Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6471
Hesiod, Works And Days, 336-337


κὰδ δύναμιν δʼ ἔρδειν ἱέρʼ ἀθανάτοισι θεοῖσινShould not be seized – god-sent, it’s better far.


ἁγνῶς καὶ καθαρῶς, ἐπὶ δʼ ἀγλαὰ μηρία καίειν·If someone steals great riches by dure


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

23 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 183-192, 213-335, 337-359, 36, 360-771, 775-776, 804, 813-828, 182 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

182. All-seeing Zeus produced, who populated
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 533-537, 532 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

532. Revenge for crafty Cronus’ progeny.
3. Homer, Iliad, 1.460-1.463, 2.422-2.425 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.460. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.461. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.462. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.463. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 2.422. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.423. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.424. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.425. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits.
4. Homer, Odyssey, 6.120, 14.434-14.436, 23.233-23.238 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 1006-1012, 1005 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1005. ἀναβράττετ' ἐξοπτᾶτε τρέπετ' ἀφέλκετε
6. Aristophanes, Peace, 1040, 1039 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1039. ταυτὶ δέδραται. τίθεσο τὼ μηρὼ λαβών.
7. Euripides, Electra, 171 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

171. ἀγγέλλει δ' ὅτι νῦν τριταί-
8. Herodotus, Histories, 1.188, 4.35 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.188. Cyrus, then, marched against Nitocris' son, who inherited the name of his father Labynetus and the sovereignty of Assyria. Now when the Great King campaigns, he marches well provided with food and flocks from home; and water from the Choaspes river that flows past Susa is carried with him, the only river from which the king will drink. ,This water of the Choaspes is boiled, and very many four-wheeled wagons drawn by mules carry it in silver vessels, following the king wherever he goes at any time. 4.35. In this way, then, these maidens are honored by the inhabitants of Delos. These same Delians relate that two virgins, Arge and Opis, came from the Hyperboreans by way of the aforesaid peoples to Delos earlier than Hyperoche and Laodice; ,these latter came to bring to Eileithyia the tribute which they had agreed to pay for easing child-bearing; but Arge and Opis, they say, came with the gods themselves, and received honors of their own from the Delians. ,For the women collected gifts for them, calling upon their names in the hymn made for them by Olen of Lycia; it was from Delos that the islanders and Ionians learned to sing hymns to Opis and Arge, calling upon their names and collecting gifts (this Olen, after coming from Lycia, also made the other and ancient hymns that are sung at Delos). ,Furthermore, they say that when the thighbones are burnt in sacrifice on the altar, the ashes are all cast on the burial-place of Opis and Arge, behind the temple of Artemis, looking east, nearest the refectory of the people of Ceos.
9. Sophocles, Antigone, 1006-1011, 1005 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Xenophon, Apology, 11 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Xenophon, Memoirs, 1.1.2, 1.1.20, 1.3.3, 2.2.13 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.1.2. First then, that he rejected the gods acknowledged by the state — what evidence did they produce of that? He offered sacrifices constantly, and made no secret of it, now in his home, now at the altars of the state temples, and he made use of divination with as little secrecy. Indeed it had become notorious that Socrates claimed to be guided by the deity: That immanent divine something, as Cicero terms it, which Socrates claimed as his peculiar possession. it was out of this claim, I think, that the charge of bringing in strange deities arose. 1.1.20. I wonder, then, how the Athenians can have been persuaded that Socrates was a freethinker, when he never said or did anything contrary to sound religion, and his utterances about the gods and his behaviour towards them were the words and actions of a man who is truly religious and deserves to be thought so. 1.3.3. Though his sacrifices were humble, according to his means, he thought himself not a whit inferior to those who made frequent and magnificent sacrifices out of great possessions. The gods (he said) could not well delight more in great offerings than in small — for in that case must the gifts of the wicked often have found more favour in their sight than the gifts of the upright — and man would not find life worth having, if the gifts of the wicked were received with more favour by the gods than the gifts of the upright. No, the greater the piety of the giver, the greater (he thought) was the delight of the gods in the gift. He would quote with approval the line: According to thy power render sacrifice to the immortal gods, Hes. WD 336 and he would add that in our treatment of friends and strangers, and in all our behaviour, it is a noble principle to render according to our power. 2.2.13. And yet, when you are resolved to cultivate these, you don’t think courtesy is due to your mother, who loves you more than all? Don’t you know that even the state ignores all other forms of ingratitude and pronounces no judgment on them, Cyropaedia I. ii. 7. caring nothing if the recipient of a favour neglects to thank his benefactor, but inflicts penalties on the man who is discourteous to his parents and rejects him as unworthy of office, holding that it would be a sin for him to offer sacrifices on behalf of the state and that he is unlikely to do anything else honourably and rightly? Aye, and if one fail to honour his parents’ graves, the state inquires into that too, when it examines the candidates for office.
12. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

