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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6677
Homer, Iliad, 4.279


ῥίγησέν τε ἰδών, ὑπό τε σπέος ἤλασε μῆλα·these were arming them for battle, and a cloud of footmen followed with them. Even as when from some place of outlook a goatherd seeth a cloud coming over the face of the deep before the blast of the West Wind, and to him being afar off it seemeth blacker than pitch as it passeth over the face of the deep, and it bringeth a mighty whirlwind; and he shuddereth at sight of it, and driveth his flock beneath a cave;


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.459-2.463, 3.12, 4.275-4.278, 4.455, 5.87-5.92, 5.522-5.526, 5.770-5.772, 6.506-6.511, 8.555-8.559, 16.765-16.770, 19.362-19.363 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.459. /Even as a consuming fire maketh a boundless forest to blaze on the peaks of a mountain, and from afar is the glare thereof to be seen, even so from their innumerable bronze, as they marched forth, went the dazzling gleam up through the sky unto the heavens. And as the many tribes of winged fowl 2.460. /wild geese or cranes or long-necked swans on the Asian mead by the streams of Caystrius, fly this way and that, glorying in their strength of wing, and with loud cries settle ever onwards, and the mead resoundeth; even so their many tribes poured forth from ships and huts 2.461. /wild geese or cranes or long-necked swans on the Asian mead by the streams of Caystrius, fly this way and that, glorying in their strength of wing, and with loud cries settle ever onwards, and the mead resoundeth; even so their many tribes poured forth from ships and huts 2.462. /wild geese or cranes or long-necked swans on the Asian mead by the streams of Caystrius, fly this way and that, glorying in their strength of wing, and with loud cries settle ever onwards, and the mead resoundeth; even so their many tribes poured forth from ships and huts 2.463. /wild geese or cranes or long-necked swans on the Asian mead by the streams of Caystrius, fly this way and that, glorying in their strength of wing, and with loud cries settle ever onwards, and the mead resoundeth; even so their many tribes poured forth from ships and huts 4.275. /these were arming them for battle, and a cloud of footmen followed with them. Even as when from some place of outlook a goatherd seeth a cloud coming over the face of the deep before the blast of the West Wind, and to him being afar off it seemeth blacker than pitch as it passeth over the face of the deep, and it bringeth a mighty whirlwind; and he shuddereth at sight of it, and driveth his flock beneath a cave; 4.276. /these were arming them for battle, and a cloud of footmen followed with them. Even as when from some place of outlook a goatherd seeth a cloud coming over the face of the deep before the blast of the West Wind, and to him being afar off it seemeth blacker than pitch as it passeth over the face of the deep, and it bringeth a mighty whirlwind; and he shuddereth at sight of it, and driveth his flock beneath a cave; 4.277. /these were arming them for battle, and a cloud of footmen followed with them. Even as when from some place of outlook a goatherd seeth a cloud coming over the face of the deep before the blast of the West Wind, and to him being afar off it seemeth blacker than pitch as it passeth over the face of the deep, and it bringeth a mighty whirlwind; and he shuddereth at sight of it, and driveth his flock beneath a cave; 4.278. /these were arming them for battle, and a cloud of footmen followed with them. Even as when from some place of outlook a goatherd seeth a cloud coming over the face of the deep before the blast of the West Wind, and to him being afar off it seemeth blacker than pitch as it passeth over the face of the deep, and it bringeth a mighty whirlwind; and he shuddereth at sight of it, and driveth his flock beneath a cave; 4.455. /and far off amid the mountains the shepherd heareth the thunder thereof; even so from the joining of these in battle came shouting and toil.Antilochus was first to slay a warrior of the Trojans in full armour, a goodly man amid the foremost fighters, Echepolus, son of Thalysius. Him was he first to smite upon the horn of his helmet with crest of horse-hair 5.87. /but of Tydeus' son couldst thou not have told with which host of the twain he was joined, whether it was with the Trojans that he had fellowship or with the Achaeans. For he stormed across the plain like unto a winter torrent at the full, that with its swift flood sweeps away the embankments; this the close-fenced embankments hold not back 5.88. /but of Tydeus' son couldst thou not have told with which host of the twain he was joined, whether it was with the Trojans that he had fellowship or with the Achaeans. For he stormed across the plain like unto a winter torrent at the full, that with its swift flood sweeps away the embankments; this the close-fenced embankments hold not back 5.89. /but of Tydeus' son couldst thou not have told with which host of the twain he was joined, whether it was with the Trojans that he had fellowship or with the Achaeans. For he stormed across the plain like unto a winter torrent at the full, that with its swift flood sweeps away the embankments; this the close-fenced embankments hold not back 5.90. /neither do the walls of the fruitful vineyards stay its sudden coming when the rain of Zeus driveth it on; and before it in multitudes the fair works of men fall in ruin. Even in such wise before Tydeus' son were the thick battalions of the Trojans driven in rout, nor might they abide him for all they were so many. 5.91. /neither do the walls of the fruitful