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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6677
Homer, Iliad, 24.1-24.12
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nanThen was the gathering broken up, and the folk scattered, each man to go to his own ship. The rest bethought them of supper and of sweet sleep, to take their fill thereof; but Achilles wept, ever remembering his dear comrade, neither might sleep
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λῦτο δʼ ἀγών, λαοὶ δὲ θοὰς ἐπὶ νῆας ἕκαστοιThen was the gathering broken up, and the folk scattered, each man to go to his own ship. The rest bethought them of supper and of sweet sleep, to take their fill thereof; but Achilles wept, ever remembering his dear comrade, neither might sleep


ἄλλοτʼ ἐπὶ πλευρὰς κατακείμενος, ἄλλοτε δʼ αὖτεlying now upon his side, now upon his back, and now upon his face; and then again he would rise upon his feet and roam distraught along the shore of the sea. Neither would he fail to mark the Dawn, as she shone over the sea and the sea-beaches, but would yoke beneath the car his swift horses


ὕπτιος, ἄλλοτε δὲ πρηνής· τοτὲ δʼ ὀρθὸς ἀναστὰςlying now upon his side, now upon his back, and now upon his face; and then again he would rise upon his feet and roam distraught along the shore of the sea. Neither would he fail to mark the Dawn, as she shone over the sea and the sea-beaches, but would yoke beneath the car his swift horses


δινεύεσκʼ ἀλύων παρὰ θῖνʼ ἁλός· οὐδέ μιν ἠὼςlying now upon his side, now upon his back, and now upon his face; and then again he would rise upon his feet and roam distraught along the shore of the sea. Neither would he fail to mark the Dawn, as she shone over the sea and the sea-beaches, but would yoke beneath the car his swift horses


ἐσκίδναντʼ ἰέναι. τοὶ μὲν δόρποιο μέδοντοThen was the gathering broken up, and the folk scattered, each man to go to his own ship. The rest bethought them of supper and of sweet sleep, to take their fill thereof; but Achilles wept, ever remembering his dear comrade, neither might sleep


ὕπνου τε γλυκεροῦ ταρπήμεναι· αὐτὰρ ἈχιλλεὺςThen was the gathering broken up, and the folk scattered, each man to go to his own ship. The rest bethought them of supper and of sweet sleep, to take their fill thereof; but Achilles wept, ever remembering his dear comrade, neither might sleep


κλαῖε φίλου ἑτάρου μεμνημένος, οὐδέ μιν ὕπνοςThen was the gathering broken up, and the folk scattered, each man to go to his own ship. The rest bethought them of supper and of sweet sleep, to take their fill thereof; but Achilles wept, ever remembering his dear comrade, neither might sleep


ᾕρει πανδαμάτωρ, ἀλλʼ ἐστρέφετʼ ἔνθα καὶ ἔνθαThen was the gathering broken up, and the folk scattered, each man to go to his own ship. The rest bethought them of supper and of sweet sleep, to take their fill thereof; but Achilles wept, ever remembering his dear comrade, neither might sleep


ᾕρει πανδαμάτωρ, ἀλλʼ ἐστρέφετʼ ἔνθα καὶ ἔνθαthat mastereth all, lay hold of him, but he turned him ever to this side or to that, yearning for the man-hood and valorous might of Patroclus, thinking on all he had wrought with him and all the woes he had borne, passing though wars of men and the grievous waves. Thinking thereon he would shed big tears


Πατρόκλου ποθέων ἀνδροτῆτά τε καὶ μένος ἠΰthat mastereth all, lay hold of him, but he turned him ever to this side or to that, yearning for the man-hood and valorous might of Patroclus, thinking on all he had wrought with him and all the woes he had borne, passing though wars of men and the grievous waves. Thinking thereon he would shed big tears


ἠδʼ ὁπόσα τολύπευσε σὺν αὐτῷ καὶ πάθεν ἄλγεαthat mastereth all, lay hold of him, but he turned him ever to this side or to that, yearning for the man-hood and valorous might of Patroclus, thinking on all he had wrought with him and all the woes he had borne, passing though wars of men and the grievous waves. Thinking thereon he would shed big tears