13. Demosthenes, Against Neaera, 97 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

14. Demosthenes, On The Crown, 267 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

15. Menander, Dyscolus, 448-453, 447 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

16. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.80-1.101, 2.317-2.322, 2.352-2.373, 2.594-2.595, 2.992-2.997, 2.1157-2.1174, 5.206-5.217, 5.864-5.870, 5.933-5.936, 5.1110-5.1111, 5.1165-5.1167, 5.1194-5.1240, 5.1247-5.1248, 5.1289-5.1296, 5.1361-5.1404, 5.1448 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

17. Vergil, Georgics, 1.316-1.334, 1.489, 2.323-2.345 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.316. And when the first breath of his panting steed 1.317. On us the Orient flings, that hour with them 1.318. Red Vesper 'gins to trim his 'lated fires. 1.319. Hence under doubtful skies forebode we can 1.320. The coming tempests, hence both harvest-day 1.321. And seed-time, when to smite the treacherous main 1.322. With driving oars, when launch the fair-rigged fleet 1.323. Or in ripe hour to fell the forest-pine. 1.324. Hence, too, not idly do we watch the stars— 1.325. Their rising and their setting-and the year 1.326. Four varying seasons to one law conformed. 1.327. If chilly showers e'er shut the farmer's door 1.328. Much that had soon with sunshine cried for haste 1.329. He may forestall; the ploughman batters keen 1.330. His blunted share's hard tooth, scoops from a tree 1.331. His troughs, or on the cattle stamps a brand 1.332. Or numbers on the corn-heaps; some make sharp 1.333. The stakes and two-pronged forks, and willow-band 1.334. Amerian for the bending vine prepare. 1.489. Now duck their head beneath the wave, now run 2.323. A glance will serve to warn thee which is black 2.324. Or what the hue of any. But hard it i 2.325. To track the signs of that pernicious cold: 2.326. Pines only, noxious yews, and ivies dark 2.327. At times reveal its traces. 2.328. All these rule 2.329. Regarding, let your land, ay, long before 2.330. Scorch to the quick, and into trenches carve 2.331. The mighty mountains, and their upturned clod 2.332. Bare to the north wind, ere thou plant therein 2.333. The vine's prolific kindred. Fields whose soil 2.334. Is crumbling are the best: winds look to that 2.335. And bitter hoar-frosts, and the delver's toil 2.336. Untiring, as he stirs the loosened glebe. 2.337. But those, whose vigilance no care escapes 2.338. Search for a kindred site, where first to rear 2.339. A nursery for the trees, and eke whereto 2.340. Soon to translate them, lest the sudden shock 2.341. From their new mother the young plants estrange. 2.342. Nay, even the quarter of the sky they brand 2.343. Upon the bark, that each may be restored 2.344. As erst it stood, here bore the southern heats 2.345. Here turned its shoulder to the northern pole;
18. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 2.232 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Tacitus, Annals, 2.54 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.54.  