Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6471
Hesiod, Works And Days, 72-74


ζῶσε δὲ καὶ κόσμησε θεὰ γλαυκῶπις Ἀθήνη·The golden Aphrodite would let flow


ἀμφὶ δέ οἱ Χάριτές τε θεαὶ καὶ πότνια ΠειθὼWith painful passions and bone-shattering stress.


ὅρμους χρυσείους ἔθεσαν χροΐ· ἀμφὶ δὲ τήν γεThen Argus-slayer Hermes had to add


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

34 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 6.17, 19.17 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

6.17. וַאֲנִי הִנְנִי מֵבִיא אֶת־הַמַּבּוּל מַיִם עַל־הָאָרֶץ לְשַׁחֵת כָּל־בָּשָׂר אֲשֶׁר־בּוֹ רוּחַ חַיִּים מִתַּחַת הַשָּׁמָיִם כֹּל אֲשֶׁר־בָּאָרֶץ יִגְוָע׃ 19.17. וַיְהִי כְהוֹצִיאָם אֹתָם הַחוּצָה וַיֹּאמֶר הִמָּלֵט עַל־נַפְשֶׁךָ אַל־תַּבִּיט אַחֲרֶיךָ וְאַל־תַּעֲמֹד בְּכָל־הַכִּכָּר הָהָרָה הִמָּלֵט פֶּן־תִּסָּפֶה׃ 6.17. And I, behold, I do bring the flood of waters upon the earth, to destroy all flesh, wherein is the breath of life, from under heaven; every thing that is in the earth shall perish." 19.17. And it came to pass, when they had brought them forth abroad, that he said: ‘Escape for thy life; look not behind thee, neither stay thou in all the Plain; escape to the mountain, lest thou be swept away.’"
2. Hebrew Bible, 1 Samuel, 19.11 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

19.11. וַיִּשְׁלַח שָׁאוּל מַלְאָכִים אֶל־בֵּית דָּוִד לְשָׁמְרוֹ וְלַהֲמִיתוֹ בַּבֹּקֶר וַתַּגֵּד לְדָוִד מִיכַל אִשְׁתּוֹ לֵאמֹר אִם־אֵינְךָ מְמַלֵּט אֶת־נַפְשְׁךָ הַלַּיְלָה מָחָר אַתָּה מוּמָת׃ 19.11. And Sha᾽ul sent messengers to David’s house, to watch him, and to slay him in the morning: and Mikhal David’s wife told him, saying, If thou save not thy life tonight, to morrow thou shalt be slain."
3. Hebrew Bible, 2 Samuel, 14.25, 15.1 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14.25. וּכְאַבְשָׁלוֹם לֹא־הָיָה אִישׁ־יָפֶה בְּכָל־יִשְׂרָאֵל לְהַלֵּל מְאֹד מִכַּף רַגְלוֹ וְעַד קָדְקֳדוֹ לֹא־הָיָה בוֹ מוּם׃ 15.1. וַיְהִי מֵאַחֲרֵי כֵן וַיַּעַשׂ לוֹ אַבְשָׁלוֹם מֶרְכָּבָה וְסֻסִים וַחֲמִשִּׁים אִישׁ רָצִים לְפָנָיו׃ 15.1. וַיִּשְׁלַח אַבְשָׁלוֹם מְרַגְּלִים בְּכָל־שִׁבְטֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל לֵאמֹר כְּשָׁמְעֲכֶם אֶת־קוֹל הַשֹּׁפָר וַאֲמַרְתֶּם מָלַךְ אַבְשָׁלוֹם בְּחֶבְרוֹן׃ 14.25. But in all Yisra᾽el there was none so much praised as Avshalom for his beauty: from the sole of his foot to the crown of his head there was no blemish in him." 15.1. And it came to pass after this, that Avshalom prepared him chariots and horses, and fifty men to run before him."
4. Hebrew Bible, Amos, 2.14-2.15 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

2.14. וְאָבַד מָנוֹס מִקָּל וְחָזָק לֹא־יְאַמֵּץ כֹּחוֹ וְגִבּוֹר לֹא־יְמַלֵּט נַפְשׁוֹ׃ 2.15. וְתֹפֵשׂ הַקֶּשֶׁת לֹא יַעֲמֹד וְקַל בְּרַגְלָיו לֹא יְמַלֵּט וְרֹכֵב הַסּוּס לֹא יְמַלֵּט נַפְשׁוֹ׃ 2.14. And flight shall fail the swift, And the strong shall not exert his strength, Neither shall the mighty deliver himself;" 2.15. Neither shall he stand that handleth the bow; And he that is swift of foot shall not deliver himself; Neither shall he that rideth the horse deliver himself;"
5. Hesiod, Works And Days, 100-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-139, 14, 140-149, 15, 150-159, 16, 160-169, 17, 170-179, 18, 180-189, 19, 190-199, 20, 200-209, 21, 210-219, 22, 220-229, 23, 230-239, 24, 240-249, 25, 250-259, 26, 260-269, 27, 270-279, 28, 280-289, 29, 290-292, 30-37, 376, 38-48, 483-484, 49-70, 702-703, 71, 73-75, 755-757, 76-99, 10 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

