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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6677
Homer, Iliad, 24.525-24.533


ὡς γὰρ ἐπεκλώσαντο θεοὶ δειλοῖσι βροτοῖσιFor on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot


ζώειν ἀχνυμένοις· αὐτοὶ δέ τʼ ἀκηδέες εἰσί.For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot


δοιοὶ γάρ τε πίθοι κατακείαται ἐν Διὸς οὔδειFor on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot


δώρων οἷα δίδωσι κακῶν, ἕτερος δὲ ἑάων·For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot


ᾧ μέν κʼ ἀμμίξας δώῃ Ζεὺς τερπικέραυνοςFor on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot


ἄλλοτε μέν τε κακῷ ὅ γε κύρεται, ἄλλοτε δʼ ἐσθλῷ·that man meeteth now with evil, now with good; but to whomsoever he giveth but of the baneful, him he maketh to be reviled of man, and direful madness driveth him over the face of the sacred earth, and he wandereth honoured neither of gods nor mortals. Even so unto Peleus did the gods give glorious gifts


ᾧ δέ κε τῶν λυγρῶν δώῃ, λωβητὸν ἔθηκεthat man meeteth now with evil, now with good; but to whomsoever he giveth but of the baneful, him he maketh to be reviled of man, and direful madness driveth him over the face of the sacred earth, and he wandereth honoured neither of gods nor mortals. Even so unto Peleus did the gods give glorious gifts


καί ἑ κακὴ βούβρωστις ἐπὶ χθόνα δῖαν ἐλαύνειthat man meeteth now with evil, now with good; but to whomsoever he giveth but of the baneful, him he maketh to be reviled of man, and direful madness driveth him over the face of the sacred earth, and he wandereth honoured neither of gods nor mortals. Even so unto Peleus did the gods give glorious gifts


φοιτᾷ δʼ οὔτε θεοῖσι τετιμένος οὔτε βροτοῖσιν.that man meeteth now with evil, now with good; but to whomsoever he giveth but of the baneful, him he maketh to be reviled of man, and direful madness driveth him over the face of the sacred earth, and he wandereth honoured neither of gods nor mortals. Even so unto Peleus did the gods give glorious gifts


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

17 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 32.39 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

32.39. רְאוּ עַתָּה כִּי אֲנִי אֲנִי הוּא וְאֵין אֱלֹהִים עִמָּדִי אֲנִי אָמִית וַאֲחַיֶּה מָחַצְתִּי וַאֲנִי אֶרְפָּא וְאֵין מִיָּדִי מַצִּיל׃ 32.39. See now that I, even I, am He, And there is no god with Me; I kill, and I make alive; I have wounded, and I heal; And there is none that can deliver out of My hand."
2. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 50.20 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

50.20. And as for you, ye meant evil against me; but God meant it for good, to bring to pass, as it is this day, to save much people alive."
3. Hebrew Bible, Job, 2.10, 5.17-5.18, 12.13, 12.18 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

5.17. הִנֵּה אַשְׁרֵי אֱנוֹשׁ יוֹכִחֶנּוּ אֱלוֹהַּ וּמוּסַר שַׁדַּי אַל־תִּמְאָס׃ 5.18. כִּי הוּא יַכְאִיב וְיֶחְבָּשׁ יִמְחַץ וידו [וְיָדָיו] תִּרְפֶּינָה׃ 2.10. But he said unto her: ‘Thou speakest as one of the impious women speaketh. What? shall we receive good at the hand of God, and shall we not receive evil?’ For all this did not Job sin with his lips." 5.17. Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth; Therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty." 5.18. For He maketh sore, and bindeth up; He woundeth, and His hands make whole."
4. Hebrew Bible, Amos, 3.6 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

3.6. אִם־יִתָּקַע שׁוֹפָר בְּעִיר וְעָם לֹא יֶחֱרָדוּ אִם־תִּהְיֶה רָעָה בְּעִיר וַיהוָה לֹא עָשָׂה׃ 3.6. Shall the horn be blown in a city, And the people not tremble? Shall evil befall a city, And the LORD hath not done it?"
5. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 45.7 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

45.7. יוֹצֵר אוֹר וּבוֹרֵא חֹשֶׁךְ עֹשֶׂה שָׁלוֹם וּבוֹרֵא רָע אֲנִי יְהוָה עֹשֶׂה כָל־אֵלֶּה׃ 45.7. I form the light, and create darkness; I make peace, and create evil; I am the LORD, that doeth all these things."
6. Hesiod, Works And Days, 101-104, 213-247, 638, 667-669, 717-718, 90-100 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

100. Which brought the Death-Gods. Now in misery
7. Hesiod, Theogony, 219-220, 633-634, 900, 905, 218 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

