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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6581
Hippocrates, The Sacred Disease, 1.10
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

23 results
1. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 900 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

900. θέλξειν μʼ ἔοικας καὶ μεθίσταμαι κότου. Ἀθηνᾶ 900. It seems you will win me by your spells; I am letting go my anger. Athena
2. Aristophanes, Clouds, 749-755, 102 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

102. αἰβοῖ πονηροί γ', οἶδα. τοὺς ἀλαζόνας
3. Euripides, Bacchae, 944 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

944. αἴρειν νιν· αἰνῶ δʼ ὅτι μεθέστηκας φρενῶν. Πενθεύς
4. Herodotus, Histories, 1.107, 1.120, 1.128, 1.132, 1.140, 7.19, 7.37, 7.43, 7.113, 7.191 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.107. Afterwards, Cyaxares died after a reign of forty years (among which I count the years of the Scythian domination) and his son Astyages inherited the sovereignty. Astyages had a daughter, whom he called Mandane: he dreamed that she urinated so much that she filled his city and flooded all of Asia . He communicated this vision to those of the Magi who interpreted dreams, and when he heard what they told him he was terrified; ,and presently, when Mandane was of marriageable age, he feared the vision too much to give her to any Mede worthy to marry into his family, but married her to a Persian called Cambyses, a man whom he knew to be wellborn and of a quiet temper: for Astyages held Cambyses to be much lower than a Mede of middle rank. 1.120. Thus Astyages punished Harpagus. But, to help him to decide about Cyrus, he summoned the same Magi who had interpreted his dream as I have said: and when they came, Astyages asked them how they had interpreted his dream. They answered as before, and said that the boy must have been made king had he lived and not died first. ,Then Astyages said, “The boy is safe and alive, and when he was living in the country the boys of his village made him king, and he duly did all that is done by true kings: for he assigned to each individually the roles of bodyguards and sentinels and messengers and everything else, and so ruled. And what do you think is the significance of this?” ,“If the boy is alive,” said the Magi, “and has been made king without premeditation, then be confident on this score and keep an untroubled heart: he will not be made king a second time. Even in our prophecies, it is often but a small thing that has been foretold and the consequences of dreams come to nothing in the end.” ,“I too, Magi,” said Astyages, “am very much of your opinion: that the dream came true when the boy was called king, and that I have no more to fear from him. Nevertheless consider well and advise me what will be safest both for my house and for you.” ,The Magi said, “O King, we too are very anxious that your sovereignty prosper: for otherwise, it passes from your nation to this boy who is a Persian, and so we Medes are enslaved and held of no account by the Persians, as we are of another blood, but while you, our countryman, are established king, we have our share of power, and great honor is shown us by you. ,Thus, then, we ought by all means to watch out for you and for your sovereignty. And if at the present time we saw any danger we would declare everything to you: but now the dream has had a trifling conclusion, and we ourselves are confident and advise you to be so also. As for this boy, send him out of your sight to the Persians and to his parents.” 1.128. Thus the Median army was shamefully scattered. As soon as Astyages heard, he sent a threatening message to Cyrus: “Nevertheless, Cyrus shall not rejoice”; ,and with that he took the Magi who interpreted dreams, who had persuaded him to let Cyrus go free, and impaled them; then he armed the Medes who were left in the city, the very young and very old men. ,Leading these out, and engaging the Persians, he was beaten: Astyages himself was taken prisoner, and lost the Median army which he led. 1.132. And this is their method of sacrifice to the aforesaid gods: when about to sacrifice, they do not build altars or kindle fire, employ libations, or music, or fillets, or barley meal: when a man wishes to sacrifice to one of the gods, he leads a beast to an open space and then, wearing a wreath on his tiara, of myrtle usually, calls on the god. ,To pray for blessings for himself alone is not lawful for the sacrificer; rather, he prays that the king and all the Persians be well; for he reckons himself among them. He then cuts the victim limb from limb into portions, and, after boiling the flesh, spreads the softest grass, trefoil usually, and places all of it on this. ,When he has so arranged it, a Magus comes near and chants over it the song of the birth of the gods, as the Persian tradition relates it; for no sacrifice can be offered without a Magus. Then after a little while the sacrificer carries away the flesh and uses it as he pleases. 1.140. So much I can say of them from my own certain knowledge. But there are other matters concerning the dead which are secretly and obscurely told: how the dead bodies of Persians are not buried before they have been mangled by birds or dogs. ,That this is the way of the Magi, I know for certain; for they do not conceal the practice. But this is certain, that before the Persians bury the body in earth they embalm it in wax. These Magi are as unlike the priests of Egypt as they are unlike all other men: ,for the priests consider it sacrilege to kill anything that lives, except what they sacrifice; but the Magi kill with their own hands every creature, except dogs and men; they kill all alike, ants and snakes, creeping and flying things, and take great pride in it. Leaving this custom to be such as it has been from the first, I return now to my former story. 7.19. Xerxes was now intent on the expedition and then saw a third vision in his sleep, which the Magi interpreted to refer to the whole earth and to signify that all men should be his slaves. This was the vision: Xerxes thought that he was crowned with an olive bough, of which the shoots spread over the whole earth, and then the crown vanished from off his head where it was set. ,The Magi interpreted it in this way, and immediately every single man of the Persians who had been assembled rode away to his own province and there used all zeal to fulfill the kings command, each desiring to receive the promised gifts. Thus it was that Xerxes mustered his army, searching out every part of the continent. 7.37. When the bridges and the work at Athos were ready, and both the dikes at the canal's entrances, built to prevent the surf from silting up the entrances of the dug passage, and the canal itself were reported to be now completely finished, the army then wintered. At the beginning of spring the army made ready and set forth from Sardis to march to Abydos. ,As it was setting out, the sun left his place in the heaven and was invisible, although the sky was without clouds and very clear, and the day turned into night. When Xerxes saw and took note of that, he was concerned and asked the Magi what the vision might signify. ,They declared to him that the god was showing the Greeks the abandonment of their cities; for the sun (they said) was the prophet of the Greeks, as the moon was their own. Xerxes rejoiced exceedingly to hear that and continued on his march. 7.43. When the army had come to the river Scamander, which was the first river after the beginning of their march from Sardis that fell short of their needs and was not sufficient for the army and the cattle to drink—arriving at this river, Xerxes ascended to the citadel of Priam, having a desire to see it. ,After he saw it and asked about everything there, he sacrificed a thousand cattle to Athena of Ilium, and the Magi offered libations to the heroes. After they did this, a panic fell upon the camp in the night. When it was day they journeyed on from there, keeping on their left the cities of Rhoetium and Ophryneum and Dardanus, which borders Abydos, and on their right the Teucrian Gergithae. 7.113. Marching past the Paeonians, Doberes, and Paeoplae, who dwell beyond and northward of the Pangaean mountains, he kept going westwards, until he came to the river Strymon and the city of Eion; its governor was that Boges, then still alive, whom I mentioned just before this. ,All this region about the Pangaean range is called Phyllis; it stretches westwards to the river Angites, which issues into the Strymon, and southwards to the Strymon itself; at this river the Magi sought good omens by sacrificing white horses. 7.191. There was no counting how many grain-ships and other vessels were destroyed. The generals of the fleet were afraid that the Thessalians might attack them now that they had been defeated, so they built a high palisade out of the wreckage. ,The storm lasted three days. Finally the Magi made offerings and cast spells upon the wind, sacrificing also to Thetis and the Nereids. In this way they made the wind stop on the fourth day—or perhaps it died down on its own. They sacrificed to Thetis after hearing from the Ionians the story that it was from this place that Peleus had carried her off and that all the headland of Sepia belonged to her and to the other Nereids.
5. Hippocrates, The Sacred Disease, 18.6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Plato, Charmides, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