10. For, Perses, I would tell the truth to you.
6. Hesiod, Theogony, 155-210, 233-236, 26, 262, 27, 270-279, 28, 280-336, 453-735, 820-880, 937, 154 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

154. The wily Cronus, such a dreadful son
7. Homer, Iliad, 3.65-3.66, 3.156-3.160, 3.290-3.294, 4.59, 5.5, 5.7, 5.184-5.187, 9.390, 14.211-14.213, 14.246, 14.276-14.291, 18.417-18.420 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3.65. /Not to be flung aside, look you, are the glorious gifts of the gods, even all that of themselves they give, whereas by his own will could no man win them. But now, if thou wilt have me war and do battle, make the other Trojans to sit down and all the Achaeans, but set ye me in the midst and Menelaus, dear to Ares 3.66. /Not to be flung aside, look you, are the glorious gifts of the gods, even all that of themselves they give, whereas by his own will could no man win them. But now, if thou wilt have me war and do battle, make the other Trojans to sit down and all the Achaeans, but set ye me in the midst and Menelaus, dear to Ares 3.156. /softly they spake winged words one to another:Small blame that Trojans and well-greaved Achaeans should for such a woman long time suffer woes; wondrously like is she to the immortal goddesses to look upon. But even so, for all that she is such an one, let her depart upon the ships 3.157. /softly they spake winged words one to another:Small blame that Trojans and well-greaved Achaeans should for such a woman long time suffer woes; wondrously like is she to the immortal goddesses to look upon. But even so, for all that she is such an one, let her depart upon the ships 3.158. /softly they spake winged words one to another:Small blame that Trojans and well-greaved Achaeans should for such a woman long time suffer woes; wondrously like is she to the immortal goddesses to look upon. But even so, for all that she is such an one, let her depart upon the ships 3.159. /softly they spake winged words one to another:Small blame that Trojans and well-greaved Achaeans should for such a woman long time suffer woes; wondrously like is she to the immortal goddesses to look upon. But even so, for all that she is such an one, let her depart upon the ships 3.160. /neither be left here to be a bane to us and to our children after us. So they said, but Priam spake, and called Helen to him:Come hither, dear child, and sit before me, that thou mayest see thy former lord and thy kinsfolk and thy people—thou art nowise to blame in my eyes; it is the gods, methinks, that are to blame 3.290. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.291. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.292. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.293. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.294. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 4.59. /For even though I grudge thee, and am fain to thwart their overthrow, I avail naught by my grudging, for truly thou art far the mightier. Still it beseemeth that my labour too be not made of none effect; for I also am a god, and my birth is from the stock whence is thine own, and crooked-counselling Cronos begat me as the most honoured of his daughters 5.5. /And now to Tydeus' son, Diomedes, Pallas Athene gave might and courage, that he should prove himself pre-eminent amid all the Argives, and win glorious renown. She kindled from his helm and shield flame unwearying 5.5. /like to the star of harvesttime that shineth bright above all others when he hath bathed him in the stream of Ocean. Even such flame did she kindle from his head and shoulders; and she sent him into the midst where men thronged the thickest.Now there was amid the Trojans one Dares, a rich man and blameless 5.7. /like to the star of harvesttime that shineth bright above all others when he hath bathed him in the stream of Ocean. Even such flame did she kindle from his head and shoulders; and she sent him into the midst where men thronged the thickest.Now there was amid the Trojans one Dares, a rich man and blameless 5.184. / Aeneas, counsellor of the brazen-coated Trojans, to the wise-hearted son of Tydeus do I liken him in all things, knowing him by his shield and his crested helm, and when I look on his horses; yet I know not surely if he be not a god. But if he be the man I deem him, even the wise-hearted son of Tydeus 5.185. /not without the aid of some god doth he thus rage, but one of the immortals standeth hard by him, his shoulders wrapped in cloud, and turned aside from him my swift shaft even as it lighted. For already have I let fly a shaft at him, and I smote him upon the right shoulder clean through the plate of his corselet; 5.186. /not without the aid of some god doth he thus rage, but one of the immortals standeth hard by him, his shoulders wrapped in cloud, and turned aside from him my swift shaft even as it lighted. For already have I let fly a shaft at him, and I smote him upon the right shoulder clean through the plate of his corselet; 5.187. /not without the aid of some god doth he thus rage, but one of the immortals standeth hard by him, his shoulders wrapped in cloud, and turned aside from him my swift shaft even as it lighted. For already have I let fly a shaft at him, and I smote him upon the right shoulder clean through the plate of his corselet; 9.390. /and in handiwork were the peer of flashing-eyed Athene: not even so will I wed her; let him choose another of the Achaeans that is of like station with himself and more kingly than I. For if the gods preserve me, and I reach my home, Peleus methinks will thereafter of himself seek me a wife. 14.211. /ever should I be called dear by them and worthy of reverence. To her again spake in answer laughter-loving Aphrodite:It may not be that I should say thee nay, nor were it seemly; for thou sleepest in the arms of mightiest Zeus. She spake, and loosed from her bosom the broidered zone 14.212. /ever should I be called dear by them and worthy of reverence. To her again spake in answer laughter-loving Aphrodite:It may not be that I should say thee nay, nor were it seemly; for thou sleepest in the arms of mightiest Zeus. She spake, and loosed from her bosom the broidered zone 14.213. /ever should I be called dear by them and worthy of reverence. To her again spake in answer laughter-loving Aphrodite:It may not be that I should say thee nay, nor were it seemly; for thou sleepest in the arms of mightiest Zeus. She spake, and loosed from her bosom the broidered zone 14.246. /Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson 14.276. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.277. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.278. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.279. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.280. /But when she had sworn and made an end of the oath, the twain left the cities of Lemnos and Imbros, and clothed about in mist went forth, speeding swiftly on their way. To many-fountained Ida they came, the mother of wild creatures, even to Lectum, where first they left the sea; and the twain fared on over the dry land 14.281. /But when she had sworn and made an end of the oath, the twain left the cities of Lemnos and Imbros, and clothed about in mist went forth, speeding swiftly on their way. To many-fountained Ida they came, the mother of wild creatures, even to Lectum, where first they left the sea; and the twain fared on over the dry land 14.282. /But when she had sworn and made an end of the oath, the twain left the cities of Lemnos and Imbros, and clothed about in mist went forth, speeding swiftly on their way. To many-fountained Ida they came, the mother of wild creatures, even to Lectum, where first they left the sea; and the twain fared on over the dry land 14.283. /But when she had sworn and made an end of the oath, the twain left the cities of Lemnos and Imbros, and clothed about in mist went forth, speeding swiftly on their way. To many-fountained Ida they came, the mother of wild creatures, even to Lectum, where first they left the sea; and the twain fared on over the dry land 14.284. /But when she had sworn and made an end of the oath, the twain left the cities of Lemnos and Imbros, and clothed about in mist went forth, speeding swiftly on their way. To many-fountained Ida they came, the mother of wild creatures, even to Lectum, where first they left the sea; and the twain fared on over the dry land 14.285. /and the topmost forest quivered beneath their feet. There Sleep did halt, or ever the eyes of Zeus beheld him, and mounted up on a fir-tree exceeding tall, the highest that then grew in Ida; and it reached up through the mists into heaven. Thereon he perched, thick-hidden by the branches of the fir 14.286. /and the topmost forest quivered beneath their feet. There Sleep did halt, or ever the eyes of Zeus beheld him, and mounted up on a fir-tree exceeding tall, the highest that then grew in Ida; and it reached up through the mists into heaven. Thereon he perched, thick-hidden by the branches of the fir 14.287. /and the topmost forest quivered beneath their feet. There Sleep did halt, or ever the eyes of Zeus beheld him, and mounted up on a fir-tree exceeding tall, the highest that then grew in Ida; and it reached up through the mists into heaven. Thereon he perched, thick-hidden by the branches of the fir 14.288. /and the topmost forest quivered beneath their feet. There Sleep did halt, or ever the eyes of Zeus beheld him, and mounted up on a fir-tree exceeding tall, the highest that then grew in Ida; and it reached up through the mists into heaven. Thereon he perched, thick-hidden by the branches of the fir 14.289. /and the topmost forest quivered beneath their feet. There Sleep did halt, or ever the eyes of Zeus beheld him, and mounted up on a fir-tree exceeding tall, the highest that then grew in Ida; and it reached up through the mists into heaven. Thereon he perched, thick-hidden by the branches of the fir 14.290. /in the likeness of a clear-voiced mountain bird, that the gods call Chalcis, and men Cymindis.But Hera swiftly drew nigh to topmost Gargarus, the peak of lofty Ida, and Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, beheld her. And when he beheld her, then love encompassed his wise heart about 14.291. /in the likeness of a clear-voiced mountain bird, that the gods call Chalcis, and men Cymindis.But Hera swiftly drew nigh to topmost Gargarus, the peak of lofty Ida, and Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, beheld her. And when he beheld her, then love encompassed his wise heart about 18.417. /and his mighty neck and shaggy breast, and put upon him a tunic, and grasped a stout staff, and went forth halting; but there moved swiftly to support their lord handmaidens wrought of gold in the semblance of living maids. In them is understanding in their hearts, and in them speech 18.418. /and his mighty neck and shaggy breast, and put upon him a tunic, and grasped a stout staff, and went forth halting; but there moved swiftly to support their lord handmaidens wrought of gold in the semblance of living maids. In them is understanding in their hearts, and in them speech 18.419. /and his mighty neck and shaggy breast, and put upon him a tunic, and grasped a stout staff, and went forth halting; but there moved swiftly to support their lord handmaidens wrought of gold in the semblance of living maids. In them is understanding in their hearts, and in them speech 18.420. /and strength, and they know cunning handiwork by gift of the immortal gods. These busily moved to support their lord, and he, limping nigh to where Thetis was, sat him down upon a shining chair; and he clasped her by the hand, and spake, and addressed her:Wherefore, long-robed Thetis, art thou come to our house
8. Homer, Odyssey, 6.233, 11.368 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

