Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6474
Hesiod, Theogony, 969


Δημήτηρ μὲν Πλοῦτον ἐγείνατο, δῖα θεάωνSo that no other god should ever hold sway


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Hesiod, Fragments, 151 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Hesiod, Works And Days, 49, 48 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

48. One’s rudder packed away, live lazily
3. Hesiod, Theogony, 1001-1022, 126-127, 129, 131-133, 139, 166, 168, 172, 180-181, 217, 233, 309, 313, 334, 340, 368, 385, 406, 457, 460, 468, 47, 509, 643, 729-814, 838, 886-968, 970-1000 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1000. The loveliest tots in the whole company
4. Homer, Iliad, 2.820, 5.247, 5.313, 7.478, 14.313-14.325, 20.208 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.820. /even Aeneas, whom fair Aphrodite conceived to Anchises amid the spurs of Ida, a goddess couched with a mortal man. Not alone was he; with him were Antenor's two sons, Archelochus and Acamas, well skilled in all manner of fighting.And they that dwelt in Zeleia beneath the nethermost foot of Ida 5.247. /endued with measureless strength. The one is well skilled with the bow, even Pandarus, and moreover avoweth him to be the son of Lycaon; while Aeneas avoweth himself to be born of peerless Anchises, and his mother is Aphrodite. Nay, come, let us give ground on the car, neither rage thou thus 5.313. /upon the earth; and dark night enfolded his eyes.And now would the king of men, Aeneas, have perished, had not the daughter of Zeus, Aphrodite, been quick to mark, even his mother, that conceived him to Anchises as he tended his kine. About her dear son she flung her white arms 7.478. /and some for slaves; and they made them a rich feast. So the whole night through the long-haired Achaeans feasted, and the Trojans likewise in the city, and their allies; and all night long Zeus, the counsellor, devised them evil, thundering in terrible wise. Then pale fear gat hold of them 14.313. /lest haply thou mightest wax wroth with me hereafter, if without a word I depart to the house of deep-flowing Oceanus. 14.314. /lest haply thou mightest wax wroth with me hereafter, if without a word I depart to the house of deep-flowing Oceanus. Then in answer spake to her Zeus, the cloud-gatherer.Hera, thither mayest thou go even hereafter. But for us twain, come, let us take our joy couched together in love; 14.315. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.316. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.317. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.318. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.319. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.320. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.321. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.322. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.323. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.324. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.325. /and Semele bare Dionysus, the joy of mortals; nor of Demeter, the fair-tressed queen; nor of glorious Leto; nay, nor yet of thine own self, as now I love thee, and sweet desire layeth hold of me. Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him: 20.208. /but with sight of eyes hast thou never seen my parents nor I thine. Men say that thou art son of peerless Peleus, and that thy mother was fair-tressed Thetis, a daughter of the sea; but for me, I declare thiat I am son of great-hearted Anchises, and my mother is Aphrodite.
5. Homer, Odyssey, 3.261, 5.35, 5.116-5.128, 8.279, 12.63, 12.65, 14.243, 20.201-20.203, 24.199, 24.444, 24.518 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6. Homeric Hymns, To Aphrodite, 101-290, 45-100 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

100. Or in streams’ springs or grassy meadows? I
7. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 30-46, 29 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