173c. our shoes, nay, everything about us, and various things besides, because we should be employing genuine craftsmen? And if you liked, we might concede that prophecy, as the knowledge of what is to be, and temperance directing her, will deter the charlatans, and establish the true prophets as our prognosticators. Thus equipped, the human race would indeed act and live
7. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

909b. or open to bribes, despise men, charming the souls of many of the living, and claiming that they charm the souls of the dead, and promising to persuade the gods by bewitching them, as it were, with sacrifices, prayers and incantations, and who try thus to wreck utterly not only individuals, but whole families and States for the sake of money,—if any of these men be pronounced guilty, the court shall order him to be imprisoned according to law in the mid-country jail
8. Plato, Meno, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

81a. Men. Now does it seem to you to be a good argument, Socrates? Soc. It does not. Men. Can you explain how not? Soc. I can; for I have heard from wise men and women who told of things divine that— Men. What was it they said ? Soc. Something true, as I thought, and admirable. Men. What was it? And who were the speakers? Soc. They were certain priests and priestesses who have studied so as to be able to give a reasoned account of their ministry; and Pindar also
9. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

242b. no one of all those who have been born in your lifetime has produced more discourses than you, either by speaking them yourself or compelling others to do so. I except Simmias the Theban; but you are far ahead of all the rest. And now I think you have become the cause of another, spoken by me. Phaedrus. That is not exactly a declaration of war! But how is this, and what is the discourse? Socrates. My good friend, when I was about to cross the stream, the spirit and the sign
10. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 387 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Aeschines, Letters, 3.137 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

