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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6677
Homer, Iliad, 16.684-16.685


Πάτροκλος δʼ ἵπποισι καὶ Αὐτομέδοντι κελεύσαςand anointed him with ambrosia, and clothed him about with immortal raiment, and gave him to swift conveyers to bear with them, even to the twin brethren, Sleep and Death, who set him speedily in the rich land of wide Lycia.But Patroclus with a call to his horses and to Automedon


Τρῶας καὶ Λυκίους μετεκίαθε, καὶ μέγʼ ἀάσθηpressed after the Trojans and Lycians, and was greatly blinded in heart, fool that he was! for had he observed the word of the son of Peleus, he would verily have escaped the evil fate of black death. But ever is the intent of Zeus stronger than that of men, for he driveth even a valiant man in rout, and robbeth him of victory


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

2 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 9.113, 9.423-9.424, 9.512, 16.39, 16.96, 16.685-16.688, 16.805, 17.201-17.203, 22.395-22.396, 24.349-24.351, 24.476-24.477 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

9.113. /and upon a man most mighty, whom the very immortals honoured, didst thou put dishonour; for thou tookest away and keepest his prize. Howbeit let us still even now take thought how we may make amends, and persuade him with kindly gifts and with gentle words. 9.423. /hold forth his hand above her, and her people are filled with courage. But go ye your way and declare my message to the chieftains of the Achaeans—for that is the office of elders—to the end that they may devise some other plan in their minds better than this, even such as shall save their ships, and the host of the Achaeans 9.424. /hold forth his hand above her, and her people are filled with courage. But go ye your way and declare my message to the chieftains of the Achaeans—for that is the office of elders—to the end that they may devise some other plan in their minds better than this, even such as shall save their ships, and the host of the Achaeans 9.512. /but if a man denieth them and stubbornly refuseth, then they go their way and make prayer to Zeus, son of Cronos, that Ate may follow after such a one to the end that he may fall and pay full atonement. Nay, Achilles, see thou too that reverence attend upon the daughters of Zeus, even such as bendeth the hearts of all men that are upright. 16.39. /and the beetling cliffs, for that thy heart is unbending. But if in thy mind thou art shunning some oracle, and thy queenly mother hath declared to thee aught from Zeus, yet me at least send thou forth speedily, and with me let the rest of the host of the Myrmidons follow, if so be I may prove a light of deliverance to the Danaans. 16.96. /Nay, return thou back, when once thou hast set a light of deliverance amid the ships, and suffer the rest to battle over the plain. For I would, O father Zeus, and Athene, and Apollo, that no man of the Trojans might escape death, of all that there are, neither any of the Argives, but that we twain might escape destruction 16.685. /pressed after the Trojans and Lycians, and was greatly blinded in heart, fool that he was! for had he observed the word of the son of Peleus, he would verily have escaped the evil fate of black death. But ever is the intent of Zeus stronger than that of men, for he driveth even a valiant man in rout, and robbeth him of victory 16.686. /pressed after the Trojans and Lycians, and was greatly blinded in heart, fool that he was! for had he observed the word of the son of Peleus, he would verily have escaped the evil fate of black death. But ever is the intent of Zeus stronger than that of men, for he driveth even a valiant man in rout, and robbeth him of victory 16.687. /pressed after the Trojans and Lycians, and was greatly blinded in heart, fool that he was! for had he observed the word of the son of Peleus, he would verily have escaped the evil fate of black death. But ever is the intent of Zeus stronger than that of men, for he driveth even a valiant man in rout, and robbeth him of victory 16.688. /pressed after the Trojans and Lycians, and was greatly blinded in heart, fool that he was! for had he observed the word of the son of Peleus, he would verily have escaped the evil fate of black death. But ever is the intent of Zeus stronger than that of men, for he driveth even a valiant man in rout, and robbeth him of victory 16.805. /Then blindness seized his mind, and his glorious limbs were loosed beneath him, and he stood in a daze; and from behind him from close at hand a Dardanian smote him upon the back between the shoulders with a cast of his sharp spear, even Panthous' son, Euphorbus, that excelled all men of his years in casting the spear, and in horsemanship, and in speed of foot; and lo, twenty warriors had he already cast 17.201. /he shook his head, and thus he spake unto his own heart:Ah, poor wretch, death verily is not in thy thoughts, that yet draweth nigh thee; but thou art putting upon thee the immortal armour of a princely man before whom others besides thee are wont to quail. His comrade, kindly and valiant, hast thou slain 17.202. /he shook his head, and thus he spake unto his own heart:Ah, poor wretch, death verily is not in thy thoughts, that yet draweth nigh thee; but thou art putting upon thee the immortal armour of a princely man before whom others besides thee are wont to quail. His comrade, kindly and valiant, hast thou slain 17.203. /he shook his head, and thus he spake unto his own heart:Ah, poor wretch, death verily is not in thy thoughts, that yet draweth nigh thee; but