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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6677
Homer, Iliad, 1.3-1.4


πολλὰς δʼ ἰφθίμους ψυχὰς Ἄϊδι προΐαψενThe wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment


ἡρώων, αὐτοὺς δὲ ἑλώρια τεῦχε κύνεσσινThe wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

17 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 3.5 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3.5. כִּי יֹדֵעַ אֱלֹהִים כִּי בְּיוֹם אֲכָלְכֶם מִמֶּנּוּ וְנִפְקְחוּ עֵינֵיכֶם וִהְיִיתֶם כֵּאלֹהִים יֹדְעֵי טוֹב וָרָע׃ 3.5. for God doth know that in the day ye eat thereof, then your eyes shall be opened, and ye shall be as God, knowing good and evil.’"
2. Homer, Iliad, 1.1-1.2, 1.4-1.7, 1.44, 1.503-1.530, 2.323-2.329, 2.350-2.353, 4.164-4.165, 4.168, 5.222, 5.304, 9.413, 11.55, 23.65-23.92, 23.103-23.104, 23.187, 24.21, 24.51-24.54, 24.416-24.417 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.1. /The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment 1.2. /The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment 1.4. /The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment 1.5. /The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment 1.5. /from the time when first they parted in strife Atreus' son, king of men, and brilliant Achilles.Who then of the gods was it that brought these two together to contend? The son of Leto and Zeus; for he in anger against the king roused throughout the host an evil pestilence, and the people began to perish 1.6. /from the time when first they parted in strife Atreus' son, king of men, and brilliant Achilles.Who then of the gods was it that brought these two together to contend? The son of Leto and Zeus; for he in anger against the king roused throughout the host an evil pestilence, and the people began to perish 1.7. /from the time when first they parted in strife Atreus' son, king of men, and brilliant Achilles.Who then of the gods was it that brought these two together to contend? The son of Leto and Zeus; for he in anger against the king roused throughout the host an evil pestilence, and the people began to perish 1.44. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.503. /with her left hand, while with her right she touched him beneath the chin, and she spoke in prayer to king Zeus, son of Cronos:Father Zeus, if ever amid the immortals I gave you aid by word or deed, grant me this prayer: do honour to my son, who is doomed to a speedy death beyond all other men; 1.504. /with her left hand, while with her right she touched him beneath the chin, and she spoke in prayer to king Zeus, son of Cronos:Father Zeus, if ever amid the immortals I gave you aid by word or deed, grant me this prayer: do honour to my son, who is doomed to a speedy death beyond all other men; 1.505. /yet now Agamemnon, king of men, has dishonoured him, for he has taken and keeps his prize by his own arrogant act. But honour him, Olympian Zeus, lord of counsel; and give might to the Trojans, until the Achaeans do honour to my son, and magnify him with recompense. 1.506. /yet now Agamemnon, king of men, has dishonoured him, for he has taken and keeps his prize by his own arrogant act. But honour him, Olympian Zeus, lord of counsel; and give might to the Trojans, until the Achaeans do honour to my son, and magnify him with recompense. 1.507. /yet now Agamemnon, king of men, has dishonoured him, for he has taken and keeps his prize by his own arrogant act. But honour him, Olympian Zeus, lord of counsel; and give might to the Trojans, until the Achaeans do honour to my son, and magnify him with recompense. 1.508. /yet now Agamemnon, king of men, has dishonoured him, for he has taken and keeps his prize by his own arrogant act. But honour him, Olympian Zeus, lord of counsel; and give might to the Trojans, until the Achaeans do honour to my son, and magnify him with recompense. 1.509. /yet now Agamemnon, king of men, has dishonoured him, for he has taken and keeps his prize by his own arrogant act. But honour him, Olympian Zeus, lord of counsel; and give might to the Trojans, until the Achaeans do honour to my son, and magnify him with recompense. 1.510. /So she spoke; but Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, spoke no word to her, but sat a long time in silence. Yet Thetis, even as she had clasped his knees, so held to him, clinging close, and questioned him again a second time:Give me your infallible promise, and bow your head to it, or else deny me, for there is nothing to make you afraid; so that I may know well 1.511. /So she spoke; but Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, spoke no word to her, but sat a long time in silence. Yet Thetis, even as she had clasped his knees, so held to him, clinging close, and questioned him again a second time:Give me your infallible promise, and bow your head to it, or else deny me, for there is nothing to make you afraid; so that I may know well 1.512. /So she spoke; but Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, spoke no word to her, but sat a long time in silence. Yet Thetis, even as she had clasped his knees, so held to him, clinging close, and questioned him again a second time:Give me your infallible promise, and bow your head to it, or else deny me, for there is nothing to make you afraid; so that I may know well 1.513. /So she spoke; but Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, spoke no word to her, but sat a long time in silence. Yet Thetis, even as she had clasped his knees, so held to him, clinging close, and questioned him again a second time:Give me your infallible promise, and bow your