218. Because she first saw light amid the swell
8. Homer, Iliad, 2.419-2.420, 3.182, 6.145-6.149, 8.306-8.308, 12.322-12.323, 13.1-13.9, 15.109, 16.250-16.252, 18.115-18.116, 21.106-21.107, 21.462-21.465, 22.167-22.187, 22.335-22.337, 22.354, 22.395-22.404, 24.5, 24.49, 24.51-24.55, 24.328, 24.468-24.524, 24.526-24.551 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.419. /and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. So spake he; but not as yet would the son of Cronos grant him fulfillment; 2.420. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 3.182. /And he was husband's brother to shameless me, as sure as ever such a one there was. So spake she, and the old man was seized with wonder, and said:Ah, happy son of Atreus, child of fortune, blest of heaven; now see I that youths of the Achaeans full many are made subject unto thee. Ere now have I journeyed to the land of Phrygia, rich in vines 6.145. / Great-souled son of Tydeus, wherefore inquirest thou of my lineage? Even as are the generations of leaves, such are those also of men. As for the leaves, the wind scattereth some upon the earth, but the forest, as it bourgeons, putteth forth others when the season of spring is come; even so of men one generation springeth up and another passeth away. 6.146. / Great-souled son of Tydeus, wherefore inquirest thou of my lineage? Even as are the generations of leaves, such are those also of men. As for the leaves, the wind scattereth some upon the earth, but the forest, as it bourgeons, putteth forth others when the season of spring is come; even so of men one generation springeth up and another passeth away. 6.147. / Great-souled son of Tydeus, wherefore inquirest thou of my lineage? Even as are the generations of leaves, such are those also of men. As for the leaves, the wind scattereth some upon the earth, but the forest, as it bourgeons, putteth forth others when the season of spring is come; even so of men one generation springeth up and another passeth away. 6.148. / Great-souled son of Tydeus, wherefore inquirest thou of my lineage? Even as are the generations of leaves, such are those also of men. As for the leaves, the wind scattereth some upon the earth, but the forest, as it bourgeons, putteth forth others when the season of spring is come; even so of men one generation springeth up and another passeth away. 6.149. / Great-souled son of Tydeus, wherefore inquirest thou of my lineage? Even as are the generations of leaves, such are those also of men. As for the leaves, the wind scattereth some upon the earth, but the forest, as it bourgeons, putteth forth others when the season of spring is come; even so of men one generation springeth up and another passeth away. 8.306. /even fair Castianeira, in form like to the goddesses. And he bowed his head to one side like a poppy that in a garden is laden with its fruit and the rains of spring; so bowed he to one side his head, laden with his helmet.And Teucer shot another arrow from the string 8.307. /even fair Castianeira, in form like to the goddesses. And he bowed his head to one side like a poppy that in a garden is laden with its fruit and the rains of spring; so bowed he to one side his head, laden with his helmet.And Teucer shot another arrow from the string 8.308. /even fair Castianeira, in form like to the goddesses. And he bowed his head to one side like a poppy that in a garden is laden with its fruit and the rains of spring; so bowed he to one side his head, laden with his helmet.And Teucer shot another arrow from the string 12.322. /and drink choice wine, honey-sweet: nay, but their might too is goodly, seeing they fight amid the foremost Lycians. Ah friend, if once escaped from this battle we were for ever to be ageless and immortal, neither should I fight myself amid the foremost 12.323. /and drink choice wine, honey-sweet: nay, but their might too is goodly, seeing they fight amid the foremost Lycians. Ah friend, if once escaped from this battle we were for ever to be ageless and immortal, neither should I fight myself amid the foremost 13.1. /Now Zeus, when he had brought the Trojans and Hector to the ships, left the combatants there to have toil and woe unceasingly, but himself turned away his bright eyes, and looked afar, upon the land of the Thracian horsemen 13.2. /Now Zeus, when he had brought the Trojans and Hector to the ships, left the combatants there to have toil and woe unceasingly, but himself turned away his bright eyes, and looked afar, upon the land of the Thracian horsemen 13.3. /Now Zeus, when he had brought the Trojans and Hector to the ships, left the combatants there to have toil and woe unceasingly, but himself turned away his bright eyes, and looked afar, upon the land of the Thracian horsemen 13.4. /Now Zeus, when he had brought the Trojans and Hector to the ships, left the combatants there to have toil and woe unceasingly, but himself turned away his bright eyes, and looked afar, upon the land of the Thracian horsemen 13.5. /Now Zeus, when he had brought the Trojans and Hector to the ships, left the combatants there to have toil and woe unceasingly, but himself turned away his bright eyes, and looked afar, upon the land of the Thracian horsemen 13.5. /and of the Mysians that fight in close combat, and of the lordly Hippemolgi that drink the milk of mares, and of the Abii, the most righteous of men. To Troy he no longer in any wise turned his bright eyes, for he deemed not in his heart that any of the immortals would draw nigh to aid either Trojans or Danaans. 13.6. /and of the Mysians that fight in close combat, and of the lordly Hippemolgi that drink the milk of mares, and of the Abii, the most righteous of men. To Troy he no longer in any wise turned his bright eyes, for he deemed not in his heart that any of the immortals would draw nigh to aid either Trojans or Danaans. 13.7. /and of the Mysians that fight in close combat, and of the lordly Hippemolgi that drink the milk of mares, and of the Abii, the most righteous of men. To Troy he no longer in any wise turned his bright eyes, for he deemed not in his heart that any of the immortals would draw nigh to aid either Trojans or Danaans. 13.8. /and of the Mysians that fight in close combat, and of the lordly Hippemolgi that drink the milk of mares, and of the Abii, the most righteous of men. To Troy he no longer in any wise turned his bright eyes, for he deemed not in his heart that any of the immortals would draw nigh to aid either Trojans or Danaans. 13.9. /and of the Mysians that fight in close combat, and of the lordly Hippemolgi that drink the milk of mares, and of the Abii, the most righteous of men. To Troy he no longer in any wise turned his bright eyes, for he deemed not in his heart that any of the immortals would draw nigh to aid either Trojans or Danaans. 15.109. /In sooth we are even yet fain to draw nigh unto him and thwart him of his will by word or by constraint, but he sitteth apart and recketh not, neither giveth heed thereto; for he deemeth that among the immortal gods he is manifestly supreme in might and strength. Wherefore content ye yourselves with whatsoever evil thing he sendeth upon each. 16.250. /and a part the Father granted him, and a part denied. That Patroclus should thrust back the war and battle from the ships he granted; but that he should return safe from out the battle he denied.Achilles then, when he had poured libation and made prayer to father Zeus, went again into his tent, and laid the cup away in the chest, and came forth and 16.251. /and a part the Father granted him, and a part denied. That Patroclus should thrust back the war and battle from the ships he granted; but that he should return safe from out the battle he denied.Achilles then, when he had poured libation and made prayer to father Zeus, went again into his tent, and laid the cup away in the chest, and came forth and 16.252. /and a part the Father granted him, and a part denied. That Patroclus should thrust back the war and battle from the ships he granted; but that he should return safe from out the battle he denied.Achilles then, when he had poured libation and made prayer to father Zeus, went again into his tent, and laid the cup away in the chest, and came forth and 18.115. /even on Hector; for my fate, I will accept it whenso Zeus willeth to bring it to pass, and the other immortal gods. For not even the mighty Heracles escaped death, albeit he was most dear to Zeus, son of Cronos, the king, but fate overcame him, and the dread wrath of Hera. 18.116. /even on Hector; for my fate, I will accept it whenso Zeus willeth to bring it to pass, and the other immortal gods. For not even the mighty Heracles escaped death, albeit he was most dear to Zeus, son of Cronos, the king, but fate overcame him, and the dread wrath of Hera. 21.106. /aye, not one among all the Trojans, and least of all among the sons of Priam. Nay, friend, do thou too die; why lamentest thou thus? Patroclus also died, who was better far than thou. And seest thou not what manner of man am I, how comely and how tall? A good man was my father, and a goddess the mother that bare me; yet over me too hang death and mighty fate. 21.107. /aye, not one among all the Trojans, and least of all among the sons of Priam. Nay, friend, do thou too die; why lamentest thou thus? Patroclus also died, who was better far than thou. And seest thou not what manner of man am I, how comely and how tall? A good man was my father, and a goddess the mother that bare me; yet over me too hang death and mighty fate. 21.462. /in utter ruin with their children and their honoured wives. Then spake unto him lord Apollo, that worketh afar:Shaker of Earth, as nowise sound of mind wouldest thou count me, if I should war with thee for the sake of mortals, pitiful creatures, that like unto leaves 21.463. /in utter ruin with their children and their honoured wives. Then spake unto him lord Apollo, that worketh afar:Shaker of Earth, as nowise sound of mind wouldest thou count me, if I should war with thee for the sake of mortals, pitiful creatures, that like unto leaves 21.464. /in utter ruin with their children and their honoured wives. Then spake unto him lord Apollo, that worketh afar:Shaker of Earth, as nowise sound of mind wouldest thou count me, if I should war with thee for the sake of mortals, pitiful creatures, that like unto leaves 21.465. /are now full of flaming life, eating the fruit of the field, and now again pine away and perish. Nay, with speed let us cease from strife, and let them do battle by themselves. 