From Athens he visited Euboea, and crossed over to Lesbos; where Agrippina, in her last confinement, gave birth to Julia. Entering the outskirts of Asia, and the Thracian towns of Perinthus and Byzantium, he then struck through the straits of the Bosphorus and the mouth of the Euxine, eager to make the acquaintance of those ancient and storied regions, though simultaneously he brought relief to provinces outworn by internecine feud or official tyranny. On the return journey, he made an effort to visit the Samothracian Mysteries, but was met by northerly winds, and failed to make the shore. So, after an excursion to Troy and those venerable remains which attest the mutability of fortune and the origin of Rome, he skirted the Asian coast once more, and anchored off Colophon, in order to consult the oracle of the Clarian Apollo. Here it is not a prophetess, as at Delphi, but a male priest, chosen out of a restricted number of families, and in most cases imported from Miletus, who hears the number and the names of the consultants, but no more, then descends into a cavern, swallows a draught of water from a mysterious spring, and — though ignorant generally of writing and of metre — delivers his response in set verses dealing with the subject each inquirer had in mind. Rumour said that he had predicted to Germanicus his hastening fate, though in the equivocal terms which oracles affect.
20. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.34.4, 5.13.9, 8.38.8, 9.2.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.34.4. The Oropians have near the temple a spring, which they call the Spring of Amphiaraus; they neither sacrifice into it nor are wont to use it for purifications or for lustral water. But when a man has been cured of a disease through a response the custom is to throw silver and coined gold into the spring, for by this way they say that Amphiaraus rose up after he had become a god. Iophon the Cnossian, a guide, produced responses in hexameter verse, saying that Amphiaraus gave them to the Argives who were sent against Thebes . These verses unrestrainedly appealed to popular taste. Except those whom they say Apollo inspired of old none of the seers uttered oracles, but they were good at explaining dreams and interpreting the flights of birds and the entrails of victims. 5.13.9. The first stage of the altar at Olympia, called prothysis, has a circumference of one hundred and twenty-five feet; the circumference of the stage on the prothysis is thirty-two feet; the total height of the altar reaches to twenty-two feet. The victims themselves it is the custom to sacrifice on the lower stage, the prothysis. But the thighs they carry up to the highest part of the altar and burn them there. 8.38.8. On the east side of the mountain there is a sanctuary of Apollo surnamed Parrhasian. They also give him the name Pythian. They hold every year a festival in honor of the god and sacrifice in the market-place a boar to Apollo Helper, and after the sacrifice here they at once carry the victim to the sanctuary of Parrhasian Apollo in procession to the music of the flute; cutting out the thigh-bones they burn them, and also consume the meat of the victim on the spot. 9.2.1. On Mount Cithaeron, within the territory of Plataea, if you turn off to the right for a little way from the straight road, you reach the ruins of Hysiae and Erythrae. Once they were cities of Boeotia, and even at the present day among the ruins of Hysiae are a half-finished temple of Apollo and a sacred well. According to the Boeotian story oracles were obtained of old from the well by drinking of it.
21. Iamblichus, Concerning The Mysteries, 3.11 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

22. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 2.16 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.16. 16.Theopompus likewise narrates things similar to these, viz. that a certain Magnesian came from Asia to Delphi; a man very rich, and abounding in cattle, and that he was accustomed every year to make many and magnificent sacrifices to the Gods, partly through the abundance of his possessions, and partly through piety and wishing to please the Gods. But being thus disposed, he came to the divinity at Delphi, bringing with him a hecatomb for the God, and magnificently honouring Apollo, he consulted his oracle. Conceiving also that he worshipped the Gods in a manner more beautiful than that of all other men, he asked the Pythian deity who the man was that, with the greatest promptitude, and in the best manner, venerated divinity, and |53 made the most acceptable sacrifices, conceiving that on this occasion the God would deem him to be pre-eminent. The Pythian deity however answered, that Clearchus, who dwelt in Methydrium, a town of Arcadia, worshipped the Gods in a way surpassing that of all other men. But the Magnesian being astonished, was desirous of seeing Clearchus, and of learning from him the manner in which he performed his sacrifices. Swiftly, therefore, betaking himself to Methydrium, in the first place, indeed, he despised the smallness and vileness of the town, conceiving that neither any private person, nor even the whole city, could honour the Gods more magnificently and more beautifully than he did. Meeting, however, with the man, he thought fit to ask him after what manner he reverenced the Gods. But Clearchus answered him, that he diligently sacrificed to them at proper times in every month at the new moon, crowning and adorning the statues of Hermes and Hecate, and the other sacred images which were left to us by our ancestors, and that he also honoured the Gods with frankincense, and sacred wafers and cakes. He likewise said, that he performed public sacrifices annually, omitting no festive day; and that in these festivals he worshipped the Gods, not by slaying oxen, nor by cutting victims into fragments, but that he sacrificed whatever he might casually meet with, sedulously offering the first-fruits to the Gods of all the vegetable productions of the seasons, and of all the fruits with which he was supplied. He added, that some of these he placed before the [statues of the] Gods,6 but that he burnt others on their altars; and that, being studious of frugality, he avoided the sacrificing of oxen. SPAN
23. Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters, 3.6 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 79
aelius aristides MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 34
agos, allusions to in hesiod Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 47
agricultural calendar Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 84
alexander the great Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
altars, bones burned on Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
anger, divine Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 47, 49, 50
animals, asictims Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
apollo Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
appraisal theory de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 163
archedamos Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168
argos Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168
aristides Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
aristophanes Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 79
aristotle, on honouring the gods Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62
asclepius MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 34; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
audience, gregorys MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 34
banquet Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 133
blend of cognition and emotion de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 163
boeotia Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
bones Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
boundary Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 133
ceres Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 70
choaspes Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
chthonic deities Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
cilicia Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
city of the just, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 83
claros Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
clearchus Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
cognitive linguistics Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 65
comedy Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 331
corinth Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168
country Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 133
cydnus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
daimones, of plato Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
damascius Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168
dedications, and wealth Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62
dedications, honouring the gods Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62
delos Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
delphi Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
demeter Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168
demosthenes Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 331
dikê (and cognates), usage Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 65
dio chrysostom Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
discrepancy, between words and deeds Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 83, 84
divine (δίκη), in context of guestfriendship Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 65
divine (δίκη), in context of parents and children Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 65
divine (δίκη), in context of rituals of worship Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 65
divine (δίκη), in context of supplication Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 65
divine punishment/retribution Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 47, 50
divine watchers in hesiod Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 47, 49
drama Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 331
emotions, admiration/awe de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 163
emotions, anger/rage de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 163
emotions, disappointment de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 163
emotions, joy de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 163
emotions, love/passion de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 163
emotions, sorrow de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 163
epic Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
epicurus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 70
eris Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 83
euripides Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 331
eurymedon Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
fat Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
festivals, theopompus on Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
food Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 84
gifts Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 83, 84
gods, in lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 70
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 70
gods Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
good speech, and proper respect for gods Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
good speech, at sacrifices Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
gregory of nazianus, audience MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 34
hagnos, coupled with katharos Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 49
halikarnassos. mausoleum Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
hand-washing, ritual Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 47, 49, 50
health Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
hecuba Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 331
hera Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168
heroes, as deities, proper respect for Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
hesiod, allusions to Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 70
hesiod, on sacrifice Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
hesiod Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 83, 84; MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 34; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 79, 129; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 163
hierarchy of means Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168
honouring the gods, and charis Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62, 154
honouring the gods, and religious correctness Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
honouring the gods, and service to gods Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62
honouring the gods, through sacrifices Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62, 154
honouring the gods Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62, 154
hosiotes (religious correctness) Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 47
hyacinthia Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168