head to it, or else deny me, for there is nothing to make you afraid; so that I may know well 1.514. /So she spoke; but Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, spoke no word to her, but sat a long time in silence. Yet Thetis, even as she had clasped his knees, so held to him, clinging close, and questioned him again a second time:Give me your infallible promise, and bow your head to it, or else deny me, for there is nothing to make you afraid; so that I may know well 1.515. /how far I among all the gods am honoured the least. Then, greatly troubled, Zeus, the cloud-gatherer spoke to her:Surely this will be sorry work, since you will set me on to engage in strife with Hera, when she shall anger me with taunting words. Even now she always upbraids me among the immortal gods 1.516. /how far I among all the gods am honoured the least. Then, greatly troubled, Zeus, the cloud-gatherer spoke to her:Surely this will be sorry work, since you will set me on to engage in strife with Hera, when she shall anger me with taunting words. Even now she always upbraids me among the immortal gods 1.517. /how far I among all the gods am honoured the least. Then, greatly troubled, Zeus, the cloud-gatherer spoke to her:Surely this will be sorry work, since you will set me on to engage in strife with Hera, when she shall anger me with taunting words. Even now she always upbraids me among the immortal gods 1.518. /how far I among all the gods am honoured the least. Then, greatly troubled, Zeus, the cloud-gatherer spoke to her:Surely this will be sorry work, since you will set me on to engage in strife with Hera, when she shall anger me with taunting words. Even now she always upbraids me among the immortal gods 1.519. /how far I among all the gods am honoured the least. Then, greatly troubled, Zeus, the cloud-gatherer spoke to her:Surely this will be sorry work, since you will set me on to engage in strife with Hera, when she shall anger me with taunting words. Even now she always upbraids me among the immortal gods 1.520. /and declares that I give aid to the Trojans in battle. But for the present, depart again, lest Hera note something; and I will take thought for these things to bring all to pass. Come, I will bow my head to you, that thou may be certain, for this from me is the surest token among the immortals; 1.521. /and declares that I give aid to the Trojans in battle. But for the present, depart again, lest Hera note something; and I will take thought for these things to bring all to pass. Come, I will bow my head to you, that thou may be certain, for this from me is the surest token among the immortals; 1.522. /and declares that I give aid to the Trojans in battle. But for the present, depart again, lest Hera note something; and I will take thought for these things to bring all to pass. Come, I will bow my head to you, that thou may be certain, for this from me is the surest token among the immortals; 1.523. /and declares that I give aid to the Trojans in battle. But for the present, depart again, lest Hera note something; and I will take thought for these things to bring all to pass. Come, I will bow my head to you, that thou may be certain, for this from me is the surest token among the immortals; 1.524. /and declares that I give aid to the Trojans in battle. But for the present, depart again, lest Hera note something; and I will take thought for these things to bring all to pass. Come, I will bow my head to you, that thou may be certain, for this from me is the surest token among the immortals; 1.525. /no word of mine may be recalled, nor is false, nor unfulfilled, to which I bow my head. The son of Cronos spoke, and bowed his dark brow in assent, and the ambrosial locks waved from the king's immortal head; and he made great Olympus quake. 1.526. /no word of mine may be recalled, nor is false, nor unfulfilled, to which I bow my head. The son of Cronos spoke, and bowed his dark brow in assent, and the ambrosial locks waved from the king's immortal head; and he made great Olympus quake. 1.527. /no word of mine may be recalled, nor is false, nor unfulfilled, to which I bow my head. The son of Cronos spoke, and bowed his dark brow in assent, and the ambrosial locks waved from the king's immortal head; and he made great Olympus quake. 1.528. /no word of mine may be recalled, nor is false, nor unfulfilled, to which I bow my head. The son of Cronos spoke, and bowed his dark brow in assent, and the ambrosial locks waved from the king's immortal head; and he made great Olympus quake. 1.529. /no word of mine may be recalled, nor is false, nor unfulfilled, to which I bow my head. The son of Cronos spoke, and bowed his dark brow in assent, and the ambrosial locks waved from the king's immortal head; and he made great Olympus quake. 1.530. / 2.323. /and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign 2.324. /and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign 2.325. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.326. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.327. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.328. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.329. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.350. /For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan 2.351. /For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan 2.352. /For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan 2.353. /For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan 4.164. /For even if for the moment the Olympian vouchsafeth not fulfillment, yet late and at length doth he fulfill them, and with a heavy price do men make atonement, even with their own heads and their wives and their children. For of a surety know I this in heart and soul: the day shall come when sacred Ilios shall be laid low 4.165. /and Priam, and the people of Priam, with goodly spear of ash; and Zeus, son of Cronos, throned on high, that dwelleth in the heaven, shall himself shake over them all his dark aegis in wrath for this deceit. These things verily shall not fail of fulfillment; yet dread grief for thee shall be mine, O Menelaus 4.168. /and Priam, and the people of Priam, with goodly spear of ash; and Zeus, son of Cronos, throned on high, that dwelleth in the heaven, shall himself shake over them all his dark aegis in wrath for this deceit. These things verily shall not fail of fulfillment; yet dread grief for thee shall be mine, O Menelaus 5.222. /go to face this man and make trial of him in arms. Nay, come, mount upon my car, that thou mayest see of what sort are the horses of Tros, well skilled to course fleetly hither and thither over the plain whether in pursuit or in flight. They twain will bring the two of us safely to the city 5.304. /eager to slay the man whosoever should come to seize the corpse, and crying a terrible cry. But the son of Tydeus grasped in his hand a stone—a mighty deed—one that not two men could bear, such as mortals now are; yet lightly did he wield it even alone. 9.413. /For my mother the goddess, silver-footed Thetis, telleth me that twofold fates are bearing me toward the doom of death: if I abide here and war about the city of the Trojans, then lost is my home-return, but my renown shall be imperishable; but if I return home to my dear native land 11.55. /to send forth to Hades many a valiant head.And the Trojans over against them on the rising ground of the plain mustered about great Hector and peerless Polydamas and Aeneas that was honoured of the folk of the Trojans even as a god, and the three sons of Antenor, Polybus and goodly Agenor 23.65. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.66. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.67. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.68. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.69. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.70. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.71. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.72. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.73. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.74. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.75. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.76. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.77. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.78. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.79. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.80. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.81. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.82. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.83. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.84. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.85. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.86. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.87. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.88. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.89. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.90. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.91. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.92. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.103. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.104. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.187. /nay, the daughter of Zeus, Aphrodite, kept dogs from him by day alike and by night, and with oil anointed she him, rose-sweet, ambrosial, to the end that Achilles might not tear him as he dragged him. And over him Phoebus Apollo drew a dark cloud from heaven to the plain, and covered all the place 24.21. /even in death, and with the golden aegis he covered him wholly, that Achilles might not tear his body as he dragged him. 24.51. /But this man, when he hath reft goodly Hector of life, bindeth him behind his chariot and draggeth him about the barrow of his dear comrade; in sooth neither honour nor profit shall he have therefrom. Let him beware lest we wax wroth with him, good man though he be; for lo, in his fury he doth foul despite unto senseless clay. 24.52. /But this man, when he hath reft goodly Hector of life, bindeth him behind his chariot and draggeth him about the barrow of his dear comrade; in sooth neither honour nor profit shall he have therefrom. Let him beware lest we wax wroth with him, good man though he be; for lo, in his fury he doth foul despite unto senseless clay. 24.53. /But this man, when he hath reft goodly Hector of life, bindeth him behind his chariot and draggeth him about the barrow of his dear comrade; in sooth neither honour nor profit shall he have therefrom. Let him beware lest we wax wroth with him, good man though he be; for lo, in his fury he doth foul despite unto senseless clay. 24.54. /But this man, when he hath reft goodly Hector of life, bindeth him behind his chariot and draggeth him about the barrow of his dear comrade; in sooth neither honour nor profit shall he have therefrom. Let him beware lest we wax wroth with him, good man though he be; for lo, in his fury he doth foul despite unto senseless clay. 24.416. /neither do worms consume it, such as devour men that be slain in fight. Truly Achilles draggeth him ruthlessly about the barrow of his dear comrade, so oft as sacred Dawn appeareth, howbeit he marreth him not; thou wouldst thyself marvel, wert thou to come and see how dewy-fresh he lieth, and is washen clean of blood 24.417. /neither do worms consume it, such as devour men that be slain in fight. Truly Achilles draggeth him ruthlessly about the barrow of his dear comrade, so oft as sacred Dawn appeareth, howbeit he marreth him not; thou wouldst thyself marvel, wert thou to come and see how dewy-fresh he lieth, and is washen clean of blood