22.167. /even so these twain circled thrice with swift feet about the city of Priam; and all the gods gazed upon them. Then among these the father of men and gods was first to speak:Look you now, in sooth a well-loved man do mine eyes behold pursued around the wall; and my heart hath sorrow 22.168. /even so these twain circled thrice with swift feet about the city of Priam; and all the gods gazed upon them. Then among these the father of men and gods was first to speak:Look you now, in sooth a well-loved man do mine eyes behold pursued around the wall; and my heart hath sorrow 22.169. /even so these twain circled thrice with swift feet about the city of Priam; and all the gods gazed upon them. Then among these the father of men and gods was first to speak:Look you now, in sooth a well-loved man do mine eyes behold pursued around the wall; and my heart hath sorrow 22.170. /for Hector, who hath burned for me many thighs of oxen on the crests of many-ridged Ida, and at other times on the topmost citadel; but now again is goodly Achilles pursuing him with swift feet around the city of Priam. Nay then, come, ye gods, bethink you and take counsel 22.171. /for Hector, who hath burned for me many thighs of oxen on the crests of many-ridged Ida, and at other times on the topmost citadel; but now again is goodly Achilles pursuing him with swift feet around the city of Priam. Nay then, come, ye gods, bethink you and take counsel 22.172. /for Hector, who hath burned for me many thighs of oxen on the crests of many-ridged Ida, and at other times on the topmost citadel; but now again is goodly Achilles pursuing him with swift feet around the city of Priam. Nay then, come, ye gods, bethink you and take counsel 22.173. /for Hector, who hath burned for me many thighs of oxen on the crests of many-ridged Ida, and at other times on the topmost citadel; but now again is goodly Achilles pursuing him with swift feet around the city of Priam. Nay then, come, ye gods, bethink you and take counsel 22.174. /for Hector, who hath burned for me many thighs of oxen on the crests of many-ridged Ida, and at other times on the topmost citadel; but now again is goodly Achilles pursuing him with swift feet around the city of Priam. Nay then, come, ye gods, bethink you and take counsel 22.175. /whether we shall save him from death, or now at length shall slay him, good man though he be, by the hand of Achilles, son of Peleus. 22.176. /whether we shall save him from death, or now at length shall slay him, good man though he be, by the hand of Achilles, son of Peleus. 22.177. /whether we shall save him from death, or now at length shall slay him, good man though he be, by the hand of Achilles, son of Peleus. 22.178. /whether we shall save him from death, or now at length shall slay him, good man though he be, by the hand of Achilles, son of Peleus. 22.179. /whether we shall save him from death, or now at length shall slay him, good man though he be, by the hand of Achilles, son of Peleus. Then spake unto him the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene:O Father, Lord of the bright lightning and of the dark cloud, what a word hast thou said! A man that is mortal, doomed long since by fate, art thou minded 22.180. /to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. Then in answer to her spake Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Be of good cheer, Tritogeneia, dear child. In no wise do I speak with full purpose of heart, but am minded to be kindly to thee. 22.181. /to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. Then in answer to her spake Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Be of good cheer, Tritogeneia, dear child. In no wise do I speak with full purpose of heart, but am minded to be kindly to thee. 22.182. /to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. Then in answer to her spake Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Be of good cheer, Tritogeneia, dear child. In no wise do I speak with full purpose of heart, but am minded to be kindly to thee. 22.183. /to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. Then in answer to her spake Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Be of good cheer, Tritogeneia, dear child. In no wise do I speak with full purpose of heart, but am minded to be kindly to thee. 22.184. /to deliver again from dolorous death? Do as thou wilt; but be sure that we other gods assent not all thereto. Then in answer to her spake Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Be of good cheer, Tritogeneia, dear child. In no wise do I speak with full purpose of heart, but am minded to be kindly to thee. 22.185. /Do as thy pleasure is and hold thee back no more. So saying he urged on Athene that was already eager, and down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting.But hard upon Hector pressed swift Achilles in ceaseless pursuit. And as when on the mountains a hound 22.186. /Do as thy pleasure is and hold thee back no more. So saying he urged on Athene that was already eager, and down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting.But hard upon Hector pressed swift Achilles in ceaseless pursuit. And as when on the mountains a hound 22.187. /Do as thy pleasure is and hold thee back no more. So saying he urged on Athene that was already eager, and down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting.But hard upon Hector pressed swift Achilles in ceaseless pursuit. And as when on the mountains a hound 22.335. /even I, that have loosed thy knees. Thee shall dogs and birds rend in unseemly wise, but to him shall the Achaeans give burial. 22.336. /even I, that have loosed thy knees. Thee shall dogs and birds rend in unseemly wise, but to him shall the Achaeans give burial. 22.337. /even I, that have loosed thy knees. Thee shall dogs and birds rend in unseemly wise, but to him shall the Achaeans give burial. 22.354. /and should promise yet more; nay, not though Priam, son of Dardanus, should bid pay thy weight in gold; not even so shall thy queenly mother lay thee on a bier and make lament for thee, the son herself did bear, but dogs and birds shall devour thee utterly. 22.395. /He spake, and devised foul entreatment for goodly Hector. The tendons of both his feet behind he pierced from heel to ankle, and made fast therethrough thongs of oxhide, and bound them to his chariot, but left the head to trail. Then when he had mounted his car and had lifted therein the glorious armour 22.396. /He spake, and devised foul entreatment for goodly Hector. The tendons of both his feet behind he pierced from heel to ankle, and made fast therethrough thongs of oxhide, and bound them to his chariot, but left the head to trail. Then when he had mounted his car and had lifted therein the glorious armour 22.397. /He spake, and devised foul entreatment for goodly Hector. The tendons of both his feet behind he pierced from heel to ankle, and made fast therethrough thongs of oxhide, and bound them to his chariot, but left the head to trail. Then when he had mounted his car and had lifted therein the glorious armour 22.398. /He spake, and devised foul entreatment for goodly Hector. The tendons of both his feet behind he pierced from heel to ankle, and made fast therethrough thongs of oxhide, and bound them to his chariot, but left the head to trail. Then when he had mounted his car and had lifted therein the glorious armour 22.399. /He spake, and devised foul entreatment for goodly Hector. The tendons of both his feet behind he pierced from heel to ankle, and made fast therethrough thongs of oxhide, and bound them to his chariot, but left the head to trail. Then when he had mounted his car and had lifted therein the glorious armour 22.400. /he touched the horses with the lash to start thiem, and nothing loath the pair sped onward. And from Hector as he was dragged the dust rose up, and on either side his dark hair flowed outspread, and all in the dust lay the head that was before so fair; but now had Zeus given him over to his foes to suffer foul entreatment in his own native land. 22.401. /he touched the horses with the lash to start thiem, and nothing loath the pair sped onward. And from Hector as he was dragged