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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6474
Hesiod, Theogony, 77-79


Κλειώ τʼ Εὐτέρπη τε Θάλειά τε Μελπομέενη τεTheir heavenly song. The black earth echoed round


Τερψιχόρη τʼ Ἐρατώ τε Πολύμνιά τʼ Οὐρανίη τεAnd underneath their feet a lovely sound


Καλλιόπη θʼ· ἣ δὲ προφερεστάτη ἐστὶν ἁπασέων.Rose up. They to their father made their way


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 10-19, 2, 20-26, 3-5, 57-58, 6-8, 80-85, 9, 1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1. Pierian Muses, with your songs of praise
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 10, 100-109, 11, 110-115, 12-13, 134-138, 14, 143-145, 15-18, 188-189, 19, 190-199, 2, 20, 200-209, 21, 210, 22-28, 280-283, 29, 3, 30-33, 337-339, 34, 340-349, 35, 350-359, 36, 360-361, 37-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50, 507-509, 51, 510-519, 52, 520-529, 53, 530-539, 54, 540-549, 55, 550-559, 56, 560-569, 57, 570-579, 58, 580-589, 59, 590-599, 6, 60, 600, 61-69, 7, 70-76, 78-79, 8, 80-88, 880-889, 89, 890-899, 9, 90, 900, 91-99, 1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1. From the Heliconian Muses let me sing:
3. Homer, Iliad, 1.1, 2.484-2.492, 14.242-14.262, 14.508, 15.14-15.33, 15.184-15.200, 18.43 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.1. /The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment 2.484. /Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— 2.485. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.486. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.487. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.488. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.489. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.490. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.491. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.492. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 14.242. /the god of the two strong arms, shall fashion thee with skill, and beneath it shall he set a foot-stool for the feet, whereon thou mayest rest thy shining feet when thou quaffest thy wine. 14.243. /the god of the two strong arms, shall fashion thee with skill, and beneath it shall he set a foot-stool for the feet, whereon thou mayest rest thy shining feet when thou quaffest thy wine. 14.244. /the god of the two strong arms, shall fashion thee with skill, and beneath it shall he set a foot-stool for the feet, whereon thou mayest rest thy shining feet when thou quaffest thy wine. Then sweet Sleep made answer to her, saying:Hera, queenly goddess, daughter of great Cronos, another of the gods, that are for ever, might I lightly lull to sleep, aye, were it even the streams of the river 14.245. /Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson 14.246. /Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson 14.247. /Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson 14.248. /Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson 14.249. /Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson 14.250. /on the day when the glorious son of Zeus, high of heart, sailed forth from Ilios, when he had laid waste the city of the Trojans. I, verily, beguiled the mind of Zeus, that beareth the aegis, being shed in sweetness round about him, and thou didst devise evil in thy heart against his son, when thou hadst roused the blasts of cruel winds over the face of the deep, and thereafter didst bear him away unto well-peopled Cos, far from all his kinsfolk. But Zeus, when he awakened, was wroth, and flung the gods hither and thither about his palace, and me above all he sought, and would have hurled me from heaven into the deep to be no more seen, had Night not saved me—Night that bends to her sway both gods and men. 14.251. /on the day when the glorious son of Zeus, high of heart, sailed forth from Ilios, when he had laid waste the city of the Trojans. I, verily, beguiled the mind of Zeus, that beareth the aegis, being shed in sweetness round about him, and thou didst devise evil in thy heart against his son, when thou hadst roused the blasts of cruel winds over the face of the deep, and thereafter didst bear him away unto well-peopled Cos, far from all his kinsfolk. But Zeus, when he awakened, was wroth, and flung the gods hither and thither about his palace, and me above all he sought, and would have hurled me from heaven into the deep to be no more seen, had Night not saved me—Night that bends to her sway both gods and men. 14.252. /on the day when the glorious son of Zeus, high of heart, sailed forth from Ilios, when he had laid waste the city of the Trojans. I, verily, beguiled the mind of Zeus, that beareth the aegis, being shed in sweetness round about him, and thou didst devise evil in thy heart against his son, when thou hadst roused the blasts of cruel winds over the face of the deep, and thereafter didst bear him away unto well-peopled Cos, far from all his kinsfolk. But Zeus, when he awakened, was wroth, and flung the gods hither and thither about his palace, and me above all he sought, and would have hurled me from heaven into the deep to be no more seen, had Night not saved me—Night that bends to her sway both gods and men. 14.253. /on the day when the glorious son of Zeus, high of heart, sailed forth from Ilios, when he had laid waste the city of the Trojans. I, verily, beguiled the mind of Zeus, that beareth the aegis, being shed in sweetness round about him, and thou didst devise evil in thy heart against his son, when thou hadst roused the blasts of cruel winds over the face of the deep, and thereafter didst bear him away unto well-peopled Cos, far from all his kinsfolk. But Zeus, when he awakened, was wroth, and