3. Homer, Odyssey, 1.1-1.95, 9.12-9.18, 10.509-10.515, 11.21-11.22, 11.625-11.626, 24.1, 24.36-24.94 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Homeric Hymns, To Demeter, 335-385, 334 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

334. Shaking with fear, and, at the dawn’s first light
5. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 125, 124 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

124. κῆρυξ μέγιστε τῶν ἄνω τε καὶ κάτω 124. ἄρηξον, Ἑρμῆ χθόνιε, κηρύξας ἐμοὶ 124. Supreme herald of the realm above and the realm below, O Hermes of the nether world, come to my aid
6. Aeschylus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Aeschylus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Aeschylus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Aeschylus, Persians, 629-630, 628 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

628. ἀλλά, χθόνιοι δαίμονες ἁγνοί
10. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 348-349, 710-711, 322 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

322. Ἀίδᾳ προϊάψαι, δορὸς ἄγραν
11. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

111e. and some thicker, like the rivers of mud that flow before the lava in Sicily, and the lava itself. These fill the various regions as they happen to flow to one or another at any time. Now a kind of oscillation within the earth moves all these up and down. And the nature of the oscillation is as follows: Phaedo. One of the chasms of the earth is greater than the rest
12. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.1-1.8, 1.12-1.33, 1.227-1.228, 4.219-4.278, 6.749, 9.480-9.502, 10.1-10.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. Arms and the man I sing, who first made way 1.2. predestined exile, from the Trojan shore 1.3. to Italy, the blest Lavinian strand. 1.4. Smitten of storms he was on land and sea 1.5. by violence of Heaven, to satisfy 1.6. tern Juno's sleepless wrath; and much in war 1.7. he suffered, seeking at the last to found 1.8. the city, and bring o'er his fathers' gods 1.12. O Muse, the causes tell! What sacrilege 1.13. or vengeful sorrow, moved the heavenly Queen 1.14. to thrust on dangers dark and endless toil 1.15. a man whose largest honor in men's eyes 1.17. In ages gone an ancient city stood— 1.18. Carthage, a Tyrian seat, which from afar 1.19. made front on Italy and on the mouths 1.20. of Tiber 's stream; its wealth and revenues 1.21. were vast, and ruthless was its quest of war. 1.22. 'T is said that Juno, of all lands she loved 1.23. most cherished this,—not Samos ' self so dear. 1.24. Here were her arms, her chariot; even then 1.25. a throne of power o'er nations near and far 1.26. if Fate opposed not, 't was her darling hope 1.27. to 'stablish here; but anxiously she heard 1.28. that of the Trojan blood there was a breed 1.29. then rising, which upon the destined day 1.30. hould utterly o'erwhelm her Tyrian towers 1.31. a people of wide sway and conquest proud 1.32. hould compass Libya 's doom;—such was the web 1.33. the Fatal Sisters spun. Such was the fear 1.227. of unhewn stone, a place the wood-nymphs love. 1.228. In such a port, a weary ship rides free 4.219. and mass their dust-blown squadrons in wild flight 4.220. far from the mountain's bound. Ascanius 4.221. flushed with the sport, spurs on a mettled steed 4.222. from vale to vale, and many a flying herd 4.223. his chase outspeeds; but in his heart he prays 4.224. among these tame things suddenly to see 4.225. a tusky boar, or, leaping from the hills 4.227. Meanwhile low thunders in the distant sky 4.228. mutter confusedly; soon bursts in full 4.229. the storm-cloud and the hail. The Tyrian troop 4.230. is scattered wide; the chivalry of Troy 4.231. with the young heir of Dardan's kingly line 4.232. of Venus sprung, seek shelter where they may 4.233. with sudden terror; down the deep ravines 4.234. the swollen torrents roar. In that same hour 4.235. Queen Dido and her hero out of Troy 4.236. to the same cavern fly. Old Mother-Earth 4.237. and wedlock-keeping Juno gave the sign; 4.238. the flash of lightnings on the conscious air 4.239. were torches to the bridal; from the hills 4.240. the wailing wood-nymphs sobbed a wedding song. 4.241. Such was that day of death, the source and spring 4.242. of many a woe. For Dido took no heed 4.243. of honor and good-name; nor did she mean 4.244. her loves to hide; but called the lawlessness 4.246. Swift through the Libyan cities Rumor sped. 4.247. Rumor! What evil can surpass her speed? 4.248. In movement she grows mighty, and achieves 4.249. trength and dominion as she swifter flies. 4.250. mall first, because afraid, she soon exalts 4.251. her stature skyward, stalking through the lands 4.252. and mantling in the clouds her baleful brow. 4.253. The womb of Earth, in anger at high Heaven 4.254. bore her, they say, last of the Titan spawn 4.255. ister to Coeus and Enceladus. 