the dust rose up, and on either side his dark hair flowed outspread, and all in the dust lay the head that was before so fair; but now had Zeus given him over to his foes to suffer foul entreatment in his own native land. 22.402. /he touched the horses with the lash to start thiem, and nothing loath the pair sped onward. And from Hector as he was dragged the dust rose up, and on either side his dark hair flowed outspread, and all in the dust lay the head that was before so fair; but now had Zeus given him over to his foes to suffer foul entreatment in his own native land. 22.403. /he touched the horses with the lash to start thiem, and nothing loath the pair sped onward. And from Hector as he was dragged the dust rose up, and on either side his dark hair flowed outspread, and all in the dust lay the head that was before so fair; but now had Zeus given him over to his foes to suffer foul entreatment in his own native land. 22.404. /he touched the horses with the lash to start thiem, and nothing loath the pair sped onward. And from Hector as he was dragged the dust rose up, and on either side his dark hair flowed outspread, and all in the dust lay the head that was before so fair; but now had Zeus given him over to his foes to suffer foul entreatment in his own native land. 24.5. /Then was the gathering broken up, and the folk scattered, each man to go to his own ship. The rest bethought them of supper and of sweet sleep, to take their fill thereof; but Achilles wept, ever remembering his dear comrade, neither might sleep 24.5. /that mastereth all, lay hold of him, but he turned him ever to this side or to that, yearning for the man-hood and valorous might of Patroclus, thinking on all he had wrought with him and all the woes he had borne, passing though wars of men and the grievous waves. Thinking thereon he would shed big tears 24.49. /the which harmeth men greatly and profiteth them withal. Lo, it may be that a man hath lost one dearer even than was this—a brother, that the selfsame mother bare, or haply a son; yet verily when he hath wept and wailed for him he maketh an end; for an enduring soul have the Fates given unto men. 24.51. /But this man, when he hath reft goodly Hector of life, bindeth him behind his chariot and draggeth him about the barrow of his dear comrade; in sooth neither honour nor profit shall he have therefrom. Let him beware lest we wax wroth with him, good man though he be; for lo, in his fury he doth foul despite unto senseless clay. 24.52. /But this man, when he hath reft goodly Hector of life, bindeth him behind his chariot and draggeth him about the barrow of his dear comrade; in sooth neither honour nor profit shall he have therefrom. Let him beware lest we wax wroth with him, good man though he be; for lo, in his fury he doth foul despite unto senseless clay. 24.53. /But this man, when he hath reft goodly Hector of life, bindeth him behind his chariot and draggeth him about the barrow of his dear comrade; in sooth neither honour nor profit shall he have therefrom. Let him beware lest we wax wroth with him, good man though he be; for lo, in his fury he doth foul despite unto senseless clay. 24.54. /But this man, when he hath reft goodly Hector of life, bindeth him behind his chariot and draggeth him about the barrow of his dear comrade; in sooth neither honour nor profit shall he have therefrom. Let him beware lest we wax wroth with him, good man though he be; for lo, in his fury he doth foul despite unto senseless clay. 24.55. /Then stirred to anger spake to him white-armed Hera:Even this might be as thou sayest, Lord of the silver bow, if indeed ye gods will vouchsafe like honour to Achilles and to Hector. Hector is but mortal and was suckled at a woman's breast, but Achilles is the child of a goddess that I mine own self 24.328. /driven of wise-hearted Idaeus, and behind came the horses that the old man ever plying the lash drave swiftly through the city; and his kinsfolk all followed wailing aloud as for one faring to his death. But when they had gone down from the city and were come to the plain 24.468. /But go thou in, and clasp the knees of the son of Peleus and entreat him by his father and his fair-haired mother and his child, that thou mayest stir his soul. 24.469. /But go thou in, and clasp the knees of the son of Peleus and entreat him by his father and his fair-haired mother and his child, that thou mayest stir his soul. So spake Hermes, and departed unto high Olympus; and Priam leapt from his chariot to the ground 24.470. /and left there Idaeus, who abode holding the horses and mules; but the old man went straight toward the house where Achilles, dear to Zeus, was wont to sit. Therein he found Achilles, but his comrades sat apart: two only, the warrior Automedon and Alcimus, scion of Ares 24.471. /and left there Idaeus, who abode holding the horses and mules; but the old man went straight toward the house where Achilles, dear to Zeus, was wont to sit. Therein he found Achilles, but his comrades sat apart: two only, the warrior Automedon and Alcimus, scion of Ares 24.472. /and left there Idaeus, who abode holding the horses and mules; but the old man went straight toward the house where Achilles, dear to Zeus, was wont to sit. Therein he found Achilles, but his comrades sat apart: two only, the warrior Automedon and Alcimus, scion of Ares 24.473. /and left there Idaeus, who abode holding the horses and mules; but the old man went straight toward the house where Achilles, dear to Zeus, was wont to sit. Therein he found Achilles, but his comrades sat apart: two only, the warrior Automedon and Alcimus, scion of Ares 24.474. /and left there Idaeus, who abode holding the horses and mules; but the old man went straight toward the house where Achilles, dear to Zeus, was wont to sit. Therein he found Achilles, but his comrades sat apart: two only, the warrior Automedon and Alcimus, scion of Ares 24.475. /waited busily upon him; and he was newly ceased from meat, even from eating and drinking, and the table yet stood by his side. Unseen of these great Priam entered in, and coming close to Achilles, clasped in his hands his knees, and kissed his hands, the terrible, man-slaying hands that had slain his many sons. 24.476. /waited busily upon him; and he was newly ceased from meat, even from eating and drinking, and the table yet stood by his side. Unseen of these great Priam entered in, and coming close to Achilles, clasped in his hands his knees, and kissed his hands, the terrible, man-slaying hands that had slain his many sons. 24.477. /waited busily upon him; and he was newly ceased from meat, even from eating and drinking, and the table yet stood by his side. Unseen of these great Priam entered in, and coming close to Achilles, clasped in his hands his knees, and kissed his hands, the terrible, man-slaying hands that had slain his many sons. 24.478. /waited busily upon him; and he was newly ceased from meat, even from eating and drinking, and the table yet stood by his side. Unseen of these great Priam entered in, and coming close to Achilles, clasped in his hands his knees, and kissed his hands, the terrible, man-slaying hands that had slain his many sons. 24.479. /waited busily upon him; and he was newly ceased from meat, even from eating and drinking, and the table yet stood by his side. Unseen of these great Priam entered in, and coming close to Achilles, clasped in his hands his knees, and kissed his hands, the terrible, man-slaying hands that had slain his many sons. 24.480. /And as when sore blindness of heart cometh upon a man, that in his own country slayeth another and escapeth to a land of strangers, to the house of some man of substance, and wonder holdeth them that look upon him; even so was Achilles seized with wonder at sight of godlike Priam, and seized with wonder were the others likewise, and they glanced one at the other. 24.481. /And as when sore blindness of heart cometh upon a man, that in his own country slayeth another and escapeth to a land of strangers, to the house of some man of substance, and wonder holdeth them that look upon him; even so was Achilles seized with wonder at sight of godlike Priam, and seized with wonder were the others likewise, and they glanced one at the other. 24.482. /And as when sore blindness of heart cometh upon a man, that in his own country slayeth another and escapeth to a land of strangers, to the house of some man of substance, and wonder holdeth them that look upon him; even so was Achilles seized with wonder at sight of godlike Priam, and seized with wonder were the others likewise, and they glanced one at the other. 24.483. /And as when sore blindness of heart cometh upon a man, that in his own country slayeth another and escapeth to a land of strangers, to the house of some man of substance, and wonder holdeth them that look upon him; even so was Achilles seized with wonder at sight of godlike Priam, and seized with wonder were the others likewise, and they glanced one at the other. 24.484. /And as when sore blindness of heart cometh upon a man, that in his own country slayeth another and escapeth to a land of strangers, to the house of some man of substance, and wonder holdeth them that look upon him; even so was Achilles seized with wonder at sight of godlike Priam, and seized with wonder were the others likewise, and they glanced one at the other. 