vineyards stay its sudden coming when the rain of Zeus driveth it on; and before it in multitudes the fair works of men fall in ruin. Even in such wise before Tydeus' son were the thick battalions of the Trojans driven in rout, nor might they abide him for all they were so many. 5.92. /neither do the walls of the fruitful vineyards stay its sudden coming when the rain of Zeus driveth it on; and before it in multitudes the fair works of men fall in ruin. Even in such wise before Tydeus' son were the thick battalions of the Trojans driven in rout, nor might they abide him for all they were so many. 5.522. /roused the Danaans to fight; yet these even of themselves quailed not before the Trojans' violence and their onsets, but stood their ground like mists that in still weather the son of Cronos setteth on the mountain-tops moveless, what time the might of the North Wind sleepeth and of the other furious winds 5.523. /roused the Danaans to fight; yet these even of themselves quailed not before the Trojans' violence and their onsets, but stood their ground like mists that in still weather the son of Cronos setteth on the mountain-tops moveless, what time the might of the North Wind sleepeth and of the other furious winds 5.524. /roused the Danaans to fight; yet these even of themselves quailed not before the Trojans' violence and their onsets, but stood their ground like mists that in still weather the son of Cronos setteth on the mountain-tops moveless, what time the might of the North Wind sleepeth and of the other furious winds 5.525. /that blow with shrill blasts and scatter this way and that the shadowy clouds; even so the Danaans withstood the Trojans steadfastly, and fled not. And the son of Atreus ranged throughout the throng with many a word of command:My friends, be men, and take to you hearts of valour, and have shame each of the other in the fierce conflict. of men that have shame more are saved than are slain, but from them that flee cometh neither glory nor any avail. 5.526. /that blow with shrill blasts and scatter this way and that the shadowy clouds; even so the Danaans withstood the Trojans steadfastly, and fled not. And the son of Atreus ranged throughout the throng with many a word of command:My friends, be men, and take to you hearts of valour, and have shame each of the other in the fierce conflict. of men that have shame more are saved than are slain, but from them that flee cometh neither glory nor any avail. 5.770. /As far as a man seeth with his eyes into the haze of distance as he sitteth on a place of outlook and gazeth over the wine-dark deep, even so far do the loud-neighing horses of the gods spring at a bound. But when they were come to the land of Troy and the two flowing rivers, where the Simoïs and Scamander join their streams 5.771. /As far as a man seeth with his eyes into the haze of distance as he sitteth on a place of outlook and gazeth over the wine-dark deep, even so far do the loud-neighing horses of the gods spring at a bound. But when they were come to the land of Troy and the two flowing rivers, where the Simoïs and Scamander join their streams 5.772. /As far as a man seeth with his eyes into the haze of distance as he sitteth on a place of outlook and gazeth over the wine-dark deep, even so far do the loud-neighing horses of the gods spring at a bound. But when they were come to the land of Troy and the two flowing rivers, where the Simoïs and Scamander join their streams 6.506. /and hastened through the city, trusting in his fleetness of foot. Even as when a stalled horse that has fed his fill at the manger breaketh his halter and runneth stamping over the plain—being wont to bathe him in the fair-flowing river—and exulteth; on high doth he hold his head, and about his shoulders 6.507. /and hastened through the city, trusting in his fleetness of foot. Even as when a stalled horse that has fed his fill at the manger breaketh his halter and runneth stamping over the plain—being wont to bathe him in the fair-flowing river—and exulteth; on high doth he hold his head, and about his shoulders 6.508. /and hastened through the city, trusting in his fleetness of foot. Even as when a stalled horse that has fed his fill at the manger breaketh his halter and runneth stamping over the plain—being wont to bathe him in the fair-flowing river—and exulteth; on high doth he hold his head, and about his shoulders 6.509. /and hastened through the city, trusting in his fleetness of foot. Even as when a stalled horse that has fed his fill at the manger breaketh his halter and runneth stamping over the plain—being wont to bathe him in the fair-flowing river—and exulteth; on high doth he hold his head, and about his shoulders 6.510. /his mane floateth streaming, and as he glorieth in his splendour, his knees nimbly bear him to the haunts and pastures of mares; even so Paris, son of Priam, strode down from high Pergamus, all gleaming in his armour like the shining sun, laughing for glee, and his swift feet bare him on. Speedily then 6.511. /his mane floateth streaming, and as he glorieth in his splendour, his knees nimbly bear him to the haunts and pastures of mares; even so Paris, son of Priam, strode down from high Pergamus, all gleaming in his armour like the shining sun, laughing for glee, and his swift feet bare him on. Speedily then 8.555. /Even as in heaven about the gleaming moon the stars shine clear, when the air is windless, and forth to view appear all mountain peaks and high headlands and glades, and from heaven breaketh open the infinite air, and all stars are seen, and the shepherd joyeth in his heart; 8.556. /Even as in heaven about the gleaming moon the stars shine clear, when the air is windless, and