9. Semonides of Amorgos, Fragments, 7 (7th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

10. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 562-886, 561 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

561. τίς γῆ; τί γένος; τίνα φῶ λεύσσειν 561. What land is this? What people? By what name am I to call the one I see exposed to the tempest in bonds of rock? What offence have you committed that as punishment you are doomed to destruction?
11. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 562, 573-574, 587-588, 644, 561 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

561. πυκνοῦ κροτησμοῦ τυγχάνουσʼ ὑπὸ πτόλιν.
12. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 2.37-2.40 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

680b. Ath. Everybody, I believe, gives the name of headship to the government which then existed,—and it still continues to exist to-day among both Greeks and barbarians in many quarters. And, of course, Homer mentions its existence in connection with the household system of the Cyclopes, where he says— No halls of council and no laws are theirs, But within hollow caves on mountain heights Aloft they dwell, each making his own law.
14. Aristotle, Politics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

15. Septuagint, Judith, 2.3, 10.7, 10.23 (2nd cent. BCE - 0th cent. CE)

2.3. and it was decided that every one who had not obeyed his command should be destroyed. 10.7. When they saw her, and noted how her face was altered and her clothing changed, they greatly admired her beauty, and said to her 10.23. And when Judith came into the presence of Holofernes and his servants, they all marveled at the beauty of her face; and she prostrated herself and made obeisance to him, and his slaves raised her up.
16. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.82-1.88 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.4.1, 3.14.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.4.1. Κάδμος δὲ ἀποθανοῦσαν θάψας Τηλέφασσαν, ὑπὸ Θρακῶν ξενισθείς, ἦλθεν εἰς Δελφοὺς περὶ τῆς Εὐρώπης πυνθανόμενος. ὁ δὲ θεὸς εἶπε περὶ μὲν Εὐρώπης μὴ πολυπραγμονεῖν, χρῆσθαι δὲ καθοδηγῷ βοΐ, καὶ πόλιν κτίζειν ἔνθα ἂν αὕτη 1 -- πέσῃ καμοῦσα. τοιοῦτον λαβὼν χρησμὸν διὰ Φωκέων ἐπορεύετο, εἶτα βοῒ συντυχὼν ἐν τοῖς Πελάγοντος βουκολίοις ταύτῃ κατόπισθεν εἵπετο. ἡ δὲ διεξιοῦσα Βοιωτίαν ἐκλίθη, πόλις ἔνθα νῦν εἰσι Θῆβαι. 2 -- βουλόμενος δὲ Ἀθηνᾷ καταθῦσαι τὴν βοῦν, πέμπει τινὰς τῶν μεθʼ ἑαυτοῦ ληψομένους 3 -- ἀπὸ τῆς Ἀρείας κρήνης ὕδωρ· φρουρῶν δὲ τὴν κρήνην δράκων, ὃν ἐξ Ἄρεος εἶπόν τινες γεγονέναι, τοὺς πλείονας τῶν πεμφθέντων διέφθειρεν. ἀγανακτήσας δὲ Κάδμος κτείνει τὸν δράκοντα, καὶ τῆς Ἀθηνᾶς ὑποθεμένης τοὺς ὀδόντας αὐτοῦ σπείρει. τούτων δὲ σπαρέντων ἀνέτειλαν ἐκ γῆς ἄνδρες ἔνοπλοι, οὓς ἐκάλεσαν Σπαρτούς. οὗτοι δὲ ἀπέκτειναν ἀλλήλους, οἱ μὲν εἰς ἔριν ἀκούσιον 4 -- ἐλθόντες, οἱ δὲ ἀγνοοῦντες. Φερεκύδης δέ φησιν ὅτι Κάδμος, ἰδὼν ἐκ γῆς ἀναφυομένους ἄνδρας ἐνόπλους, ἐπʼ αὐτοὺς ἔβαλε 1 -- λίθους, οἱ δὲ ὑπʼ ἀλλήλων νομίζοντες βάλλεσθαι εἰς μάχην κατέστησαν. περιεσώθησαν δὲ πέντε, Ἐχίων Οὐδαῖος Χθονίος Ὑπερήνωρ Πέλωρος. 