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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6677
Homer, Iliad, 13.6


γλακτοφάγων Ἀβίων τε δικαιοτάτων ἀνθρώπων.and of the Mysians that fight in close combat, and of the lordly Hippemolgi that drink the milk of mares, and of the Abii, the most righteous of men. To Troy he no longer in any wise turned his bright eyes, for he deemed not in his heart that any of the immortals would draw nigh to aid either Trojans or Danaans.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Archilochus, Fragments, 42 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Archilochus, Fragments, 42 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Homer, Iliad, 1.508-1.510, 2.142, 3.395-3.399, 3.427, 3.447, 8.5-8.17, 13.3-13.5, 13.7-13.9, 21.415 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.508. /yet now Agamemnon, king of men, has dishonoured him, for he has taken and keeps his prize by his own arrogant act. But honour him, Olympian Zeus, lord of counsel; and give might to the Trojans, until the Achaeans do honour to my son, and magnify him with recompense. 1.509. /yet now Agamemnon, king of men, has dishonoured him, for he has taken and keeps his prize by his own arrogant act. But honour him, Olympian Zeus, lord of counsel; and give might to the Trojans, until the Achaeans do honour to my son, and magnify him with recompense. 1.510. /So she spoke; but Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, spoke no word to her, but sat a long time in silence. Yet Thetis, even as she had clasped his knees, so held to him, clinging close, and questioned him again a second time:Give me your infallible promise, and bow your head to it, or else deny me, for there is nothing to make you afraid; so that I may know well 2.142. /let us flee with our ships to our dear native land; for no more is there hope that we shall take broad-wayed Troy. So spake he, and roused the hearts in the breasts of all throughout the multitude, as many as had not heard the council. And the gathering was stirred like the long sea-waves of the Icarian main 3.395. /So spake she, and stirred Helen's heart in her breast; and when she marked the beauteous neck of the goddess, her lovely bosom, and her flashing eyes, then amazement seized her, and she spake, and addressed her, saying:Strange goddess, why art thou minded to beguile me thus? 3.396. /So spake she, and stirred Helen's heart in her breast; and when she marked the beauteous neck of the goddess, her lovely bosom, and her flashing eyes, then amazement seized her, and she spake, and addressed her, saying:Strange goddess, why art thou minded to beguile me thus? 3.397. /So spake she, and stirred Helen's heart in her breast; and when she marked the beauteous neck of the goddess, her lovely bosom, and her flashing eyes, then amazement seized her, and she spake, and addressed her, saying:Strange goddess, why art thou minded to beguile me thus? 3.398. /So spake she, and stirred Helen's heart in her breast; and when she marked the beauteous neck of the goddess, her lovely bosom, and her flashing eyes, then amazement seized her, and she spake, and addressed her, saying:Strange goddess, why art thou minded to beguile me thus? 3.399. /So spake she, and stirred Helen's heart in her breast; and when she marked the beauteous neck of the goddess, her lovely bosom, and her flashing eyes, then amazement seized her, and she spake, and addressed her, saying:Strange goddess, why art thou minded to beguile me thus? 3.427. /and set it before the face of Alexander. Thereon Helen sate her down, the daughter of Zeus that beareth the aegis, with eyes turned askance; and she chid her lord, and said:Thou hast come back from the war; would thou hadst perished there, vanquished by a valiant man that was my former lord. 3.447. /and on the isle of Cranae had dalliance with thee on the couch of love—as now I love thee, and sweet desire layeth hold of me. He spake, and led the way to the couch, and with him followed his wife.Thus the twain were couched upon the corded bed; but the son of Atreus ranged through the throng like a wild beast 8.5. /Now Dawn the saffron-robed was spreading over the face of all the earth, and Zeus that hurleth the thunderbolt made a gathering of the gods upon the topmost peak of many-ridged Olympus, and himself addressed their gathering; and all the gods gave ear: 8.5. / Hearken unto me, all ye gods and goddesses, that I may speak what the heart in my breast biddeth me. Let not any goddess nor yet any god essay this thing, to thwart my word, but do ye all alike assent thereto, that with all speed I may bring these deeds to pass. 8.6. / Hearken unto me, all ye gods and goddesses, that I may speak what the heart in my breast biddeth me. Let not any goddess nor yet any god essay this thing, to thwart my word, but do ye all alike assent thereto, that with all speed I may bring these deeds to pass. 8.7. / Hearken unto me, all ye gods and goddesses, that I may speak what the heart in my breast biddeth me. Let not any goddess nor yet any god essay this thing, to thwart my word, but do ye all alike assent thereto, that with all speed I may bring these deeds to pass. 8.8. / Hearken unto me, all ye gods and goddesses, that I may speak what the heart in my breast biddeth me. Let not any goddess nor yet any god essay this thing, to thwart my word, but do ye all alike assent thereto, that with all speed I may bring these deeds to pass. 8.9. / Hearken unto me, all ye gods and goddesses, that I may speak what the heart in my breast biddeth me. Let not any goddess nor yet any god essay this thing, to thwart my word, but do ye all alike assent thereto, that with all speed I may bring these deeds to pass. 8.10. /Whomsoever I shall mark minded apart from