hymn, prose MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 34
iphigenia/iphianassa Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 70
justice, in hesiod Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 47, 49
justice Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 83, 84; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
kakotes Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 47, 49, 50
karneia Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168
katharos, paired with hagnos Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 49
knise Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
leaving the city, as a metaliterary metaphor Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 83, 84
leocrates Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 331
libations Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168; Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 47, 49
logos MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 34
logos (god the word) MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 34
lower legs Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
lucian Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 69
lucretius, gods in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 70
mekone Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
mental lexicon, mentality, change of Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 65
mesopotamia Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
metus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 70
momeuein Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 50
muses, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 83
night festival (pergamum) MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 34
nile Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
noos/nous, seat of purity/impurity, in hesiod Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 47, 49
odysseus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
olympia Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168
on sacrifices Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62
on service to gods Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62
pain/suffering de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 163
pamphylia Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
pandora Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 83
parents, and proper respect Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
parents, and religious correctness Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
parents, honour to Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
penelope Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
pergamum MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 34; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
perses Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 83, 84; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
persians Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
phoenix Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 79
piety Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
pindar Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
pleasure/happiness Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
poetic quotations Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 331
poetry, and aristocratic power Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 83, 84
porphyry Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 129
praise of spring Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 70
prayer, in hesiod Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 47, 49, 50
prayer Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168
prometheus Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
proper respect for gods, and charis Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62, 154
proper respect for gods, and good speech Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
proper respect for gods, and honouring the gods Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62, 154
proper respect for gods, and socrates Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62, 154
proper respect for gods, and sound thinking Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
proper respect for gods, rewards from Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
proper respect for gods, theopompus on Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62, 154
proper respect for gods, through festivals Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
proper respect for gods, through sacrifice Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62, 154
proper respect for gods Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
pyre deposits Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
recognizing the gods, and sacrifices Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
recognizing the gods, and socrates Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
religio/superstition Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
religion, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 70
religious correctness, and honouring the gods Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
religious correctness, and proper respect for gods Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
religious correctness, and sound thinking Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
rhetor MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 34
rhetoric, handbook MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 34
rhetoric Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
river-crossing (ritualized) Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 47, 49, 50
river as divinity Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 50
rome/roman Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30
rural dionysia Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 79
sacrifice, animal, in hesiod Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 47, 50
sacrifice Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 30; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
sacrifices, and charis Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62, 154
sacrifices, and justice Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62
sacrifices, and socrates Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62, 154
sacrifices, criticisms of Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62
sacrifices, expensive Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62
sacrifices, hesiod on Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
sacrifices, private Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
sacrifices Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62
sanctuaries Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168
service to gods'" '3.0_49.0@enages, allusion to in hesiod Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62
sex, in hesiod as unjust deed Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 47
sicyon Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 69
smoke Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
solon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 331
sparta Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168
spitting, gods spit out prayers Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 49
stealing, unjust deed in hesiod Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 47
storms Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 70
strepsiades Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 129
supplication, disrespect of, as unjust deed in hesiod Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 47
tail Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
tarsus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
theopompus, and clearchus Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
theopompus, and festivals Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 154
theopompus, and proper respect for gods Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62, 154
theopompus, and sacrifice Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62
theopompus, on expensive offerings Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62
theopompus Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
thesmophoria Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 168
thessaly Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
thighbones Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
thysia-sacrifice Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
tigris Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
timeliness Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 84
tragedy Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 331
utopia Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 83, 84
virgil, and hesiod Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 70
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 70
water Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 60
wealth, and dedications Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62
wealth, and honouring the gods Mikalson, Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy (2010) 62
zeus, justice and - Peels, Hosios: A Semantic Study of Greek Piety (2016) 65
zeus, temple of z. asclepius MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 34
zeus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 83; Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 47; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 133
zooarchaeology' Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
δίκη Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 133