24.485. /But Priam made entreaty, and spake to him, saying:Remember thy father, O Achilles like to the gods, whose years are even as mine, on the grievous threshold of old age. Him full likely the dwellers that be round about are entreating evilly, neither is there any to ward from him ruin and bane. 24.486. /But Priam made entreaty, and spake to him, saying:Remember thy father, O Achilles like to the gods, whose years are even as mine, on the grievous threshold of old age. Him full likely the dwellers that be round about are entreating evilly, neither is there any to ward from him ruin and bane. 24.487. /But Priam made entreaty, and spake to him, saying:Remember thy father, O Achilles like to the gods, whose years are even as mine, on the grievous threshold of old age. Him full likely the dwellers that be round about are entreating evilly, neither is there any to ward from him ruin and bane. 24.488. /But Priam made entreaty, and spake to him, saying:Remember thy father, O Achilles like to the gods, whose years are even as mine, on the grievous threshold of old age. Him full likely the dwellers that be round about are entreating evilly, neither is there any to ward from him ruin and bane. 24.489. /But Priam made entreaty, and spake to him, saying:Remember thy father, O Achilles like to the gods, whose years are even as mine, on the grievous threshold of old age. Him full likely the dwellers that be round about are entreating evilly, neither is there any to ward from him ruin and bane. 24.490. /Howbeit, while he heareth of thee as yet alive he hath joy at heart, and therewithal hopeth day by day that he shall see his dear son returning from Troy-land. But I—I am utterly unblest, seeing I begat sons the best in the broad land of Troy, yet of them I avow that not one is left. 24.491. /Howbeit, while he heareth of thee as yet alive he hath joy at heart, and therewithal hopeth day by day that he shall see his dear son returning from Troy-land. But I—I am utterly unblest, seeing I begat sons the best in the broad land of Troy, yet of them I avow that not one is left. 24.492. /Howbeit, while he heareth of thee as yet alive he hath joy at heart, and therewithal hopeth day by day that he shall see his dear son returning from Troy-land. But I—I am utterly unblest, seeing I begat sons the best in the broad land of Troy, yet of them I avow that not one is left. 24.493. /Howbeit, while he heareth of thee as yet alive he hath joy at heart, and therewithal hopeth day by day that he shall see his dear son returning from Troy-land. But I—I am utterly unblest, seeing I begat sons the best in the broad land of Troy, yet of them I avow that not one is left. 24.494. /Howbeit, while he heareth of thee as yet alive he hath joy at heart, and therewithal hopeth day by day that he shall see his dear son returning from Troy-land. But I—I am utterly unblest, seeing I begat sons the best in the broad land of Troy, yet of them I avow that not one is left. 24.495. /Fifty I had, when the sons of the Achaeans came; nineteen were born to me of the self-same womb, and the others women of the palace bare. of these, many as they were, furious Ares hath loosed the knees, and he that alone was left me, that by himself guarded the city and the men 24.496. /Fifty I had, when the sons of the Achaeans came; nineteen were born to me of the self-same womb, and the others women of the palace bare. of these, many as they were, furious Ares hath loosed the knees, and he that alone was left me, that by himself guarded the city and the men 24.497. /Fifty I had, when the sons of the Achaeans came; nineteen were born to me of the self-same womb, and the others women of the palace bare. of these, many as they were, furious Ares hath loosed the knees, and he that alone was left me, that by himself guarded the city and the men 24.498. /Fifty I had, when the sons of the Achaeans came; nineteen were born to me of the self-same womb, and the others women of the palace bare. of these, many as they were, furious Ares hath loosed the knees, and he that alone was left me, that by himself guarded the city and the men 24.499. /Fifty I had, when the sons of the Achaeans came; nineteen were born to me of the self-same womb, and the others women of the palace bare. of these, many as they were, furious Ares hath loosed the knees, and he that alone was left me, that by himself guarded the city and the men 24.500. /him thou slewest but now as he fought for his country, even Hector. For his sake am I now come to the ships of the Achaeans to win him back from thee, and I bear with me ransom past counting. Nay, have thou awe of the gods, Achilles, and take pity on me, remembering thine own father. Lo, I am more piteous far than he 24.501. /him thou slewest but now as he fought for his country, even Hector. For his sake am I now come to the ships of the Achaeans to win him back from thee, and I bear with me ransom past counting. Nay, have thou awe of the gods, Achilles, and take pity on me, remembering thine own father. Lo, I am more piteous far than he 24.502. /him thou slewest but now as he fought for his country, even Hector. For his sake am I now come to the ships of the Achaeans to win him back from thee, and I bear with me ransom past counting. Nay, have thou awe of the gods, Achilles, and take pity on me, remembering thine own father. Lo, I am more piteous far than he 24.503. /him thou slewest but now as he fought for his country, even Hector. For his sake am I now come to the ships of the Achaeans to win him back from thee, and I bear with me ransom past counting. Nay, have thou awe of the gods, Achilles, and take pity on me, remembering thine own father. Lo, I am more piteous far than he 24.504. /him thou slewest but now as he fought for his country, even Hector. For his sake am I now come to the ships of the Achaeans to win him back from thee, and I bear with me ransom past counting. Nay, have thou awe of the gods, Achilles, and take pity on me, remembering thine own father. Lo, I am more piteous far than he 24.505. /and have endured what no other mortal on the face of earth hath yet endured, to reach forth my hand to the face of him that hath slain my sons. 24.506. /and have endured what no other mortal on the face of earth hath yet endured, to reach forth my hand to the face of him that hath slain my sons. 24.507. /and have endured what no other mortal on the face of earth hath yet endured, to reach forth my hand to the face of him that hath slain my sons. 24.508. /and have endured what no other mortal on the face of earth hath yet endured, to reach forth my hand to the face of him that hath slain my sons. 24.509. /and have endured what no other mortal on the face of earth hath yet endured, to reach forth my hand to the face of him that hath slain my sons. So spake he, and in Achilles he roused desire to weep for his father; and he took the old man by the hand, and gently put him from him. So the twain bethought them of their dead, and wept; the one for man-slaying Hector wept sore 24.510. /the while he grovelled at Achilles' feet, but Achilles wept for his own father, and now again for Patroclus; and the sound of their moaning went up through the house. But when goodly Achilles had had his fill of lamenting, and the longing therefor had departed from his heart and limbs 24.511. /the while he grovelled at Achilles' feet, but Achilles wept for his own father, and now again for Patroclus; and the sound of their moaning went up through the house. But when goodly Achilles had had his fill of lamenting, and the longing therefor had departed from his heart and limbs 24.512. /the while he grovelled at Achilles' feet, but Achilles wept for his own father, and now again for Patroclus; and the sound of their moaning went up through the house. But when goodly Achilles had had his fill of lamenting, and the longing therefor had departed from his heart and limbs 24.513. /the while he grovelled at Achilles' feet, but Achilles wept for his own father, and now again for Patroclus; and the sound of their moaning went up through the house. But when goodly Achilles had had his fill of lamenting, and the longing therefor had departed from his heart and limbs 24.514. /the while he grovelled at Achilles' feet, but Achilles wept for his own father, and now again for Patroclus; and the sound of their moaning went up through the house. But when goodly Achilles had had his fill of lamenting, and the longing therefor had departed from his heart and limbs 24.515. /forthwith then he sprang from his seat, and raised the old man by his hand, pitying his hoary head and hoary beard; and he spake and addressed him with winged words: Ah, unhappy man, full many in good sooth are the evils thou hast endured in thy soul. How hadst thou the heart to come alone to the ships of the Achaeans 24.516. /forthwith then he sprang from his seat, and raised the old man by his hand, pitying his hoary head and hoary beard; and he spake and addressed him with winged words: Ah, unhappy man, full many in good sooth are the evils thou hast endured in thy soul. How hadst thou the heart to come alone to the ships of the Achaeans 24.517. /forthwith then he sprang from his seat, and raised the old man by his hand, pitying his hoary head and hoary beard; and he spake and addressed him with winged words: Ah, unhappy man, full many in good sooth are the evils thou hast endured in thy soul. How hadst thou the heart to come alone to the ships of the Achaeans 24.518. /forthwith then he sprang from his seat, and raised the old man by his hand, pitying his hoary head and hoary beard; and he spake and addressed him with winged words: Ah, unhappy man, full many in good sooth are the evils thou hast endured in thy soul. How hadst thou the heart to come alone to the ships of the Achaeans 24.519. /forthwith then he sprang from his seat, and raised the old man by his hand, pitying his hoary head and hoary beard; and he spake and addressed him with winged words: Ah, unhappy man, full many in good sooth are the evils thou hast endured in thy soul. How hadst thou the heart to come alone to the ships of the Achaeans 24.520. /to meet the eyes of me that have slain thy sons many and valiant? of iron verily is thy heart. But come, sit thou upon a seat, and our sorrows will we suffer to lie quiet in our hearts, despite our pain; for no profit cometh of chill lament. 