forth to view appear all mountain peaks and high headlands and glades, and from heaven breaketh open the infinite air, and all stars are seen, and the shepherd joyeth in his heart; 8.557. /Even as in heaven about the gleaming moon the stars shine clear, when the air is windless, and forth to view appear all mountain peaks and high headlands and glades, and from heaven breaketh open the infinite air, and all stars are seen, and the shepherd joyeth in his heart; 8.558. /Even as in heaven about the gleaming moon the stars shine clear, when the air is windless, and forth to view appear all mountain peaks and high headlands and glades, and from heaven breaketh open the infinite air, and all stars are seen, and the shepherd joyeth in his heart; 8.559. /Even as in heaven about the gleaming moon the stars shine clear, when the air is windless, and forth to view appear all mountain peaks and high headlands and glades, and from heaven breaketh open the infinite air, and all stars are seen, and the shepherd joyeth in his heart; 16.765. /And as the East Wind and the South strive with one another in shaking a deep wood in the glades of a mountain,—a wood of beech and ash and smooth-barked cornel, and these dash one against the other their long boughs with a wondrous din, and there is a crashing of broken branches; 16.766. /And as the East Wind and the South strive with one another in shaking a deep wood in the glades of a mountain,—a wood of beech and ash and smooth-barked cornel, and these dash one against the other their long boughs with a wondrous din, and there is a crashing of broken branches; 16.767. /And as the East Wind and the South strive with one another in shaking a deep wood in the glades of a mountain,—a wood of beech and ash and smooth-barked cornel, and these dash one against the other their long boughs with a wondrous din, and there is a crashing of broken branches; 16.768. /And as the East Wind and the South strive with one another in shaking a deep wood in the glades of a mountain,—a wood of beech and ash and smooth-barked cornel, and these dash one against the other their long boughs with a wondrous din, and there is a crashing of broken branches; 16.769. /And as the East Wind and the South strive with one another in shaking a deep wood in the glades of a mountain,—a wood of beech and ash and smooth-barked cornel, and these dash one against the other their long boughs with a wondrous din, and there is a crashing of broken branches; 16.770. /even so the Trojans and Achaeans leapt one upon another and made havoc, nor would either side take thought of ruinous flight. And round about Cebriones many sharp spears were fixed, and many winged arrows that leapt from the bow-string, and many great stones smote against shields, as men fought around him. 19.362. /and the bossed shields, the corselets with massive plates, and the ashen spears. And the gleam thereof went up to heaven, and all the earth round about laughed by reason of the flashing of bronze; and there went up a din from beneath the feet of men; and in their midst goodly Achilles arrayed him for battle. 19.363. /and the bossed shields, the corselets with massive plates, and the ashen spears. And the gleam thereof went up to heaven, and all the earth round about laughed by reason of the flashing of bronze; and there went up a din from beneath the feet of men; and in their midst goodly Achilles arrayed him for battle.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 5.291-5.296, 6.13-6.41, 6.139-6.140, 6.229-6.235, 7.14-7.17, 7.19-7.79, 7.140, 9.391-9.393 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aratus Solensis, Phaenomena, 11-12, 265-266, 408-419, 423-435, 732, 741-743, 768-772, 10 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

10. αὐτὸς γὰρ τά γε σήματʼ ἐν οὐρανῷ ἐστήριξεν
4. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.271-1.276, 1.280-1.294, 1.471-1.482, 2.325-2.327, 3.832-3.842, 3.1025-3.1044, 5.195-5.234, 5.1074-5.1075, 5.1078-5.1082, 6.96-6.101, 6.108, 6.131-6.159, 6.170, 6.191-6.193, 6.253-6.257, 6.306-6.308, 6.357-6.378, 6.442, 6.461, 6.691, 6.1142-6.1143 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Ovid, Tristia, 1.2.19-1.2.26 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.81-1.123 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.81. allays their fury and their rage confines. 1.82. Did he not so, our ocean, earth, and sky 1.83. were whirled before them through the vast ie. 1.84. But over-ruling Jove, of this in fear 1.85. hid them in dungeon dark: then o'er them piled 1.86. huge mountains, and ordained a lawful king 1.87. to hold them in firm sway, or know what time 1.88. with Jove's consent, to loose them o'er the world. 1.90. “Thou in whose hands the Father of all gods 1.91. and Sovereign of mankind confides the power 1.92. to calm the waters or with winds upturn 1.93. great Aeolus! a race with me at war 1.94. now sails the Tuscan main towards Italy 1.95. bringing their Ilium and its vanquished powers. 1.96. Uprouse thy gales. Strike that proud navy down! 1.97. Hurl far and wide, and strew the waves with dead! 1.98. Twice seven nymphs are mine, of rarest mould; 1.99. of whom Deiopea, the most fair 1.100. I give thee in true wedlock for thine own 1.101. to mate thy noble worth; she at thy side 1.102. hall pass long, happy years, and fruitful bring 1.104. Then Aeolus: “'T is thy sole task, O Queen 1.105. to weigh thy wish and will. My fealty 1.106. thy high behest obeys. This humble throne 1.107. is of thy gift. Thy smiles for me obtain 1.108. authority from Jove. Thy grace concedes 1.109. my station at your bright Olympian board 1.111. Replying thus, he smote with spear reversed 1.112. the hollow mountain's wall; then rush the winds 1.113. through that wide breach in long, embattled line 1.114. and sweep tumultuous from land to land: 1.115. with brooding pinions o'er the waters spread 1.116. east wind and south, and boisterous Afric gale 1.117. upturn the sea; vast billows shoreward roll; 1.118. the shout of mariners, the creak of cordage 1.119. follow the shock; low-hanging clouds conceal 1.120. from Trojan eyes all sight of heaven and day; 1.121. night o'er the ocean broods; from sky to sky 1.122. the thunders roll, the ceaseless lightnings glare; 1.123. and all things mean swift death for mortal man.
