθησαν ἐξαίφνης, Λυκούργῳ δὲ μανίαν ἐνεποίησε 2 -- Διόνυσος. ὁ δὲ μεμηνὼς Δρύαντα τὸν παῖδα, ἀμπέλου νομίζων κλῆμα κόπτειν, πελέκει πλήξας ἀπέκτεινε, καὶ ἀκρωτηριάσας αὐτὸν ἐσωφρόνησε. 1 -- τῆς δὲ γῆς ἀκάρπου μενούσης, ἔχρησεν ὁ θεὸς καρποφορήσειν αὐτήν, ἂν θανατωθῇ Λυκοῦργος. Ἠδωνοὶ δὲ ἀκούσαντες εἰς τὸ Παγγαῖον αὐτὸν ἀπαγαγόντες ὄρος ἔδησαν, κἀκεῖ κατὰ Διονύσου βούλησιν ὑπὸ ἵππων διαφθαρεὶς ἀπέθανε. 3.5.2. διελθὼν δὲ Θρᾴκην καὶ τὴν Ἰνδικὴν ἅπασαν, στήλας ἐκεῖ στήσας 1 -- ἧκεν εἰς Θήβας, καὶ τὰς γυναῖκας ἠνάγκασε καταλιπούσας τὰς οἰκίας βακχεύειν ἐν τῷ Κιθαιρῶνι. Πενθεὺς δὲ γεννηθεὶς ἐξ Ἀγαυῆς Ἐχίονι, παρὰ Κάδμου εἰληφὼς τὴν βασιλείαν, διεκώλυε ταῦτα γίνεσθαι, καὶ παραγενόμενος εἰς Κιθαιρῶνα τῶν Βακχῶν κατάσκοπος ὑπὸ τῆς μητρὸς Ἀγαυῆς κατὰ μανίαν ἐμελίσθη· ἐνόμισε γὰρ αὐτὸν θηρίον εἶναι. δείξας δὲ Θηβαίοις ὅτι θεός ἐστιν, ἧκεν εἰς Ἄργος, κἀκεῖ 2 -- πάλιν οὐ τιμώντων αὐτὸν ἐξέμηνε τὰς γυναῖκας. αἱ δὲ ἐν τοῖς ὄρεσι τοὺς ἐπιμαστιδίους ἔχουσαι 3 -- παῖδας τὰς σάρκας αὐτῶν ἐσιτοῦντο.
22. New Testament, Matthew, 28.16-28.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

28.16. But the eleven disciples went into Galilee, to the mountain where Jesus had sent them. 28.17. When they saw him, they bowed down to him, but some doubted. 28.18. Jesus came to them and spoke to them, saying, "All authority has been given to me in heaven and on earth. 28.19. Go, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit 28.20. teaching them to observe all things which I commanded you. Behold, I am with you always, even to the end of the age." Amen.
23. Plutarch, Camillus, 5.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.2. From the sacred rites used in the worship of this goddess, she might be held to be almost identical with Leucothea. The women bring a serving-maid into the sanctuary and beat her with rods, then drive her forth again; they embrace their nephews and nieces in preference to their own children; and their conduct at the sacrifice resembles that of the nurses of Dionysus, or that of Ino under the afflictions put upon her by her husband’s concubine. After his vows, Camillus invaded the country of the Faliscans and conquered them in a great battle, together with the Capenates who came up to their aid.
24. Aelian, Varia Historia, 3.42 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

25. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 45.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

26. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.20.4, 2.22.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.20.4. The tomb near this they call that of the maenad Chorea, saying that she was one of the women who joined Dionysus in his expedition against Argos, and that Perseus, being victorious in the battle, put most of the women to the sword. To the rest they gave a common grave, but to Chorea they gave burial apart because of her high rank. 2.22.1. The temple of Hera Anthea (Flowery) is on the right of the sanctuary of Leto, and before it is a grave of women. They were killed in a battle against the Argives under Perseus, having come from the Aegean Islands to help Dionysus in war; for which reason they are surnamed Haliae (Women of the Sea). Facing the tomb of the women is a sanctuary of Demeter, surnamed Pelasgian from Pelasgus, son of Triopas, its founder, and not far from the sanctuary is the grave of Pelasgus.
27. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 21.26-21.92, 21.118-21.123, 21.155-21.169 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, mênis of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 107
achilles/akhilleus Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 81
achilles Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 20, 21, 22, 24
actaeon Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 19; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 208
action, taken by heroines Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 113
adrestos Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 45
aeneas de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 107
aeschylus, aeschylean (dionysiac) tetralogies/plays Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 10, 90
aeschylus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 10
aetiological myths/aetia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111
agamemnon Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 81; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 107
agave Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 99, 110
alcohol, drunkenness Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 22, 25
altar Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56
ambrosia (the nymph) Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 26, 56
amphion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 208
and n Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 108, 113
andromache Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 99
animals Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 81
antagonism, divine, and cult Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 71
antigone Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 44; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 172
antigone (sophocles), and secondary myths Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 172
antimachos Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 45
aphrodite Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 10; Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 81; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 81
apollo, apollonian, apolline Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 150
apollo Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 42, 65, 126, 150; Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 81; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 107
apollodorus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 9, 10
apotheosis Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 108
arabia Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56, 58, 184
archaic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
ares Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 10, 22, 65
argos (dog) Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 81
ariadne Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 16; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 10
aristeia(i) Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 82, 83
artemis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 10, 111
as father of heroes Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 80
askos (the giant) Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 58
asopus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 12
atalanta Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 71
athena Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 81; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 107
bacchants, bacchae, bacchai Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
bacchants, maenads Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 65, 150
bacchiad family Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 13
bacchiadae Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 208
bassaras, bassarides, bassarae Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 150
bassarids Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 83
beatus Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 4
bellerophon Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 10, 11
boeotia, boeotian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 208
boundaries, crossing of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 80, 108
boutes Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 26
brehch, α. Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 71
brutus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 113
burkert, w. Alexiou and Cairns, Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After (2017) 50
butes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
cadmus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 90, 110
calame, c Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 113
calypso/ kalypso Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 81
cannibal, cannibalism Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 83
captivity/imprisonment/enslavement Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 93
cassandra Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 150
cave Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
characterization de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 107
charops Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 65
child Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 13, 24
chorus (male, female), of a. trophoi or dionysou trophoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 85
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
circe/kirke Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 81
city dionysia Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 13
concepts/values/beliefs Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 90, 111
corinth, corinthian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 150, 208
cotys Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 110
creon Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 44
croesus Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 4
cross-exploration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 90
cult, and divine antagonism Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 71
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 150, 161, 303
cult-establishment/foundation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 90, 93, 99, 110, 111
cybele Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 110
damascus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 58, 184
danaë Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 172
destiny Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 172
diomedes Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 16, 17; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 150, 208; Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 45; Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 10
dionysism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 150
dionysos, and heroines Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 108, 113
dionysos, and lykourgos Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 80, 81; Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 13
dionysos, and mortality Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 108
dionysos, arrival Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos, awakening Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 123, 161
dionysos, death of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 108
dionysos, dionysos bromios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
dionysos, dionysos mainomenos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 123
dionysos, dionysos xenos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
dionysos, nurse of Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 123, 124, 150, 161, 283
dionysos, punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161, 283, 303
dionysos, rebirth Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 123
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 123, 124, 150, 161, 208, 283, 303
dionysus, ambiguities/polarities of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 99
dionysus, and hēsychia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111
dionysus, and the maenads Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 99
dionysus, anthropomorphism of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 99
dionysus, effeminate/effeminacy of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 9, 10
dionysus, epiphanies/theophany of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 9, 10
dionysus, in antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 172
dionysus, persona (aspects of) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 90
dionysus, tripartite nature of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 99
dionysus, union with Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 93
dismemberment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 123, 124, 150, 161
distance Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 81
divine status Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 42, 56, 58
divinity, central attributes Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 4
drama Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 4
dryas Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 123, 150, 208, 283; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 9
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
edonoi Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 150, 283
eleusis/eleusinian mysteries Jeong, Pauline Baptism among the Mysteries: Ritual Messages and the Promise of Initiation (2023) 84
emotions, anger/rage de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 107
enargeia Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 83
entheos ἔνθεος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
epic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
epic parody and allusion Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 113
epicurus, epicureanism Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 113
epinician Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 10
eumelus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 9
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 10, 90, 110
euripides, exodos (missing part/lacuna) of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 110
euripides, hippolytus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 110
euripides, skiron Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 85
euripides Jeong, Pauline Baptism among the Mysteries: Ritual Messages and the Promise of Initiation (2023) 84; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 90
europa Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 13
europa character Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 208
eurynome Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 12, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 208
evidence (of aeschylus dionysiac tetralogies), mythographic Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 9, 10, 90
eyes, eyesight, blindness Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 18, 19, 56, 65, 126, 150
fear Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 17
fire Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
flute Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
frenzy, mania, madness Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 13, 17, 83, 150
galateia Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 18
gastronomy Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 113
gender, and immortality Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 108
gift Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 7, 11, 20, 23, 24, 25
glaucus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 16, 17; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 150, 208; Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 10
glaukos Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 45
gods, as distinct from heroes Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 71, 80, 81
gods, as parents of mortals Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 81, 113