24.521. /to meet the eyes of me that have slain thy sons many and valiant? of iron verily is thy heart. But come, sit thou upon a seat, and our sorrows will we suffer to lie quiet in our hearts, despite our pain; for no profit cometh of chill lament. 24.522. /to meet the eyes of me that have slain thy sons many and valiant? of iron verily is thy heart. But come, sit thou upon a seat, and our sorrows will we suffer to lie quiet in our hearts, despite our pain; for no profit cometh of chill lament. 24.523. /to meet the eyes of me that have slain thy sons many and valiant? of iron verily is thy heart. But come, sit thou upon a seat, and our sorrows will we suffer to lie quiet in our hearts, despite our pain; for no profit cometh of chill lament. 24.524. /to meet the eyes of me that have slain thy sons many and valiant? of iron verily is thy heart. But come, sit thou upon a seat, and our sorrows will we suffer to lie quiet in our hearts, despite our pain; for no profit cometh of chill lament. 24.526. /For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot 24.527. /For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot 24.528. /For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot 24.529. /For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot 24.530. /that man meeteth now with evil, now with good; but to whomsoever he giveth but of the baneful, him he maketh to be reviled of man, and direful madness driveth him over the face of the sacred earth, and he wandereth honoured neither of gods nor mortals. Even so unto Peleus did the gods give glorious gifts 24.531. /that man meeteth now with evil, now with good; but to whomsoever he giveth but of the baneful, him he maketh to be reviled of man, and direful madness driveth him over the face of the sacred earth, and he wandereth honoured neither of gods nor mortals. Even so unto Peleus did the gods give glorious gifts 24.532. /that man meeteth now with evil, now with good; but to whomsoever he giveth but of the baneful, him he maketh to be reviled of man, and direful madness driveth him over the face of the sacred earth, and he wandereth honoured neither of gods nor mortals. Even so unto Peleus did the gods give glorious gifts 24.533. /that man meeteth now with evil, now with good; but to whomsoever he giveth but of the baneful, him he maketh to be reviled of man, and direful madness driveth him over the face of the sacred earth, and he wandereth honoured neither of gods nor mortals. Even so unto Peleus did the gods give glorious gifts 24.534. /that man meeteth now with evil, now with good; but to whomsoever he giveth but of the baneful, him he maketh to be reviled of man, and direful madness driveth him over the face of the sacred earth, and he wandereth honoured neither of gods nor mortals. Even so unto Peleus did the gods give glorious gifts 24.535. /from his birth; for he excelled all men in good estate and in wealth, and was king over the Myrmidons, and to him that was but a mortal the gods gave a goddess to be his wife. 24.536. /from his birth; for he excelled all men in good estate and in wealth, and was king over the Myrmidons, and to him that was but a mortal the gods gave a goddess to be his wife. 24.537. /from his birth; for he excelled all men in good estate and in wealth, and was king over the Myrmidons, and to him that was but a mortal the gods gave a goddess to be his wife. 24.538. /from his birth; for he excelled all men in good estate and in wealth, and was king over the Myrmidons, and to him that was but a mortal the gods gave a goddess to be his wife. 24.539. /from his birth; for he excelled all men in good estate and in wealth, and was king over the Myrmidons, and to him that was but a mortal the gods gave a goddess to be his wife. 24.540. /Howbeit even upon him the gods brought evil, in that there nowise sprang up in his halls offspring of princely sons, but he begat one only son, doomed to an untimely fate. Neither may I tend him as he groweth old, seeing that far, far from mine own country I abide in the land of Troy, vexing thee and thy children. And of thee, old sire, we hear that of old thou wast blest; how of all that toward the sea Lesbos, the seat of Macar, encloseth 24.541. /Howbeit even upon him the gods brought evil, in that there nowise sprang up in his halls offspring of princely sons, but he begat one only son, doomed to an untimely fate. Neither may I tend him as he groweth old, seeing that far, far from mine own country I abide in the land of Troy, vexing thee and thy children. And of thee, old sire, we hear that of old thou wast blest; how of all that toward the sea Lesbos, the seat of Macar, encloseth 24.542. /Howbeit even upon him the gods brought evil, in that there nowise sprang up in his halls offspring of princely sons, but he begat one only son, doomed to an untimely fate. Neither may I tend him as he groweth old, seeing that far, far from mine own country I abide in the land of Troy, vexing thee and thy children. And of thee, old sire, we hear that of old thou wast blest; how of all that toward the sea Lesbos, the seat of Macar, encloseth 24.543. /Howbeit even upon him the gods brought evil, in that there nowise sprang up in his halls offspring of princely sons, but he begat one only son, doomed to an untimely fate. Neither may I tend him as he groweth old, seeing that far, far from mine own country I abide in the land of Troy, vexing thee and thy children. And of thee, old sire, we hear that of old thou wast blest; how of all that toward the sea Lesbos, the seat of Macar, encloseth 24.544. /Howbeit even upon him the gods brought evil, in that there nowise sprang up in his halls offspring of princely sons, but he begat one only son, doomed to an untimely fate. Neither may I tend him as he groweth old, seeing that far, far from mine own country I abide in the land of Troy, vexing thee and thy children. And of thee, old sire, we hear that of old thou wast blest; how of all that toward the sea Lesbos, the seat of Macar, encloseth 24.545. /and Phrygia in the upland, and the boundless Hellespont, over all these folk, men say, thou, old sire, wast preeminent by reason of thy wealth and thy sons. Howbeit from the time when the heavenly gods brought upon thee this bane, ever around thy city are battles and slayings of men. Bear thou up, neither wail ever ceaselessly in thy heart; for naught wilt thou avail by grieving for thy son 24.546. /and Phrygia in the upland, and the boundless Hellespont, over all these folk, men say, thou, old sire, wast preeminent by reason of thy wealth and thy sons. Howbeit from the time when the heavenly gods brought upon thee this bane, ever around thy city are battles and slayings of men. Bear thou up, neither wail ever ceaselessly in thy heart; for naught wilt thou avail by grieving for thy son 24.547. /and Phrygia in the upland, and the boundless Hellespont, over all these folk, men say, thou, old sire, wast preeminent by reason of thy wealth and thy sons. Howbeit from the time when the heavenly gods brought upon thee this bane, ever around thy city are battles and slayings of men. Bear thou up, neither wail ever ceaselessly in thy heart; for naught wilt thou avail by grieving for thy son 24.548. /and Phrygia in the upland, and the boundless Hellespont, over all these folk, men say, thou, old sire, wast preeminent by reason of thy wealth and thy sons. Howbeit from the time when the heavenly gods brought upon thee this bane, ever around thy city are battles and slayings of men. Bear thou up, neither wail ever ceaselessly in thy heart; for naught wilt thou avail by grieving for thy son 24.549. /and Phrygia in the upland, and the boundless Hellespont, over all these folk, men say, thou, old sire, wast preeminent by reason of thy wealth and thy sons. Howbeit from the time when the heavenly gods brought upon thee this bane, ever around thy city are battles and slayings of men. Bear thou up, neither wail ever ceaselessly in thy heart; for naught wilt thou avail by grieving for thy son 24.550. /neither wilt thou bring him back to life; ere that shalt thou suffer some other ill. 24.551. /neither wilt thou bring him back to life; ere that shalt thou suffer some other ill.
9. Homer, Odyssey, 1.1, 4.236-4.237, 4.561-4.562, 8.62-8.63, 8.335-8.342, 11.300-11.301, 11.488-11.489, 11.576-11.602, 18.130-18.131, 20.199-20.203 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

10. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1004 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1004. Ever will sickness lean;
11. Pindar, Isthmian Odes, 5.52 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Theognis, Elegies, 155-158, 165-166, 171-172, 230-232, 425-426, 463-464, 591-592, 133 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 1350-1360, 1349 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

379a. but founders of a state. And to founders it pertains to know the patterns on which poets must compose their fables and from which their poems must not be allowed to deviate; but the founders are not required themselves to compose fables. Right, he said; but this very thing—the patterns or norms of right speech about the gods, what would they be? Something like this, I said. The true quality of God we must always surely attribute to him whether we compose in epic, melic, or tragic verse. We must. And is not God of course good in reality
15. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

16. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 1.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.5. And I will begin first with that with which it is necessary to begin. Moses was by birth a Hebrew, but he was born, and brought up, and educated in Egypt, his ancestors having migrated into Egypt with all their families on account of the long famine which oppressed Babylon and all the adjacent countries; for they were in search of food, and Egypt was a champaign country blessed with a rich soil, and very productive of every thing which the nature of man requires, and especially of corn and wheat
17. Vergil, Aeneis, 10.825, 12.8, 12.82, 12.791-12.842, 12.931-12.933, 12.940-12.949, 12.951 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10.825. thy stern command? If I could claim to-day 12.8. unto his last grim fight, and gloriously 12.82. from these new terms of duel, wept aloud 12.791. dissension 'twixt the frighted citizens: 12.792. ome would give o'er the city and fling wide 12.793. its portals to the Trojan, or drag forth 12.794. the King himself to parley; others fly 12.795. to arms, and at the rampart make a stand. 12.796. 'T is thus some shepherd from a caverned crag 12.797. tirs up the nested bees with plenteous fume 12.798. of bitter smoke; they, posting to and fro 12.799. fly desperate round the waxen citadel 12.800. and whet their buzzing fury; through their halls 12.801. the stench and blackness rolls; within the caves 12.802. noise and confusion ring; the fatal cloud 12.804. But now a new adversity befell 12.805. the weary Latins, which with common woe 12.806. hook the whole city to its heart. The Queen 12.807. when at her hearth she saw the close assault 12.808. of enemies, the walls beset, and fire 12.809. preading from roof to roof, but no defence 12.810. from the Rutulian arms, nor front of war 12.811. with Turnus leading,—she, poor soul, believed 12.812. her youthful champion in the conflict slain; 12.813. and, mad with sudden sorrow, shrieked aloud 12.814. against herself, the guilty chief and cause 12.815. of all this ill; and, babbling her wild woe 12.816. in endless words, she rent her purple pall 12.817. and with her own hand from the rafter swung 12.818. a noose for her foul death. The tidings dire 12.819. among the moaning wives of Latium spread 12.820. and young Lavinia's frantic fingers tore 12.821. her rose-red cheek and hyacinthine hair. 12.822. Then all her company of women shrieked 12.823. in anguish, and the wailing echoed far 12.824. along the royal seat; from whence the tale 12.825. of sorrow through the peopled city flew; 12.826. hearts sank; Latinus rent his robes, appalled 12.827. to see his consort's doom, his falling throne; 12.829. Meanwhile the warrior Turnus far afield 12.830. pursued a scattered few; but less his speed 12.831. for less and less his worn steeds worked his will; 12.832. and now wind-wafted to his straining ear 12.833. a nameless horror came, a dull, wild roar 12.834. the city's tumult and distressful cry. 12.835. “Alack,” he cried, “what stirs in yonder walls 12.836. uch anguish? Or why rings from side to side 12.837. uch wailing through the city?” Asking so 12.838. he tightened frantic grasp upon the rein. 12.839. To him his sister, counterfeiting still 12.840. the charioteer Metiscus, while she swayed 12.841. rein, steeds, and chariot, this answer made: 12.842. “Hither, my Turnus, let our arms pursue 12.931. o through the scattered legions Turnus ran 12.932. traight to the city walls, where all the ground 12.933. was drenched with blood, and every passing air 12.941. But Sire Aeneas, hearing Turnus' name 12.942. down the steep rampart from the citadel 12.943. unlingering tried, all lesser task laid by 12.944. with joy exultant and dread-thundering arms. 12.945. Like Athos ' crest he loomed, or soaring top 12.946. of Eryx, when the nodding oaks resound 12.947. or sovereign Apennine that lifts in air 12.948. his forehead of triumphant snow. All eyes 12.949. of Troy, Rutulia, and Italy 12.951. on lofty rampart, or in siege below