the gods to go and bear aid either to Trojans or Danaans, smitten in no seemly wise shall he come back to Olympus, or I shall take and hurl him into murky Tartarus 8.11. /Whomsoever I shall mark minded apart from the gods to go and bear aid either to Trojans or Danaans, smitten in no seemly wise shall he come back to Olympus, or I shall take and hurl him into murky Tartarus 8.12. /Whomsoever I shall mark minded apart from the gods to go and bear aid either to Trojans or Danaans, smitten in no seemly wise shall he come back to Olympus, or I shall take and hurl him into murky Tartarus 8.13. /Whomsoever I shall mark minded apart from the gods to go and bear aid either to Trojans or Danaans, smitten in no seemly wise shall he come back to Olympus, or I shall take and hurl him into murky Tartarus 8.14. /Whomsoever I shall mark minded apart from the gods to go and bear aid either to Trojans or Danaans, smitten in no seemly wise shall he come back to Olympus, or I shall take and hurl him into murky Tartarus 8.15. /far, far away, where is the deepest gulf beneath the earth, the gates whereof are of iron and the threshold of bronze, as far beneath Hades as heaven is above earth: then shall ye know how far the mightiest am I of all gods. Nay, come, make trial, ye gods, that ye all may know. Make ye fast from heaven a chain of gold 8.16. /far, far away, where is the deepest gulf beneath the earth, the gates whereof are of iron and the threshold of bronze, as far beneath Hades as heaven is above earth: then shall ye know how far the mightiest am I of all gods. Nay, come, make trial, ye gods, that ye all may know. Make ye fast from heaven a chain of gold 8.17. /far, far away, where is the deepest gulf beneath the earth, the gates whereof are of iron and the threshold of bronze, as far beneath Hades as heaven is above earth: then shall ye know how far the mightiest am I of all gods. Nay, come, make trial, ye gods, that ye all may know. Make ye fast from heaven a chain of gold 13.3. /Now Zeus, when he had brought the Trojans and Hector to the ships, left the combatants there to have toil and woe unceasingly, but himself turned away his bright eyes, and looked afar, upon the land of the Thracian horsemen 13.4. /Now Zeus, when he had brought the Trojans and Hector to the ships, left the combatants there to have toil and woe unceasingly, but himself turned away his bright eyes, and looked afar, upon the land of the Thracian horsemen 13.5. /Now Zeus, when he had brought the Trojans and Hector to the ships, left the combatants there to have toil and woe unceasingly, but himself turned away his bright eyes, and looked afar, upon the land of the Thracian horsemen 13.5. /and of the Mysians that fight in close combat, and of the lordly Hippemolgi that drink the milk of mares, and of the Abii, the most righteous of men. To Troy he no longer in any wise turned his bright eyes, for he deemed not in his heart that any of the immortals would draw nigh to aid either Trojans or Danaans. 13.7. /and of the Mysians that fight in close combat, and of the lordly Hippemolgi that drink the milk of mares, and of the Abii, the most righteous of men. To Troy he no longer in any wise turned his bright eyes, for he deemed not in his heart that any of the immortals would draw nigh to aid either Trojans or Danaans. 13.8. /and of the Mysians that fight in close combat, and of the lordly Hippemolgi that drink the milk of mares, and of the Abii, the most righteous of men. To Troy he no longer in any wise turned his bright eyes, for he deemed not in his heart that any of the immortals would draw nigh to aid either Trojans or Danaans. 13.9. /and of the Mysians that fight in close combat, and of the lordly Hippemolgi that drink the milk of mares, and of the Abii, the most righteous of men. To Troy he no longer in any wise turned his bright eyes, for he deemed not in his heart that any of the immortals would draw nigh to aid either Trojans or Danaans. 21.415. /When she had thus spoken, she turned from Ares her bright eyes. Him then the daughter of Zeus, Aphrodite, took by the hand, and sought to lead away, as he uttered many a moan, and hardly could he gather back to him his spirit. But when the goddess, white-armed Hera, was ware of her, forthwith she spake winged words to Athene:
4. Homer, Odyssey, 1.23, 9.84, 9.197, 9.210-9.211, 9.219, 9.225-9.228, 9.231-9.234, 9.243, 9.250-9.416, 9.422, 9.430-9.432, 9.440-9.441, 9.453, 9.468, 9.475-9.479, 9.500, 9.508-9.510, 9.515, 9.524-9.535, 10.80-10.132 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5. Herodotus, Histories, 3.17-3.25, 4.23, 4.26, 4.65 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3.17. After this Cambyses planned three expeditions, against the Carchedonians, against the Ammonians, and against the “long-lived” Ethiopians, who inhabit that part of Libya that is on the southern sea. ,He decided after consideration to send his fleet against the Carthaginians and a part of his land army against the Ammonians; to Ethiopia he would first send spies, to see what truth there was in the story of a Table of the Sun in that country, and to spy out all else besides, under the pretext of bringing gifts for the Ethiopian king. 3.18. Now the Table of the Sun is said to be something of this kind: there is a meadow outside the city, filled with the boiled flesh of all four-footed things; here during the night the men of authority among the townsmen are careful to set out the meat, and all day whoever wishes comes and feasts on it. These meats, say the people of the country, are ever produced by the earth of itself. Such is the story of the Sun's Table. 