7. Vergil, Georgics, 1.316-1.334, 1.353, 1.489, 2.303-2.314, 3.219-3.241, 4.488, 4.538-4.553 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.316. And when the first breath of his panting steed 1.317. On us the Orient flings, that hour with them 1.318. Red Vesper 'gins to trim his 'lated fires. 1.319. Hence under doubtful skies forebode we can 1.320. The coming tempests, hence both harvest-day 1.321. And seed-time, when to smite the treacherous main 1.322. With driving oars, when launch the fair-rigged fleet 1.323. Or in ripe hour to fell the forest-pine. 1.324. Hence, too, not idly do we watch the stars— 1.325. Their rising and their setting-and the year 1.326. Four varying seasons to one law conformed. 1.327. If chilly showers e'er shut the farmer's door 1.328. Much that had soon with sunshine cried for haste 1.329. He may forestall; the ploughman batters keen 1.330. His blunted share's hard tooth, scoops from a tree 1.331. His troughs, or on the cattle stamps a brand 1.332. Or numbers on the corn-heaps; some make sharp 1.333. The stakes and two-pronged forks, and willow-band 1.334. Amerian for the bending vine prepare. 1.353. The gates of heaven; thrice, sooth to say, they strove 1.489. Now duck their head beneath the wave, now run 2.303. Barren for fruits, by tilth untamable 2.304. Nor grape her kind, nor apples their good name 2.305. Maintaining—will in this wise yield thee proof: 2.306. Stout osier-baskets from the rafter-smoke 2.307. And strainers of the winepress pluck thee down; 2.308. Hereinto let that evil land, with fresh 2.309. Spring-water mixed, be trampled to the full; 2.310. The moisture, mark you, will ooze all away 2.311. In big drops issuing through the osier-withes 2.312. But plainly will its taste the secret tell 2.313. And with a harsh twang ruefully distort 2.314. The mouths of them that try it. Rich soil again 3.219. But if fierce squadrons and the ranks of war 3.220. Delight thee rather, or on wheels to glide 3.221. At placeName key= 3.222. And in the grove of Jupiter urge on 3.223. The flying chariot, be your steed's first task 3.224. To face the warrior's armed rage, and brook 3.225. The trumpet, and long roar of rumbling wheels 3.226. And clink of chiming bridles in the stall; 3.227. Then more and more to love his master's voice 3.228. Caressing, or loud hand that claps his neck. 3.229. Ay, thus far let him learn to dare, when first 3.230. Weaned from his mother, and his mouth at time 3.231. Yield to the supple halter, even while yet 3.232. Weak, tottering-limbed, and ignorant of life. 3.233. But, three years ended, when the fourth arrives 3.234. Now let him tarry not to run the ring 3.235. With rhythmic hoof-beat echoing, and now learn 3.236. Alternately to curve each bending leg 3.237. And be like one that struggleth; then at last 3.238. Challenge the winds to race him, and at speed 3.239. Launched through the open, like a reinless thing 3.240. Scarce print his footsteps on the surface-sand. 3.241. As when with power from Hyperborean clime 4.488. “Take beakers of Maconian wine,” she said 4.538. Behind a rock's huge barrier, Proteus hides. 4.539. Here in close covert out of the sun's eye 4.540. The youth she places, and herself the while 4.541. Swathed in a shadowy mist stands far aloof. 4.542. And now the ravening dog-star that burns up 4.543. The thirsty Indians blazed in heaven; his course 4.544. The fiery sun had half devoured: the blade 4.545. Were parched, and the void streams with droughty jaw 4.546. Baked to their mud-beds by the scorching ray 4.547. When Proteus seeking his accustomed cave 4.548. Strode from the billows: round him frolicking 4.549. The watery folk that people the waste sea 4.550. Sprinkled the bitter brine-dew far and wide. 4.551. Along the shore in scattered groups to feed 4.552. The sea-calves stretch them: while the seer himself 4.553. Like herdsman on the hills when evening bid
8. Lucan, Pharsalia, 5.597-5.677 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Seneca The Younger, Agamemnon, 466-497, 465 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 37.1, 41.1, 48.18 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Philostratus The Athenian, Lives of The Sophists, 2.9 (2nd cent. CE



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ajax Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237
anthropocentrism Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 43
apollo Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
aratus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 68
aristaeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 260
aristides Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
asclepius Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
athena Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
black sea, landscape Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 37
cabiri Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
cattle Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 260
caves Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 37, 43, 44
corybantes Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