thou art putting upon thee the immortal armour of a princely man before whom others besides thee are wont to quail. His comrade, kindly and valiant, hast thou slain 22.395. /He spake, and devised foul entreatment for goodly Hector. The tendons of both his feet behind he pierced from heel to ankle, and made fast therethrough thongs of oxhide, and bound them to his chariot, but left the head to trail. Then when he had mounted his car and had lifted therein the glorious armour 22.396. /He spake, and devised foul entreatment for goodly Hector. The tendons of both his feet behind he pierced from heel to ankle, and made fast therethrough thongs of oxhide, and bound them to his chariot, but left the head to trail. Then when he had mounted his car and had lifted therein the glorious armour 24.349. /With this in his hand the strong Argeiphontes flew, and quickly came to Troy-land and the Hellespont. Then went he his way in the likeness of a young man that is a prince, with the first down upon his lip, in whom the charm of youth is fairest.Now when the others had driven past the great barrow of Ilus 24.350. /they halted the mules and the horses in the river to drink; for darkness was by now come down over the earth. Then the herald looked and was ware of Hermes hard at hand, and he spake to Priam, saying:Bethink thee, son of Dardanus 24.351. /they halted the mules and the horses in the river to drink; for darkness was by now come down over the earth. Then the herald looked and was ware of Hermes hard at hand, and he spake to Priam, saying:Bethink thee, son of Dardanus 24.476. /waited busily upon him; and he was newly ceased from meat, even from eating and drinking, and the table yet stood by his side. Unseen of these great Priam entered in, and coming close to Achilles, clasped in his hands his knees, and kissed his hands, the terrible, man-slaying hands that had slain his many sons. 24.477. /waited busily upon him; and he was newly ceased from meat, even from eating and drinking, and the table yet stood by his side. Unseen of these great Priam entered in, and coming close to Achilles, clasped in his hands his knees, and kissed his hands, the terrible, man-slaying hands that had slain his many sons.
2. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 35.114, 35.139 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
(river) Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 204
achilles, and agamemnon Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 31
achilles Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
agamemnon, and achilles Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 31
apollo Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 204
atē Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 31
briseis Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 31
burial Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 204
death Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 204
dining Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
evening Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
frescoes Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
glaucus (hero) Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 204
hector Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
hektor Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 31
heracles/hercules Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
homer, comparison of iliad with odyssey Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 30
homer, iliad Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
homer Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 30
iliad Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 31
knowledge, and character' Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 31
landmarks Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 204
laomedon Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
lycia Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 204
memnon Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 204
nestor Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 31
night/nighttime, experience of Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
nymphs Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 204
obsequens, octavius quartio, house of Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
odysseus Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
painting Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
paphlagoneios Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 204
patroklos Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 31
phoenix Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
phoinix Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 31
pompeii Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
porticus of octavia Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
priam Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
quintus of smyrna, and apollonius argonautica Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 204
quintus of smyrna, and supernatural landmarks Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 204
rivers Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 204
sarpedon Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 204
theodicy Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 30
tombs, eetion Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 204
tombs Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 204
trojan war Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
troy/trojans Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 293
zeus Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 204