great dionysia, city dionysia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
happiness Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 4
heaven, heavenly Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 123
hector Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 11; Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 45; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 107
helen Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 45
hellenistic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
hephaestus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27
hephaistos Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 108
hera Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 12, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 56; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 208; Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 108; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 107
heracles Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 23, 24; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 123
hermes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 124
heroes, zeus and Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 80
heroines, actions of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 113
heroines, and dionysos Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 108, 113
heroism, and transgression Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 71, 80
hippolochos Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 45
homer Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 113; Jeong, Pauline Baptism among the Mysteries: Ritual Messages and the Promise of Initiation (2023) 84; Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 13; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 9, 10, 93, 99, 111
homeric Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 150
homeric hymns, to dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 10, 93
horse Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 43
hubris Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 110, 111
hunting Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 13
hyades Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 25
hyakinthos Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 71
hēsychia/calm life/quietism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111
ikanos Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 113
iliad (homer), and sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 172
immortality, and gender Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 108
immortality, of the gods Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 4
immortality Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 4, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 27, 43, 56, 58
imprisonment, captivity Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56
imprisonment, of antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 172
initiands/initiates/initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 93
initiation/rite of passage Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 42, 56, 65
ino-leukothea Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 108
ino Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
inspiration Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 150
interrogation (-scene) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 9
ion, omphale Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 85
ithaca/ithaka Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 81
ivy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
kadmos, kadmeian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 208, 303
kamerbeek, j. c Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 71
katabasis κατάβασις, of orpheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 150
katabasis κατάβασις Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 150
kedalion Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 24
killing, intrafamilial Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 13
kotys Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 33
kronos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 123
kybeloi (in phrygia) Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 12
kêdos Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 45
landmarks Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 81
laughter, gods Alexiou and Cairns, Greek Laughter and Tears: Antiquity and After (2017) 50
lemnos Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 23
lexicographers Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 85
lucilius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 113
lycurgeia, the Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 172
lycurgus, and pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 10, 90, 93, 99, 110, 111
lycurgus, in antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 172
lycurgus, myth of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 9, 10
lycurgus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 123, 124, 150, 208, 283, 303; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 85
lycurgus (another mythical figure) Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 43
lykourgos Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 71, 80, 81, 108, 113; Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 13
lyssa/fury Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 184
lyssa Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 99
madness Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
madness (mania)/frenzy, and lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 9
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 10, 93, 99
maenad-nymphs Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
maenads, maenadic, maenadism, rites/cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 123, 161, 283
maenads/maenadism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 99
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
manliness Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 10
marriage Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 113
massenzio, m. Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 113
medea Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 85
melitaia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
menelaus Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 45
messengers/messenger-speech Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 99, 111
minyades Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 113
minyads, daughters of minyas psoloeis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
mortality, and dionysos Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 108
mountains Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 126; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 150
muses Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 65; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
mysteries, mystery cults, bacchic, dionysiac Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 208
mysteries, mystery cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 208
mystery Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111
mystery cult Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 123, 161, 283, 303
myths, and sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 172
myths, secondary Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 172
naxos Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 184
nestor Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 45
nurses Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 108, 113
nurses of dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 9, 10, 85
nymph Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161, 283
nymphs, cave of Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 81
nysa, nyseion, nysion Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56, 65, 184
nysa, nyseion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 123, 150, 161
odysseus Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 81; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 107
oeagrus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 65
oeta Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 123
oikos, disruption of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 90, 110
olbia Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 19, 20
olympia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 124
oracle Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 126, 150
orchard Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 81
orion Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 71
orpheus, death Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 150
orpheus, katabasis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 150
orpheus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 65, 83, 211; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 150, 303
orphism Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 108
ox-goad βουπλήξ Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 123, 124
palace Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 150
panathenaia Seaford, Tragedy, Ritual and Money in Ancient Greece: Selected Essays (2018) 13
panegyric Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 113
pangaion Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 184
pantheon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
paris/alexander of troy de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 107
paris Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 45
patroclus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 20
pattern (plot/thematic) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 90, 111
pease, s. α. Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 80
peisandros Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 45
penelope Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 81
pentheus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 19; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 124, 303; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 90, 99, 110, 111
performance Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
perseus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 15; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303; Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 80, 108
philoctetes Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 71
philolaos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 208
philotês Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 45
pholos Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 23, 24
phronēsis Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111
phrygia, phrygian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 208
phrygia Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 2, 58, 211
pieros Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 65
piety, of antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 172
polis, cohesion/coherence of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 111
polis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 10
polyphemus, cyclops de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 107
polyphemus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 18
poseidon Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 56; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 107
pottery Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 161
priam de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 107
privitera, g. α. Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 71, 108
procession Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
proetids, daughters of proetus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
proitides Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 113
punishment Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 27; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 124, 161, 283
purification Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 208
ransom Liatsi, Ethics in Ancient Greek Literature: Aspects of Ethical Reasoning from Homer to Aristotle and Beyond (2021) 45