29. Shall I sing of how Leto gave you birth
8. Parmenides, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 8.25.4-8.25.5, 8.42.3-8.42.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8.25.4. After Thelpusa the Ladon descends to the sanctuary of Demeter in Onceium . The Thelpusians call the goddess Fury, and with them agrees Antimachus also, who wrote a poem about the expedition of the Argives against Thebes . His verse runs thus:— There, they say, is the seat of Demeter Fury. Antimachus, unknown location. Now Oncius was, according to tradition, a son of Apollo, and held sway in Thelpusian territory around the place Oncium; the goddess has the surname Fury for the following reason. 8.25.5. When Demeter was wandering in search of her daughter, she was followed, it is said, by Poseidon, who lusted after her. So she turned, the story runs, into a mare, and grazed with the mares of Oncius; realizing that he was outwitted, Poseidon too changed into a stallion and enjoyed Demeter. 8.42.3. until Pan, they say, visited Arcadia . Roaming from mountain to mountain as he hunted, he came at last to Mount Elaius and spied Demeter, the state she was in and the clothes she wore. So Zeus learnt this from Pan, and sent the Fates to Demeter, who listened to the Fates and laid aside her wrath, moderating her grief as well. For these reasons, the Phigalians say, they concluded that this cavern was sacred to Demeter and set up in it a wooden image. 8.42.4. The image, they say, was made after this fashion. It was seated on a rock, like to a woman in all respects save the head. She had the head and hair of a horse, and there grew out of her head images of serpents and other beasts. Her tunic reached right to her feet; on one of her hands was a dolphin, on the other a dove. Now why they had the image made after this fashion is plain to any intelligent man who is learned in traditions. They say that they named her Black because the goddess had black apparel. 8.42.5. They cannot relate either who made this wooden image or how it caught fire. But the old image was destroyed, and the Phigalians gave the goddess no fresh image, while they neglected for the most part her festivals and sacrifices, until the barrenness fell on the land. Then they went as suppliants to the Pythian priestess and received this response:— 8.42.6. Azanian Arcadians, acorn-eaters, who dwell In Phigaleia, the cave that hid Deo, who bare a horse, You have come to learn a cure for grievous famine, Who alone have twice been nomads, alone have twice lived on wild fruits. It was Deo who made you cease from pasturing, Deo who made you pasture again After being binders of corn and eaters With the reading ἀναστοφάγους “made you pasture again, and to be non-eaters of cakes, after being binders of corn.” of cakes, Because she was deprived of privileges and ancient honors given by men of former times. And soon will she make you eat each other and feed on your children, Unless you appease her anger with libations offered by all your people, And adorn with divine honors the nook of the cave. 8.42.7. When the Phigalians heard the oracle that was brought back, they held Demeter in greater honor than before, and particularly they persuaded Onatas of Aegina, son of Micon, to make them an image of Demeter at a price. The Pergamenes have a bronze Apollo made by this Onatas, a most wonderful marvel both for its size and workmanship. This man then, about two generations after the Persian invasion of Greece, made the Phigalians an image of bronze, guided partly by a picture or copy of the ancient wooden image which he discovered, but mostly (so goes the story) by a vision that he saw in dreams. As to the date, I have the following evidence to produce.
10. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 17-18, 16



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
anger Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 4
aphrodite Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 148; Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 261
approximation to the divine (in homeric and hesiodic poetry)' Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 261
aselgeia Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 4
asotia Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 4
birth of zeus Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 46
capital sins Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 4
catalogue Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 112
catalogue of women (hesiod) Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 219
cosmogony Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
cosmos, cosmogony, cosmography Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 218, 219, 220
cronus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
derveni poet Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
dionysus Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 261
divine appellations/attributes\n, (and) order Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 219
earth Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
enūma eliš Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 218, 219, 220
epic of etana Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 220
epic of gilgameš/gilgamesh Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 218
epos Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 46
father, fatherhood Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 46
fertility (cults) Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 148
fertility (of soil) Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 4
fornicatio Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 4
gaia Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
genealogy Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 218, 219, 220
geography Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 220
gods, births of the gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
gods, lists of Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 218, 219, 220
gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
hesiod Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59; Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 218, 219, 220
historiography Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 218, 220
homer Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 219
hymn to zeus (orphic) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
hymns Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 220
lagneia Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 4
metaphor, metaphorical language Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 148
metis Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
myth(ological), mythology Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 148
narration Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 218, 219, 220
oceanus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
parmenides, and becoming like god Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 261
parmenides, the proem Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 261
phaeacians Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 46
ploutos Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 4
pontus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
prodigality Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 4
protogonos (orphic god) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
real world\n, (of) divine appellations/attributes Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 218, 219, 220
real world\n, (of) names Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 218
rhea Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
selene Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
stoicism Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 4
swallowing, zeus swallowing of metis Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
swallowing, zeus swallowing of protogonos Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
tartarus Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 112
tethys Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
themis Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 112
travelogue Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 220
tryphe Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 4
uranus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59
weakening Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 4
wedding Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 148
zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59; Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 148; Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 261
zeus mind Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 59