3.19. When Cambyses determined to send the spies, he sent for those Fish-eaters from the city of Elephantine who understood the Ethiopian language. ,While they were fetching them, he ordered his fleet to sail against Carthage . But the Phoenicians said they would not do it; for they were bound, they said, by strong oaths, and if they sailed against their own progeny they would be doing an impious thing; and the Phoenicians being unwilling, the rest were inadequate fighters. ,Thus the Carthaginians escaped being enslaved by the Persians; for Cambyses would not use force with the Phoenicians, seeing that they had willingly surrendered to the Persians, and the whole fleet drew its strength from them. The Cyprians too had come of their own accord to aid the Persians against Egypt . 3.20. When the Fish-eaters arrived from Elephantine at Cambyses' summons, he sent them to Ethiopia, with orders what to say, and bearing as gifts a red cloak and a twisted gold necklace and bracelets and an alabaster box of incense and an earthenware jar of palm wine. These Ethiopians, to whom Cambyses sent them, are said to be the tallest and most handsome of all men. ,Their way of choosing kings is different from that of all others, as (it is said) are all their laws; they consider that man worthy to be their king whom they judge to be tallest and to have strength proportional to his stature. 3.21. When the Fish-eaters arrived among these men, they gave the gifts to their king and said: “Cambyses, the king of the Persians, wishing to become your friend and ally, sent us with orders to address ourselves to you; and he offers you as gifts these things which he enjoys using himself.” ,But the Ethiopian, perceiving that they had come as spies, spoke thus to them: “It is not because he values my friendship that the Persian King sends you with gifts, nor do you speak the truth (for you have come to spy on my realm), nor is that man just; for were he just, he would not have coveted a land other than his own, nor would he try to lead into slavery men by whom he has not been injured. Now, give him this bow, and this message: ,‘The King of the Ethiopians advises the King of the Persians to bring overwhelming odds to attack the long-lived Ethiopians when the Persians can draw a bow of this length as easily as I do; but until then, to thank the gods who do not incite the sons of the Ethiopians to add other land to their own.’” 3.22. So speaking he unstrung the bow and gave it to the men who had come. Then, taking the red cloak, he asked what it was and how it was made; and when the Fish-eaters told him the truth about the color and the process of dyeing, he said that both the men and their garments were full of deceit. ,Next he inquired about the twisted gold necklace and the bracelets; and when the Fish-eaters told him how they were made, the king smiled, and, thinking them to be fetters, said: “We have stronger chains than these.” ,Thirdly he inquired about the incense; and when they described making and applying it, he made the same reply as about the cloak. But when he came to the wine and asked about its making, he was vastly pleased with the drink, and asked further what food their king ate, and what was the greatest age to which a Persian lived. ,They told him their king ate bread, showing him how wheat grew; and said that the full age to which a man might hope to live was eighty years. Then, said the Ethiopian, it was no wonder that they lived so few years, if they ate dung; they would not even have been able to live that many unless they were refreshed by the drink—signifying to the Fish-eaters the wine—for in this, he said, the Persians excelled the Ethiopians. 3.23. The Fish-eaters then in turn asking of the Ethiopian length of life and diet, he said that most of them attained to a hundred and twenty years, and some even to more; their food was boiled meat and their drink milk. ,The spies showed wonder at the tale of years; whereupon he led them, it is said, to a spring, by washing in which they grew sleeker, as though it were of oil; and it smelled of violets. ,So light, the spies said, was this water, that nothing would float on it, neither wood nor anything lighter than wood, but all sank to the bottom. If this water is truly such as they say, it is likely that their constant use of it makes the people long-lived. ,When they left the spring, the king led them to a prison where all the men were bound with fetters of gold. Among these Ethiopians there is nothing so scarce and so precious as bronze. Then, having seen the prison, they saw what is called the Table of the Sun. 3.24. Last after this they viewed the Ethiopian coffins; these are said to be made of alabaster, as I shall describe: ,they cause the dead body to shrink, either as the Egyptians do or in some other way, then cover it with gypsum and paint it all as far as possible in the likeness of the living man; ,then they set it within a hollow pillar of alabaster, which they dig in abundance from the ground, and it is easily worked; the body can be seen in the pillar through the alabaster, no evil stench nor anything unpleasant proceeding from it, and showing clearly all its parts, as if it were the man himself. ,The nearest of kin keep the pillar in their house for a year, giving it of the first-fruits and offering it sacrifices; after which they bring the pillars out and set them round about the city. 3.25. Having seen everything, the spies departed again. When they reported all this, Cambyses was angry, and marched at once against the Ethiopians, neither giving directions for any provision of food nor considering that he was about to lead his army to the ends of the earth; ,being not in his right mind but mad, however, he marched at once on hearing from the Fish-eaters, ordering the Greeks who were with him to await him where they were, and taking with him all his land army. ,When he came in his march to Thebes , he detached about fifty thousand men from his army, and directed them to enslave the Ammonians and burn the oracle of Zeus; and he himself went on towards Ethiopia with the rest of his host. ,But before his army had accomplished the fifth part of their journey they had come to an end of all there was in the way of provision, and after the food was gone, they ate the beasts of burden until there was none of these left either. ,Now had Cambyses, when he perceived this, changed his mind and led his army back again, he would have been a wise man at last after his first fault; but as it was, he went ever forward, taking account of nothing. ,While his soldiers could get anything from the earth, they kept themselves alive by eating grass; but when they came to the sandy desert, some did a terrible thing, taking by lot one man out of ten and eating him. ,Hearing this, Cambyses feared their becoming cannibals, and so gave up his expedition against the Ethiopians and marched back to Thebes , with the loss of many of his army; from Thebes he came down to Memphis, and sent the Greeks to sail away. 4.23. As for the countryside of these Scythians, all the land mentioned up to this point is level and its soil deep; but thereafter it is stony and rough. ,After a long journey through this rough country, there are men inhabiting the foothills of high mountains, who are said to be bald from birth (male and female alike) and snub-nosed and with long beards; they speak their own language, and wear Scythian clothing, and their food comes from trees. ,The tree by which they live is called “Pontic”; it is about the size of a fig-tree, and bears a fruit as big as a bean, with a stone in it. When this fruit is ripe, they strain it through cloth, and a thick black liquid comes from it, which they call “aschu”; they lick this up or drink it mixed with milk, and from the thickest lees of it they make cakes, and eat them. ,They have few cattle, for the pasture in their land is not good. They each live under a tree, covering it in winter with a white felt cloth, but using no felt in summer. ,These people are wronged by no man, for they are said to be sacred; nor have they any weapon of war. They judge the quarrels between their neighbors; furthermore, whatever banished man has taken refuge with them is wronged by no one. They are called Argippeans. 4.26. It is said to be the custom of the Issedones that, whenever a man's father dies, all the nearest of kin bring beasts of the flock and, having killed these and cut up the flesh, they also cut up the dead father of their host, and set out all the flesh mixed together for a feast. ,As for his head, they strip it bare and clean and gild it, and keep it for a sacred relic, to which they offer solemn sacrifice yearly. Every son does this for his father, just like the Greeks in their festivals in honor of the dead. In other respects, these are said to be a law-abiding people, too, and the women to have equal power with the men. 4.65. The heads themselves, not all of them but those of their bitterest enemies, they treat this way. Each saws off all the part beneath the eyebrows, and cleans the rest. If he is a poor man, then he covers the outside with a piece of raw hide, and so makes use of it; but if he is rich, he covers the head with the raw hide, and gilds the inside of it and uses it for a drinking-cup. ,Such a cup a man also makes out of the head of his own kinsman with whom he has been feuding, and whom he has defeated in single combat before the king; and if guests whom he honors visit him he will serve them with these heads, and show how the dead were his kinsfolk who fought him and were beaten by him; this they call manly valor.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abioi Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209, 231, 250
ahriman Torok (2014), Herodotus In Nubia, 131
ambiguity,of emotions de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 57
amphimachus Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 38
aphrodite de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 57
apollo,aguieus Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209
apollo Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209
archive Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 231
aristarchus Taylor and Hay (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 155
aristonicus Taylor and Hay (2020), Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 155
artemis Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209
athena de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 57
boreads Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 257
boundary Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 257
callimachus Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209
cambyses Torok (2014), Herodotus In Nubia, 93, 131
canon Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209
cardinal points Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 257
cave Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 250
clifford,james Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 497
competition Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 250
cultural difference Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 231
de jong,irene Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 231
death Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 257
delos Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 231
delphi Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 231
diet,in ethnographic imagination Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 505
drunkenness Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 505
eagerness de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 57
eikos Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 257