2 -- 3.14.6. Κραναὸν δὲ ἐκβαλὼν Ἀμφικτύων ἐβασίλευσε· τοῦτον ἔνιοι μὲν Δευκαλίωνος, ἔνιοι δὲ αὐτόχθονα 3 -- λέγουσι. βασιλεύσαντα δὲ αὐτὸν ἔτη 4 -- δώδεκα Ἐριχθόνιος ἐκβάλλει. τοῦτον οἱ μὲν Ἡφαίστου καὶ τῆς Κραναοῦ θυγατρὸς Ἀτθίδος εἶναι λέγουσιν, οἱ δὲ Ἡφαίστου καὶ Ἀθηνᾶς, οὕτως· Ἀθηνᾶ παρεγένετο πρὸς Ἥφαιστον, ὅπλα κατασκευάσαι θέλουσα. ὁ δὲ ἐγκαταλελειμμένος 5 -- ὑπὸ Ἀφροδίτης εἰς ἐπιθυμίαν ὤλισθε τῆς Ἀθηνᾶς, καὶ διώκειν αὐτὴν ἤρξατο· ἡ δὲ ἔφευγεν. ὡς δὲ ἐγγὺς αὐτῆς ἐγένετο πολλῇ ἀνάγκῃ (ἦν γὰρ χωλός), ἐπειρᾶτο συνελθεῖν. ἡ δὲ ὡς σώφρων καὶ παρθένος οὖσα οὐκ ἠνέσχετο· ὁ δὲ ἀπεσπέρμηνεν εἰς τὸ σκέλος τῆς θεᾶς. ἐκείνη δὲ μυσαχθεῖσα ἐρίῳ ἀπομάξασα τὸν γόνον εἰς γῆν ἔρριψε. φευγούσης δὲ αὐτῆς καὶ τῆς γονῆς εἰς γῆν πεσούσης Ἐριχθόνιος γίνεται. τοῦτον Ἀθηνᾶ κρύφα τῶν ἄλλων θεῶν ἔτρεφεν, ἀθάνατον θέλουσα ποιῆσαι· καὶ καταθεῖσα αὐτὸν εἰς κίστην Πανδρόσῳ τῇ Κέκροπος παρακατέθετο, ἀπειποῦσα τὴν κίστην ἀνοίγειν. αἱ δὲ ἀδελφαὶ τῆς Πανδρόσου ἀνοίγουσιν ὑπὸ περιεργίας, καὶ θεῶνται τῷ βρέφει παρεσπειραμένον δράκοντα· καὶ ὡς μὲν ἔνιοι λέγουσιν, ὑπʼ αὐτοῦ διεφθάρησαν τοῦ δράκοντος, ὡς δὲ ἔνιοι, διʼ ὀργὴν Ἀθηνᾶς ἐμμανεῖς γενόμεναι κατὰ τῆς ἀκροπόλεως αὑτὰς ἔρριψαν. ἐν δὲ τῷ τεμένει τραφεὶς Ἐριχθόνιος ὑπʼ αὐτῆς Ἀθηνᾶς, ἐκβαλὼν Ἀμφικτύονα ἐβασίλευσεν Ἀθηνῶν, καὶ τὸ ἐν ἀκροπόλει ξόανον τῆς Ἀθηνᾶς ἱδρύσατο, καὶ τῶν Παναθηναίων τὴν ἑορτὴν συνεστήσατο, καὶ Πραξιθέαν 1 -- νηίδα νύμφην ἔγημεν, ἐξ ἧς αὐτῷ παῖς Πανδίων ἐγεννήθη.
18. New Testament, 1 Timothy, 1.11-1.14 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.11. according to the gospel of the glory of the blessed God, which was committed to my trust. 1.12. And I thank him who enabled me, Christ Jesus our Lord, because he counted me faithful, appointing me to service; 1.13. although I was before a blasphemer, a persecutor, and insolent. However, I obtained mercy, because I did it ignorantly in unbelief. 1.14. The grace of our Lord abounded exceedingly with faith and love which is in Christ Jesus.
19. Statius, Thebais, 2.273-2.276, 2.283-2.284 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.24.4-1.24.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.24.4. and there are statues of Zeus, one made by Leochares See Paus. 1.1.3 . and one called Polieus (Urban), the customary mode of sacrificing to whom I will give without adding the traditional reason thereof. Upon the altar of Zeus Polieus they place barley mixed with wheat and leave it unguarded. The ox, which they keep already prepared for sacrifice, goes to the altar and partakes of the grain. One of the priests they call the ox-slayer, who kills the ox and then, casting aside the axe here according to the ritual runs away. The others bring the axe to trial, as though they know not the man who did the deed. 1.24.5. Their ritual, then, is such as I have described. As you enter the temple that they name the Parthenon, all the sculptures you see on what is called the pediment refer to the birth of Athena, those on the rear pediment represent the contest for the land between Athena and Poseidon. The statue itself is made of ivory and gold. On the middle of her helmet is placed a likeness of the Sphinx—the tale of the Sphinx I will give when I come to my description of Boeotia—and on either side of the helmet are griffins in relief.
21. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.96 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.96 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