4.256. Feet swift to run and pinions like the wind 4.257. the dreadful monster wears; her carcase huge 4.258. is feathered, and at root of every plume 4.259. a peering eye abides; and, strange to tell 4.260. an equal number of vociferous tongues 4.261. foul, whispering lips, and ears, that catch at all. 4.262. At night she spreads midway 'twixt earth and heaven 4.263. her pinions in the darkness, hissing loud 4.264. nor e'er to happy slumber gives her eyes: 4.265. but with the morn she takes her watchful throne 4.266. high on the housetops or on lofty towers 4.267. to terrify the nations. She can cling 4.268. to vile invention and maligt wrong 4.269. or mingle with her word some tidings true. 4.270. She now with changeful story filled men's ears 4.271. exultant, whether false or true she sung: 4.272. how, Trojan-born Aeneas having come 4.273. Dido, the lovely widow, Iooked his way 4.274. deigning to wed; how all the winter long 4.275. they passed in revel and voluptuous ease 4.276. to dalliance given o'er; naught heeding now 4.277. of crown or kingdom—shameless! lust-enslaved! 4.278. Such tidings broadcast on the lips of men 6.749. Here Earth's first offspring, the Titanic brood 9.480. clean through his bare breast as he started forth 9.481. the youth thrust home his sword, then drew it back 9.482. death-dripping, while the bursting purple stream 9.483. of life outflowed, with mingling blood and wine. 9.484. Then, flushed with stealthy slaughter, he crept near 9.485. the followers of Messapus, where he saw 9.486. their camp-fire dying down, and tethered steeds 9.487. upon the meadow feeding. Nisus then 9.488. knew the hot lust of slaughter had swept on 9.489. too far, and cried, “Hold off! For, lo 9.490. the monitory dawn is nigh. Revenge 9.491. has fed us to the full. We have achieved 9.492. clean passage through the foe.” Full many a prize 9.493. was left untaken: princely suits of mail 9.494. enwrought with silver pure, huge drinking-bowls 9.495. and broideries fair. Yet grasped Euryalus 9.496. the blazonry at Rhamnes' corselet hung 9.497. and belt adorned with gold: which were a gift 9.498. to Remulus of Tibur from the store 9.499. of opulent Caedicus, who sued from far 9.500. to be a friend; and these in death he gave 9.501. to his son's son, who slain in battle fell 9.502. and proud Rutulians seized them with the spoil. 10.1. Meanwhile Olympus, seat of sovereign sway 10.2. threw wide its portals, and in conclave fair
13. Lucan, Pharsalia, 1.1-1.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. New Testament, John, 1.3-1.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.3. All things were made through him. Without him was not anything made that has been made. 1.4. In him was life, and the life was the light of men.
15. Statius, Thebais, 3.129 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16. John Chrysostom, Homilies On John, 5 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

17. Anon., Scholia In Homeri Odysseam, 11.602



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achaean wall Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
achilles, mênis of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 37
achilles, wrath of achilles Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
achilles Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 44; Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 21, 22; Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 30; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 37
achilleus Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 13
aemulatio Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 202, 207
aeneas Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
aeneas and odysseus, odyssey and iliad Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 202
aeschylus Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 163
agamemnon Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 21, 22; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 37
anchoring allusions Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 44
antiphony Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 44
apollo Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 46; Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175; Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 21
aristarchus of samothrace Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
arms (arma) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 45, 46
athetesis Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 211
attacks Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 163
attempted abuse of hector Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 30
audience Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 163
autos Gee, Mapping the Afterlife: From Homer to Dante (2020) 19, 20
blindness Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 163
bremmer, jan n. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 398
briseis Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 21
chryseis Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 21
chryses Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 21
concord Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 207
consciousness Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 13
corpse Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 38
correction Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 207
councils Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 207
cypria Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
death Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 45
death and the afterlife, communication with souls of the dead Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 398
death and the afterlife, conceptions of death Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 398
death and the afterlife, corpse (soma) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 398
death and the afterlife, hades (underworld) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 398