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abram/abraham, faith and doubt of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 458
achilles, anger of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
achilles/akhilleus Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 36
achilles Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 228; Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 359; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 36; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 397
aeneas, anger of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
aeschylus Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95, 142
agamemnon Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 241; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 36
allegory, allegorical interpretation, two jars Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 142
allegory, allegorical interpretation Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95, 142
angels Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 359
anger, epicurean view Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
anger, stoic view Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
anger of achilles Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
aurelius, marcus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
catalogue, in homer Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 36
chance Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 359
chthonic deities de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 397
condicio heroica Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 27
death Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 7
delphi de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 397
disease Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 7
divine intervention Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 36
doubt Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 458
dream de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 397
egypt Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 359
elegy Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 241
epic poetry, roman Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
epictetus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
epicurean philosophy Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
epigrams, by sophists Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 241
ethnography Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 36
euripides Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 228
evil, god as source Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95, 142
exegesis de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 397
faith Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 458
gifts Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 36
gill, christopher Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
hades, place de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 397
hadrian, hadrian, arch of Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 241
hector, achilles anger at Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
hector Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 36
hellenistic philosophy, ideas about anger Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
hera, in cult Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 228
hera Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 36
heracles Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 228
hermes de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 397
herodes atticus, poetry Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 241
herodotus Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 228
heroic ideal Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 36
hesiod Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95, 142
homer, allegory of the jars Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95, 142
homer, comparison of iliad with odyssey Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 27
homer, god source of good and evil Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95, 142
homer, iliad Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 241
homer Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 36; Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 7; Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 27; Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95, 142
iliad Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 359
intentionality Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 36
italy/italian Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
jars, allegory of Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95, 142
journey de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 397
judaism, acceptance of hellenism Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 142
judaism, moses as chaldean Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95
judaism in egypt, ps.-orpheus Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95
juno, anger of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
katabasis, kathodos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 397
lausus Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
life de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 397
madness Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 7
meleager Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 228
memory Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 36
menander Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95, 142
mimnermus Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95, 142
moses, chaldean Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95
numbers Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 36
objective attitudes Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
odysseus, and heroism Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 228
odyssey Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 359
oracles, delphi de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 397
oracles de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 397
orpheus, inability to see god Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95
orpheus, literary author de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 397
orpheus Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95
pallas, death of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
patroclus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 36
peleus Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 228; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 36
peripatetic philosophy Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
philo of alexandria Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95
physis de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 397
pindar Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 228; Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95, 142
pity, of aeneas Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
piyut Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 359
plato, god not source of evil Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 142
plato Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 142
platonism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 458
polydeucion Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 241
priam, embassy to achilles Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
priam Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 228; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 36
ps.-orpheus, general profile Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95
ps.-orpheus, good and evil Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 142
ps.-orpheus, recension c Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95
ps.-orpheus, recensional history Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95
ps.-orpheus, recensions Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95
ps.-orpheus, riedweg, c. Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95
ps.-orpheus Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95
rationality, reactive attitudes Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
regilla, wife of herodes atticus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 241
revenge, and aeneas Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
seeing god, moses Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95
seeing god, orpheus Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95
seeing god Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95
sophists, imperial Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 241
sophocles Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 228
speech de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 397
speeches in thucydides (generally), and ancient vs. modern assumptions Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 87
speeches in thucydides (generally), and homeric model Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 87
speeches in thucydides (generally), and objectivity Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 87
speeches in thucydides (generally) Joho, Style and Necessity in Thucydides (2022) 87
stoic philosophy Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
supplication de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 397
symbol Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 36
theodicy Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 27
theognis Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95, 142
time Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 458
trojan war, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 36
troy/trojans, victims of junos anger Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
troy Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 36; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 36
turnus, death of Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
virgil, and hellenistic philosophy Braund and Most, Ancient Anger: Perspectives from Homer to Galen (2004) 227
virtue' Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 458
zeus, ps.-orpheus Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 95
zeus, two jars Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 142
zeus Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 228; Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 359; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 36; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 397
τύχη Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 359