23. Tertullian, On Baptism, 17.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

24. Origen, Against Celsus, 3.44, 3.59 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3.44. After these points Celsus quotes some objections against the doctrine of Jesus, made by a very few individuals who are considered Christians, not of the more intelligent, as he supposes, but of the more ignorant class, and asserts that the following are the rules laid down by them. Let no one come to us who has been instructed, or who is wise or prudent (for such qualifications are deemed evil by us); but if there be any ignorant, or unintelligent, or uninstructed, or foolish persons, let them come with confidence. By which words, acknowledging that such individuals are worthy of their God, they manifestly show that they desire and are able to gain over only the silly, and the mean, and the stupid, with women and children. In reply to which, we say that, as if, while Jesus teaches continence, and says, Whosoever looks upon a woman to lust after her, has already committed adultery with her in his heart, one were to behold a few of those who are deemed to be Christians living licentiously, he would most justly blame them for living contrary to the teaching of Jesus, but would act most unreasonably if he were to charge the Gospel with their censurable conduct; so, if he found nevertheless that the doctrine of the Christians invites men to wisdom, the blame then must remain with those who rest in their own ignorance, and who utter, not what Celsus relates (for although some of them are simple and ignorant, they do not speak so shamelessly as he alleges), but other things of much less serious import, which, however, serve to turn aside men from the practice of wisdom. 3.59. Immediately after this, Celsus, perceiving that he has slandered us with too great bitterness, as if by way of defense expresses himself as follows: That I bring no heavier charge than what the truth compels me, any one may see from the following remarks. Those who invite to participation in other mysteries, make proclamation as follows: 'Every one who has clean hands, and a prudent tongue;' others again thus: 'He who is pure from all pollution, and whose soul is conscious of no evil, and who has lived well and justly.' Such is the proclamation made by those who promise purification from sins. But let us hear what kind of persons these Christians invite. Every one, they say, who is a sinner, who is devoid of understanding, who is a child, and, to speak generally, whoever is unfortunate, him will the kingdom of God receive. Do you not call him a sinner, then, who is unjust, and a thief, and a housebreaker, and a poisoner, and a committer of sacrilege, and a robber of the dead? What others would a man invite if he were issuing a proclamation for an assembly of robbers? Now, in answer to such statements, we say that it is not the same thing to invite those who are sick in soul to be cured, and those who are in health to the knowledge and study of divine things. We, however, keeping both these things in view, at first invite all men to be healed, and exhort those who are sinners to come to the consideration of the doctrines which teach men not to sin, and those who are devoid of understanding to those which beget wisdom, and those who are children to rise in their thoughts to manhood, and those who are simply unfortunate to good fortune, or - which is the more appropriate term to use - to blessedness. And when those who have been turned towards virtue have made progress, and have shown that they have been purified by the word, and have led as far as they can a better life, then and not before do we invite them to participation in our mysteries. For we speak wisdom among them that are perfect.
25. Plotinus, Enneads, (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

26. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 2.29-2.30 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.29. 29.For formerly, as we have before observed, when men sacrificed to the Gods fruits and not animals, and did not assume the latter for food, it is said, that a common sacrifice being celebrated at Athens, one Diomus, or Sopater, who was not a native, but cultivated some land in Attica, seizing a sharp axe which was near to him, and being excessively indigt, struck with it an ox, who, coming from his labour, approached to a table, on which were openly placed cakes and other offerings which were to be burnt as a sacrifice to the Gods, and ate some, but trampled on the rest of the offerings. The ox, therefore, being killed, Diomus, whose anger was now appeased, at the same time perceived what kind of deed he had perpetrated. And the ox, indeed, he buried. But embracing a voluntary banishment, as if he had been accused of impiety, he fled to Crete. A great dryness, however, taking place in the Attic land from vehement heat, and a dreadful sterility of fruit, and the Pythian deity being in consequence of it consulted by the general consent, the God answered, that the Cretan exile must expiate the crime; and that, if the murderer was punished, and the statue of the slain ox was erected in the place in which it fell, this would be beneficial both to those who had and those who had not tasted its flesh. An inquiry therefore being made into the affair, and Sopater, together with the deed, having been discovered, he, thinking that he should be liberated from the difficulty in which he was now involved, through the accusation of impiety, if the same thing was done by all men in common, said to those who came to him, that it was necessary an ox should be slain by the city. But, on their being dubious who should strike the ox, he said that he would undertake to do it, if they would make him a citizen, and would be partakers with him of the slaughter. This, therefore, being granted, they returned to the city, and ordered the deed to be accomplished in such a way as it is performed by them at present, [and which was as follows:] SPAN 2.30. 30.They selected virgins who were drawers of water; but these brought water for the purpose of sharpening an axe and a knife. And these being sharpened, one person gave the axe, another struck with it the ox, |62 and a third person cut the throat of the ox. But after this, having excoriated the animal, all that were present ate of its flesh. These things therefore being performed, they sewed up the hide of the ox, and having stuffed it with straw, raised it upright in the same form which it had when alive, and yoked it to a plough, as if it was about to work with it. Instituting also a judicial process, respecting the slaughter of the ox, they cited all those who were partakers of the deed, to defend their conduct. But as the drawers of water accused those who sharpened the axe and the knife, as more culpable than themselves, and those who sharpened these instruments accused him who gave the axe, and he accused him who cut the throat of the ox, and this last person accused the knife,---hence, as the knife could not speak, they condemned it as the cause of the slaughter. From that time also, even till now, during the festival sacred to Jupiter, in the Acropolis, at Athens, the sacrifice of an ox is performed after the same manner. For, placing cakes on a brazen table, they drive oxen round it, and the ox that tastes of the cakes that are distributed on the table, is slain. The race likewise of those who perform this, still remains. And all those, indeed, who derive their origin from Sopater are called boutupoi [i.e. slayers of oxen]; but those who are descended from him that drove the ox round the table, are called kentriadai, [or stimulators.] And those who originate from him that cut the throat of the ox, are denominated daitroi, [or dividers,] on account of the banquet which takes place from the distribution of flesh. But when they have filled the hide, and the judicial process is ended, they throw the knife into the sea. SPAN
27. Jerome, Letters, 133.4 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