cult, mystery cult Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
cult Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
cyrene Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 260
democritus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237
diomedes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237
dream Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237
faustina Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
fear Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 37, 44
floods Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 44, 326
goats Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 37, 44
gods, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 68
gods Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
hector Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 326
hera Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 43, 44
homer, iliad Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 37, 43, 44
homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 68, 237
homeric hymn to pan Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 37
homeric similes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237, 260
imagery, military Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 68, 237, 260
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 68
lightning Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 44
longinus Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 44
lucretius, gods in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237
lucretius, natura in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237
lucretius, war in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237
marcus aurelius Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
mist Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 37, 43
mount olympus Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 43, 44
mountains, and the divine Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 37, 43, 44
mysteries Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
myth Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 37, 43, 44
natura Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237
nature Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 44
nausicaa Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
odysseus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
olives Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 260
oracle Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
orpheus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 260
paris Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 37
pastoral activity Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 37
patroklos Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 326
pausanias Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
pergamum Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
personification Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 260
pessimism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 260
phaeacian Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
philostratus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
plague Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 260
poetry and poetics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237
providentialism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 68
rain Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 44
rivers Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 44
rocks/stones Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 37
samothrace Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
scipio Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237
similes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237, 260; Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 37, 43, 44
smyrna Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
sphragis Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 260
storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 68, 260; Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 37, 43, 44
sublime, the Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 43, 44
thunder Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 44
trajan Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
viewing, from mountains Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 43
viewing, of mountains, from below, obstructed' Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 37
viewing, of mountains, from below, obstructed Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 43
viewing, of mountains, from below Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 43, 44
viewing Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 37
virgil, and aratus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 68
virgil, and homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237
vision, dream vision Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
war, and poetry Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 260
war, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237
war, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 260
war, punic wars Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237
war, trojan war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237
water Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
weather signs Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 68
xerxes Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 237
zeus, zeus philios Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63
zeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 68, 237; Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 43, 44; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 63