death and the afterlife, soul (psyche)' Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 398
dialogue de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 37
dido Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
dogs Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151
dreams Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 163
edmonds iii, radcliffe g. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 398
education, instruction Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 46
edwards, m.w. Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
eidolon/εἴδωλον Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 38
elegy, erotic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151
elysium, elysian field Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
emotion Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 13
emotional restraint, narratology of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 37
emotions, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 46
emotions, anger/rage de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 37
emotions Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 46
epic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 45, 46; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151
epic cycle Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
epicureanism Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 126
eteocles Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 163
ethical qualities, anger, wrath (ira, mênis) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 46
euryalus, mother of Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151
euryalus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151
eusebius of caesareas gospel problems and aristarchus on homer, athetesis Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 211
eusebius of caesareas gospel problems and aristarchus on homer, contemporary linguistic usage, reference to Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 212
eusebius of caesareas gospel problems and aristarchus on homer, punctuation, changing Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 211, 212
eusebius of caesareas gospel problems and aristarchus on homer, strategies of aristarchus followed and expanded by eusebius Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 211, 212
eusebius of caesareas gospel problems and aristarchus on homer Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 211, 212
fate (moira) de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 37
genesis, book of Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 22
ghost Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 38
gilgamesh Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 22
gods Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 45, 46
goos Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 44
hades Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 38; Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 163
hainsworth, j.b. Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
harrison, thomas Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 398
hayes, christine Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 5
hazony, yoram Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 5
hektor Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 21
helen Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 22
hera Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 21
herakles/heracles/hercules Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
herdsman, as psychopomp Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
herdsman, in homer Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
hermes, chthonios Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
hero, heroism, race of heroes Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
hero Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 45, 46
heroic age, catalogue of women Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
heroic age, hesiod and hesiodic corpus Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
heroic age, works and days Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
hexameters Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151
homer, conventions of Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 44
homer, iliad Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 398; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151
homer, lucans use of Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 44
homer, model / anti-model for lucan Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 44
homer, odyssey Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 398
homer, portrayal of the gods Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 21
homer, praise in Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 44
homer Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 163; Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 13
homeric scholia Gee, Mapping the Afterlife: From Homer to Dante (2020) 19
honour, dishonouring de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 37
honour, kleos aphthiton (κλέος ἄφθιτον) de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 37
horace Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151
hutchinson, gregory o. Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 163
iliad Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 21, 22
interpretation Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 163
intertextuality, imitation Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 45
intertextuality, metrical Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 45, 46