28. Jerome, Letters, 133.4 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

29. Jerome, Letters, 133.4 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

30. Epigraphy, Ig I , 82

31. Epigraphy, Ig I , 82

32. Epigraphy, Seg, 33.147

33. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 14-18, 8, 12

34. Papyri, Derveni Papyrus, 21.5, 21.7



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
absalom Gera, Judith (2014) 339
achilles Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 78
adornment Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
adrasteia Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56
aetiology Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 44
aianteia Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 161
aidos Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 29
anchises Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32
anthropogony, in early cosmology Bartninkas, Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy (2023) 101
anthropogony, in religious tradition Bartninkas, Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy (2023) 101
anthropology, historical anthropology Bosak-Schroeder, Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography (2020) 24
aphrodite, and pandora Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 35
aphrodite Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 25; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 78; Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 85; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32; Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56; Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 189; Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 89
aphrodite urania Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
aphrodites birth by the ejaculation of zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
aphrodites births Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
apollo; crowned Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 125
apollo Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 161
ariadne Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
aristotle Bosak-Schroeder, Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography (2020) 24
athena, a. ergane Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 25
athena, parthenos Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 35
athena, spinning and weaving Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 25
athena, technical skills Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 35
athena Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58; Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 85; Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56; Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 189; Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 89
athena parthenos, pheidias, iconography Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
athenaia Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 24
athens, erechtheion Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
audience Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 39, 44
beauty Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 25; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 77, 78; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32
bed, conjugal, delivery bed Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32
bios (way of life) Bosak-Schroeder, Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography (2020) 24
book of judith, author Gera, Judith (2014) 339
book of judith, exaggerated numbers Gera, Judith (2014) 339
bread McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63
catullus Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
chalkeia Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 24
charis Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 189
charites Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32; Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 189
cincius alimentus Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
ciris Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
clay Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 44
collegia McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63
container, filling of, pandora and Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 189
cosmogony Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 39
creation narratives, in hesiods works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 16
cronus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
crowned Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 125
crushing, death by Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
cultural history Bosak-Schroeder, Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography (2020) 24
cyprian, letter McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63
deception Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 84, 85
demeter Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58; Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56
democritus Bosak-Schroeder, Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography (2020) 24
dicaearchus of messana, influence of aristotle on Bosak-Schroeder, Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography (2020) 24
dicaearchus of messana Bosak-Schroeder, Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography (2020) 24
dionysus of halicarnassus Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
dios apate Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32
dipolieia Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
discrepancy, between words and deeds Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 77, 78
divination, the delphic oracle Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88
dyad Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56
earth Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
emotional restraint, narratology of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
emotions, agony de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
emotions, anger/rage de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153
emotions, love/passion de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153
epimetheus Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 35; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 78
epitaphia Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 161
erga Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 25
eris Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 77, 78
eros Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32
ethics Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 29
exempla and exemplarity Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
fabius pictor Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
falsehood Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 85
fates Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56
fear Gera, Judith (2014) 339
fire Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 39; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 29
fish McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63
gaia Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
gamos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32
gender, poetry and Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 85
gifts Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 77, 78
god/goddess Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 44
goddesses, textile work Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 35
gods, births of the gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58; Gerolemou and Kazantzidis, Body and Machine in Classical Antiquity (2023) 72; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 29
gods as elements, names of the gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
gods as elements, olympian gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
graces Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 25
greed and bribery and acquisitiveness Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
hades (god) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
harmonia Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
helen Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 78; Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56
helen of sparta/troy Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
hellenistic and roman myth/history, literature Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
hephaestus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 24, 25; Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 35; Gerolemou and Kazantzidis, Body and Machine in Classical Antiquity (2023) 72; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 78; Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 85
hephaisteion, athens, anthemon Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
hephaisteion, athens, inscription of construction accounts Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
hephaisteion, athens, technique and structure Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
hephaistia Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 161
hephaistos Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 189
hera, adornment Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32
hera, seduction Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32
hera Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58; Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 84; Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
heracles/hercules, greek heracles de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
hermaia Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 161
hermes Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 25; Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 35; Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 85; Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 89
heroism Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 42
hesiod, myth of the races in Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 37, 52
hesiod, on female and male Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88, 89, 90
hesiod, on prometheus and pandora Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88, 90
hesiod, on zeus Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88, 89, 90
hesiod, pheidian circle and Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
hesiod, the muses address Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88, 89, 90
hesiod, theogony Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 16
hesiod, works and days Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 9; Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 16
hesiod Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58; Bosak-Schroeder, Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography (2020) 24; Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 35; Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 39, 44; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 77, 78; Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 37, 52; Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 16; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153, 296
hestia Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
holophernes, feminized Gera, Judith (2014) 339
holophernes Gera, Judith (2014) 339
homer Bosak-Schroeder, Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography (2020) 24; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 77, 78; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 29
homicide Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
horai Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 25; Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 189
humanoids Gerolemou and Kazantzidis, Body and Machine in Classical Antiquity (2023) 72
hypnos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32
ida, mount Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32
io de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
judith, beautiful and seductive Gera, Judith (2014) 339