ἀνδρῶν τε πτολέμους ἀλεγεινά τε κύματα πείρων·that mastereth all, lay hold of him, but he turned him ever to this side or to that, yearning for the man-hood and valorous might of Patroclus, thinking on all he had wrought with him and all the woes he had borne, passing though wars of men and the grievous waves. Thinking thereon he would shed big tears


τῶν μιμνησκόμενος θαλερὸν κατὰ δάκρυον εἶβενthat mastereth all, lay hold of him, but he turned him ever to this side or to that, yearning for the man-hood and valorous might of Patroclus, thinking on all he had wrought with him and all the woes he had borne, passing though wars of men and the grievous waves. Thinking thereon he would shed big tears


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

2 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.496, 9.259, 11.790, 19.324-19.325, 24.2-24.12, 24.14-24.18 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.496. /with horse-hair crest; and his dear wife went forthwith to her house, oft turning back, and shedding big tears. Presently she came to the well-built palace of man-slaying Hector and found therein her many handmaidens; and among them all she roused lamentation. 9.259. /give thee if they be so minded, but do thou curb thy proud spirit in thy breast, for gentle-mindedness is the better part; and withdraw thee from strife, contriver of mischief, that so the Argives both young and old may honour thee the more.’ On this wise did that old man charge thee, but thou forgettest. Yet do thou lease even now 11.790. /Thus did the old man charge thee, but thou forgettest. Yet even now at the last do thou speak thus to wise-hearted Achilles, if so be he may hearken. Who knows but that heaven helping thou mightest rouse his spirit with thy persuading? A good thing is the persuasion of a friend. But if in his heart he is shunning some oracle 19.324. /will have naught of meat and drink, though they be here at hand, through yearning for thee. Naught more grievous than this could I suffer, not though I should hear of the death of mine own father, who now haply in Phthia is shedding round tears for lack of a son like me, while I in a land of alien folk 19.325. /for the sake of abhorred Helen am warring with the men of Troy; nay, nor though it were he that in Scyrus is reared for me, my son well-beloved —if so be godlike Neoptolemus still liveth. For until now the heart in my breast had hope that I alone should perish far from horse-pasturing Argos 24.2. /Then was the gathering broken up, and the folk scattered, each man to go to his own ship. The rest bethought them of supper and of sweet sleep, to take their fill thereof; but Achilles wept, ever remembering his dear comrade, neither might sleep 24.3. /Then was the gathering broken up, and the folk scattered, each man to go to his own ship. The rest bethought them of supper and of sweet sleep, to take their fill thereof; but Achilles wept, ever remembering his dear comrade, neither might sleep 24.4. /Then was the gathering broken up, and the folk scattered, each man to go to his own ship. The rest bethought them of supper and of sweet sleep, to take their fill thereof; but Achilles wept, ever remembering his dear comrade, neither might sleep 24.5. /Then was the gathering broken up, and the folk scattered, each man to go to his own ship. The rest bethought them of supper and of sweet sleep, to take their fill thereof; but Achilles wept, ever remembering his dear comrade, neither might sleep 24.5. /that mastereth all, lay hold of him, but he turned him ever to this side or to that, yearning for the man-hood and valorous might of Patroclus, thinking on all he had wrought with him and all the woes he had borne, passing though wars of men and the grievous waves. Thinking thereon he would shed big tears 24.6. /that mastereth all, lay hold of him, but he turned him ever to this side or to that, yearning for the man-hood and valorous might of Patroclus, thinking on all he had wrought with him and all the woes he had borne, passing though wars of men and the grievous waves. Thinking thereon he would shed big tears 24.7. /that mastereth all, lay hold of him, but he turned him ever to this side or to that, yearning for the man-hood and valorous might of Patroclus, thinking on all he had wrought with him and all the woes he had borne, passing though wars of men and the grievous waves. Thinking thereon he would shed big tears 24.8. /that mastereth all, lay hold of him, but he turned him ever to this side or to that, yearning for the man-hood and valorous might of Patroclus, thinking on all he had wrought with him and all the woes he had borne, passing though wars of men and the grievous waves. Thinking thereon