intertextuality de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 37
isles of the blessed Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
jaeger, w. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 398
juno Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 202; Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 46
kalchas Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 21, 22
kirk, j.s. Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
knowledge Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 163
lament Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151
law, divine Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 5
looking through, aeneid through odyssey to iliad Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 202, 207
memory Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 13
menelaus Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
mercury/hermes, in vergil Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
miller, f. d. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 398
narrator Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 44
nenia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151
nestor Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 21
nisus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151
odysseus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 126; Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 44
odysseus (mythological hero) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 398
oedipus Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 163
origen, punctuation, changing Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 212
otto, walter f. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 398
palinurus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151
patroclus Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 30
paul Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 5
persephone Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
philosophy, and hebrew bible Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 5
plato Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 398; Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 13
populus romanus, as central character in the pharsalia Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 44
poseidon Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 46; Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
prologues Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 202
psuchē Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 13
psukhē/ai Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 38
punctuation of texts, suggesting changes in Ayres and Ward, The Rise of the Early Christian Intellectual (2021) 211, 212
querimonia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151
roma, as a character Joseph, Thunder and Lament: Lucan on the Beginnings and Ends of Epic (2022) 44
rutulians Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151
sarpedon Mcclellan, Paulinus Noster: Self and Symbols in the Letters of Paulinus of Nola (2019) 30
schein, s. Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
scodel, r. Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
self, the Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 13
shadow Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 38
slatkin, l. Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
snell, b. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 398
soul, the, space, concepts of Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 13
statius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151
temporality de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 37
tertullian Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 5
thetis Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 21, 22
threnos (and threnody) Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151
thumos Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 13
time/temporality Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 163
time de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 37
tradition, classical-biblical Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 5
trojan cycle Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 163
trojan war Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175; Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 163
troy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 45; Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175; Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 21, 22
underworld Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151
verbs, tenses of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 37
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, iliadic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 45
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, odyssean Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 45
vergil, aeneid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 151; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
vergil Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 182
war, warfare Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 46
will, the Seaford, Wilkins, Wright, Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill (2017) 13
words Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 45, 46
zeus, dios boulē Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175
zeus, will of Legaspi, Wisdom in Classical and Biblical Tradition (2018) 21, 22
zeus Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 175; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 37