ends of the earth Torok (2014), Herodotus In Nubia, 93
episkuros/epikoinos Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 38
epithets Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209
eschatology Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 73
ethnography,and ethical inquiry Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 505
ethnography,definition Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 497
ethnography Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 497, 505
expansion,expansionism Torok (2014), Herodotus In Nubia, 131
fantastic Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 257
flying Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 257
focalization de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 57
galeōtai Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209
gold Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 250
hector de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 57
helen de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 57
herodotus Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209
hesiod,catalogue of women Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 257
hippēmolgoi Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 231, 250
hobden,fiona Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 505
hodological space Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 231
homer,commensality in Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 505
homer Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209; Torok (2014), Herodotus In Nubia, 93
homeric hymn to apollo Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 231
iliad Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 250, 257
intertextuality Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 231
iris de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 57
issedones Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 257; Torok (2014), Herodotus In Nubia, 93, 131
ithaca Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 250
ivantchik,askold Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 231
justice Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209, 231, 250
kleos' Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 38
landscape Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 73, 250
limit Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 257
localism Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 231
long-lived aithiopians x Torok (2014), Herodotus In Nubia, 93, 131
memory of worlds Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209
menelaus de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 57
milk Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 231, 250
mysians Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 250
narratee de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 57
narrative manners and techniques Torok (2014), Herodotus In Nubia, 131
narrative unity of the histories Torok (2014), Herodotus In Nubia, 131
nomads Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 250
nostalgia de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 57
odyssey Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 250
opis and arge Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209
ormuz Torok (2014), Herodotus In Nubia, 131
oroskopia Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 257
paris/alexander of troy de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 57
persians,herodotus ethnography Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 505
perspective Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 257
poetry,ethnographic evidence in Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 505
poseidon Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 38
rationality Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 257
reversal Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 257
rhipaean mountains Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 250
river Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 257
said,edward Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 497
scholia Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 231
schöpperlin,johann friedrich Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 497
scorn de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 57
scythia,scythians Torok (2014), Herodotus In Nubia, 93, 131
soul Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 257
speech de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 57
spies Torok (2014), Herodotus In Nubia, 131
stephanus of byzantium Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209
symposia Wolfsdorf (2020), Early Greek Ethics, 505
telmesseis Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209
telmessos and galeōtēs Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209
themis Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209
themistō Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209
thetis Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 38
thrace Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 231, 250
total space Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 257
troy de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 57
utopia Torok (2014), Herodotus In Nubia, 93, 131
violence Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209, 231, 250
vom mythos zum logos Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 73
war Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 250
zabios Gagne (2021), Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece, 209
zeus Mcclellan (2019), Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola, 38; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 57
ἔσχατοι ἀνδρῶν (the most distant of men) Torok (2014), Herodotus In Nubia, 93