he would shed big tears 24.9. /that mastereth all, lay hold of him, but he turned him ever to this side or to that, yearning for the man-hood and valorous might of Patroclus, thinking on all he had wrought with him and all the woes he had borne, passing though wars of men and the grievous waves. Thinking thereon he would shed big tears 24.10. /lying now upon his side, now upon his back, and now upon his face; and then again he would rise upon his feet and roam distraught along the shore of the sea. Neither would he fail to mark the Dawn, as she shone over the sea and the sea-beaches, but would yoke beneath the car his swift horses 24.11. /lying now upon his side, now upon his back, and now upon his face; and then again he would rise upon his feet and roam distraught along the shore of the sea. Neither would he fail to mark the Dawn, as she shone over the sea and the sea-beaches, but would yoke beneath the car his swift horses 24.12. /lying now upon his side, now upon his back, and now upon his face; and then again he would rise upon his feet and roam distraught along the shore of the sea. Neither would he fail to mark the Dawn, as she shone over the sea and the sea-beaches, but would yoke beneath the car his swift horses 24.14. /lying now upon his side, now upon his back, and now upon his face; and then again he would rise upon his feet and roam distraught along the shore of the sea. Neither would he fail to mark the Dawn, as she shone over the sea and the sea-beaches, but would yoke beneath the car his swift horses 24.15. /and bind Hector behind the chariot to drag him withal; and when he had haled him thrice about the barrow of the dead son of Menoetius, he would rest again in his hut, but would leave Hector outstretched on his face in the dust. Howbeit Apollo kept all defacement from his flesh, pitying the warrior 24.16. /and bind Hector behind the chariot to drag him withal; and when he had haled him thrice about the barrow of the dead son of Menoetius, he would rest again in his hut, but would leave Hector outstretched on his face in the dust. Howbeit Apollo kept all defacement from his flesh, pitying the warrior 24.17. /and bind Hector behind the chariot to drag him withal; and when he had haled him thrice about the barrow of the dead son of Menoetius, he would rest again in his hut, but would leave Hector outstretched on his face in the dust. Howbeit Apollo kept all defacement from his flesh, pitying the warrior 24.18. /and bind Hector behind the chariot to drag him withal; and when he had haled him thrice about the barrow of the dead son of Menoetius, he would rest again in his hut, but would leave Hector outstretched on his face in the dust. Howbeit Apollo kept all defacement from his flesh, pitying the warrior
2. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.198-1.207, 4.333-4.336 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.198. and glides light-wheeled along the crested foam. 1.199. As when, with not unwonted tumult, roars 1.200. in some vast city a rebellious mob 1.201. and base-born passions in its bosom burn 1.202. till rocks and blazing torches fill the air 1.203. (rage never lacks for arms)—if haply then 1.204. ome wise man comes, whose reverend looks attest 1.205. a life to duty given, swift silence falls; 1.206. all ears are turned attentive; and he sways 1.207. with clear and soothing speech the people's will. 4.333. to his own honor speak not; can the sire 4.334. begrudge Ascanius the heritage 4.335. of the proud name of Rome ? What plans he now? 4.336. What mad hope bids him linger in the lap


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 302, 303; Thorsen et al., Greek and Latin Love: The Poetic Connection (2021) 29, 30
allusion Thorsen et al., Greek and Latin Love: The Poetic Connection (2021) 29
andromache Thorsen et al., Greek and Latin Love: The Poetic Connection (2021) 30
callimachus Thorsen et al., Greek and Latin Love: The Poetic Connection (2021) 29
dido Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 303
epic Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 303
hector Thorsen et al., Greek and Latin Love: The Poetic Connection (2021) 30
homer Thorsen et al., Greek and Latin Love: The Poetic Connection (2021) 29, 30
intertextuality Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 303
memory Thorsen et al., Greek and Latin Love: The Poetic Connection (2021) 30
mourning Thorsen et al., Greek and Latin Love: The Poetic Connection (2021) 30
patroclus Thorsen et al., Greek and Latin Love: The Poetic Connection (2021) 29, 30
peleus Thorsen et al., Greek and Latin Love: The Poetic Connection (2021) 30
sleeplessness' Thorsen et al., Greek and Latin Love: The Poetic Connection (2021) 30