13. Theophrastus, Characters, 16.11 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

14. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 11.92 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Plutarch, On The Obsolescence of Oracles, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

417c. in which it is possible to gain the clearest reflections and adumbrations of the truth about the demigods, 'let my lips be piously sealed,' as Herodotus says; but as for festivals and sacrifices, which may be compared with ill-omened and gloomy days, in which occur the eating of raw flesh, rending of victims, fasting, and beating of breasts, and again in many places scurrilous language at the shrines, and Frenzy and shouting of throngs in excitement With tumultuous tossing of heads in the air, Ishould say that these acts are not performed for any god, but are soothing and appeasing rites for the averting of evil spirits. Nor is it credible that the gods demanded or welcomed the human sacrifices of ancient days
16. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 2.13 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

17. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 2.37 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.37. 37.The first God being incorporeal, immoveable, and impartible, and neither subsisting in any thing, nor restrained in his energies, is not, as has been before observed, in want of any thing external to himself, as neither is the soul of the world; but this latter, containing in itself the principle of that which is triply divisible, and being naturally self-motive, is adapted to be moved in a beautiful and orderly manner, and also to move the body of the world, according to the most excellent reasons [i.e. productive principles or powers]. It is, however, connected with and comprehends body, though it is itself incorporeal, and liberated from the participation of any passion. To the remaining Gods, therefore, to the world, to the inerratic and erratic stars, who are visible Gods, consisting of soul and body, thanks are to be returned after the above-mentioned manner, through sacrifices from iimate natures. The multitude, therefore, of those invisible beings remains for us, whom Plato indiscriminately calls daemons 17; but of these, some being denominated by men, obtain from them honours, and other religious observances, similar to those which are paid to the Gods; but others, who for the most part are not explicitly denominated, receive an occult religious reverence and appellation from certain persons in villages and certain cities; and the remaining multitude is called in common by the |67 name of daemons. The general persuasion, however, respecting all these invisible beings, is this, that if they become angry through being neglected, and deprived of the religious reverence which is due to them, they are noxious to those by whom they are thus neglected, and that they again become beneficent, if they are appeased by prayers, supplications, and sacrifices, and other similar rites. SPAN
18. Aeschines, Or., 3.137

19. Epigraphy, Lsam, 84

20. Epigraphy, Smyrna, 728

21. Heraclitus Lesbius, Fragments, 17, 5, 14

22. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 646, 648, 650-651, 582

23. Papyri, Derveni Papyrus, 20.2-20.3



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
allegoresis (allegorical interpretation), in the derveni papyrus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
antisthenes Harte, Rereading Ancient Philosophy: Old Chestnuts and Sacred Cows (2017) 111
aristophanes Harte, Rereading Ancient Philosophy: Old Chestnuts and Sacred Cows (2017) 111
aristotle Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
asia minor deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 47
authority, competition for authority Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
cakes (offerings) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
clients, of priests Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
creon Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 237
daimons Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
demeter deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 47
derveni author Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35, 131
dionysus deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 47
empedocles Harte, Rereading Ancient Philosophy: Old Chestnuts and Sacred Cows (2017) 111
erinyes Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
eros (personified) Harte, Rereading Ancient Philosophy: Old Chestnuts and Sacred Cows (2017) 111
eschatology Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
eumenides Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
expiation Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
hippocratic authors Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35, 131
initiates, hope of the initiates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
initiates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35, 131
initiations, fees for Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
iranian priests Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
knowledge, acquired in the initiation Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
libations Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
magic, and magicians Harte, Rereading Ancient Philosophy: Old Chestnuts and Sacred Cows (2017) 111
magic, greek terms for Harte, Rereading Ancient Philosophy: Old Chestnuts and Sacred Cows (2017) 111
magic Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35, 131; Harte, Rereading Ancient Philosophy: Old Chestnuts and Sacred Cows (2017) 111
magic birth of term Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 237
magoi Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 237
medicine Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
mystery cults, in the cities Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
oedipus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 237
officiants (in the mysteries) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
orphic doctrines Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
orphic priests Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
pity Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
plato Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35, 131
priestesses Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
priests, begging' Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 237
priests Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
private initiators Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
professionals, of the sacred Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35, 131
punishments Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
purification Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
pythagoras / (neo-)pythagoreanism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 47
rhapsodies deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 47
rites, rituals Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35, 131
rites deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 47
ritual taboo deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 47
sacrifices Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
salvation Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
servants of the gods (minor deities) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
souls Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
teiresias Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 237
theogonies deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 47
titans deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 47
truth Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 131
underworld Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
zeus deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 47
μάγοι Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35, 131