justice Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 77, 78; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 29
juxtaposition Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 39
kalon kakon Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
knowledge Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 39
kos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
language and style, book of judith, calques and hebraicisms Gera, Judith (2014) 339
leaving the city, as a metaliterary metaphor Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 77, 78
lie Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 85
life of greece (dicaearchus of messana) Bosak-Schroeder, Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography (2020) 24
locative Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 42
love, eros, and sexuality Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
lucilla, and the donatist schism Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 159
luxury and anti-luxury Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
magic Gerolemou and Kazantzidis, Body and Machine in Classical Antiquity (2023) 72
magnification Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 373
marriage Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32
maternal-material-thesis Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56
mecone Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86
medea Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
metallic races Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 16
metals, bronze Gerolemou and Kazantzidis, Body and Machine in Classical Antiquity (2023) 72
metals, gold Gerolemou and Kazantzidis, Body and Machine in Classical Antiquity (2023) 72
mise en abyme de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
misogyny, hesiod Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 35
misogyny Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 35
moses; implied author of genesis Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 125
muses, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 77, 78
muses Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 29; Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56
myth Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
myth of ages/golden age Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 29
mythology Gerolemou and Kazantzidis, Body and Machine in Classical Antiquity (2023) 72
mêtis Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88, 89, 90
narratology, affective/cognitive de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153
nature Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 44
necessity Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56
nemesis Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 29
neoteric literature Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
nightingale, in works and days Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 9
oceanus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
okeanos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32
olympian Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 39
optatus, account of lucilla Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 159
optatus, scholarly readings of Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 159
ovid Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
pain/suffering de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
panathenaia, greater Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 161
pandora, fabrication of Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 189
pandora, in hesiod Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 52
pandora Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 24, 25; Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 35; Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 39, 44; Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86; Gera, Judith (2014) 339; Gerolemou and Kazantzidis, Body and Machine in Classical Antiquity (2023) 72; Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 297; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 77, 78; Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 84, 85; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32; Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60; Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56; Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 16; Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 189
paris Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 78
parthenius Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
parthenoi, goddesses Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 35
parthenos/parthenoi Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32
pastoralism Bosak-Schroeder, Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography (2020) 24
pathos (πάθος) de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
peisidice Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
peitho Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 189
peitho (persuasion) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
perses Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 77, 78
petelia, hipponion Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 42
pherecydes; prose author Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 125
phrygia Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32
piety Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 29
poet-patron relationship Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 85
poetic etymology Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 77, 78
poetry, and aristocratic power Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 77, 78
politics (aristotle) Bosak-Schroeder, Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography (2020) 24
poseidon Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
procession and emanation Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56
processions Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 161
prometheia Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 161
prometheus, in hesiod Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 52
prometheus Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 39, 44; Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86; Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 78; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 29; Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 16; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153, 296
prometheus bound de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
prophecy Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 29
protogonos (orphic god) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
prytaneion/is Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
pseudos Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 85
races, in hesiods works Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 16
races, metallic Star, Apocalypse and Golden Age: The End of the World in Greek and Roman Thought (2021) 16
races of men Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 44
receptivity, and the female Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56
relics, veneration of Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 159
religion Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 35
rhapsodies (orphic poem) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
rhea Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56
rite de passage, sacrifice Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 42
rite de passage Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 42; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
sacrifice, cuisine of' McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63
sacrifice Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642; McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63; Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88
saturninus, claudius; author of on crowns Sider, Christian and Pagan in the Roman Empire: The Witness of Tertullian (2001) 125
scylla Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
seduction, female Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 84
semonides Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 84, 85
setting Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 44
sexual intercourse or reproduction Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56
sexual reproduction, pandora and Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 189
sexuality Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32
sicyon Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86
sicyonians Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86
simylus Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
sinai, single man Gera, Judith (2014) 339
sky Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
soul, female souls Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56
statue bases of pheidian circle, iconography Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
statue bases of pheidian circle, technique Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
statue bases of pheidian circle Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
statues, and sexual reproduction Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 189
statues Gerolemou and Kazantzidis, Body and Machine in Classical Antiquity (2023) 72
strife Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 29
sulleia Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 161
talos Gerolemou and Kazantzidis, Body and Machine in Classical Antiquity (2023) 72
technical skills' "458.0_35.0@textile work, goddesses'" Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 35
tents, holophernes Gera, Judith (2014) 339
tethys Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32
theseia Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 161
thucydides Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 37
torch-race Henderson, The Springtime of the People: The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus (2020) 161
transformation Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 44
treasonous girl mytheme Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
trojan war, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 78
underworld Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
uranus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
uranus phallus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
veil Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 32
vernant, jean-pierre Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86
voice, an automatons Gerolemou and Kazantzidis, Body and Machine in Classical Antiquity (2023) 72
wife, athena and Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 35
women, and story of lucilla Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 159
women, as centerpieces of heresies Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 159
women, as primary transgressors Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 159
women and girls, as weakness Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
women and girls, motivations of Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 26
works and days (hesiod) Bosak-Schroeder, Other Natures: Environmental Encounters with Ancient Greek Ethnography (2020) 24
works and days , as model of georgics Perkell, The Poet's Truth: A Study of the Poet in Virgil's Georgics (1989) 9
zeitlin, froma Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 189
zeus, polieus Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58; Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 39, 44; Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 77, 78; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 29; Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 84, 85; Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 56; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153, 296
zeus new creation of the world Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58
θόρνηι Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 58