flung the gods hither and thither about his palace, and me above all he sought, and would have hurled me from heaven into the deep to be no more seen, had Night not saved me—Night that bends to her sway both gods and men. 14.254. /on the day when the glorious son of Zeus, high of heart, sailed forth from Ilios, when he had laid waste the city of the Trojans. I, verily, beguiled the mind of Zeus, that beareth the aegis, being shed in sweetness round about him, and thou didst devise evil in thy heart against his son, when thou hadst roused the blasts of cruel winds over the face of the deep, and thereafter didst bear him away unto well-peopled Cos, far from all his kinsfolk. But Zeus, when he awakened, was wroth, and flung the gods hither and thither about his palace, and me above all he sought, and would have hurled me from heaven into the deep to be no more seen, had Night not saved me—Night that bends to her sway both gods and men. 14.260. /To her I came in my flight, and besought her, and Zeus refrained him, albeit he was wroth, for he had awe lest he do aught displeasing to swift Night. And now again thou biddest me fulfill this other task, that may nowise be done. To him then spake again ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Sleep, wherefore ponderest thou of these things in thine heart? 14.261. /To her I came in my flight, and besought her, and Zeus refrained him, albeit he was wroth, for he had awe lest he do aught displeasing to swift Night. And now again thou biddest me fulfill this other task, that may nowise be done. To him then spake again ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Sleep, wherefore ponderest thou of these things in thine heart? 14.262. /To her I came in my flight, and besought her, and Zeus refrained him, albeit he was wroth, for he had awe lest he do aught displeasing to swift Night. And now again thou biddest me fulfill this other task, that may nowise be done. To him then spake again ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Sleep, wherefore ponderest thou of these things in thine heart? 15.14. /and he was gasping with painful breath, distraught in mind, and vomiting blood; for not the weakest of the Achaeans was it that had smitten him. At sight of him the father of men and gods had pity, and with a dread glance from beneath his brows he spake to Hera, saying:Hera, that art hard to deal with, it is the craft of thine evil wiles 15.15. /that hath stayed goodly Hector from the fight, and hath driven the host in rout. Verily I know not but thou shalt yet be the first to reap the fruits of thy wretched ill-contriving, and I shall scourge thee with stripes. Dost thou not remember when thou wast hung from on high, and from thy feet I suspended two anvils, and about thy wrists cast 15.16. /that hath stayed goodly Hector from the fight, and hath driven the host in rout. Verily I know not but thou shalt yet be the first to reap the fruits of thy wretched ill-contriving, and I shall scourge thee with stripes. Dost thou not remember when thou wast hung from on high, and from thy feet I suspended two anvils, and about thy wrists cast 15.17. /that hath stayed goodly Hector from the fight, and hath driven the host in rout. Verily I know not but thou shalt yet be the first to reap the fruits of thy wretched ill-contriving, and I shall scourge thee with stripes. Dost thou not remember when thou wast hung from on high, and from thy feet I suspended two anvils, and about thy wrists cast 15.18. /that hath stayed goodly Hector from the fight, and hath driven the host in rout. Verily I know not but thou shalt yet be the first to reap the fruits of thy wretched ill-contriving, and I shall scourge thee with stripes. Dost thou not remember when thou wast hung from on high, and from thy feet I suspended two anvils, and about thy wrists cast 15.19. /that hath stayed goodly Hector from the fight, and hath driven the host in rout. Verily I know not but thou shalt yet be the first to reap the fruits of thy wretched ill-contriving, and I shall scourge thee with stripes. Dost thou not remember when thou wast hung from on high, and from thy feet I suspended two anvils, and about thy wrists cast 15.20. /a band of gold that might not be broken? And in the air amid the clouds thou didst hang, and the gods had indignation throughout high Olympus; howbeit they availed not to draw nigh and loose thee. Nay, whomsoever I caught, I would seize and hurl from the threshold until he reached the earth, his strength all spent. Yet not even so was my heart 15.21. /a band of gold that might not be broken? And in the air amid the clouds thou didst hang, and the gods had indignation throughout high Olympus; howbeit they availed not to draw nigh and loose thee. Nay, whomsoever I caught, I would seize and hurl from the threshold until he reached the earth, his strength all spent. Yet not even so was my heart 15.22. /a band of gold that might not be broken? And in the air amid the clouds thou didst hang, and the gods had indignation throughout high Olympus; howbeit they availed not to draw nigh and loose thee. Nay, whomsoever I caught, I would seize and hurl from the threshold until he reached the earth, his strength all spent. Yet not even so was my heart 15.23. /a band of gold that might not be broken? And in the air amid the clouds thou didst hang, and the gods had indignation throughout high Olympus; howbeit they availed not to draw nigh and loose thee. Nay, whomsoever I caught, I would seize and hurl from the threshold until he reached the earth, his strength all spent. Yet not even so was my heart 15.24. /a band of gold that might not be broken? And in the air amid the clouds thou didst hang, and the gods had indignation throughout high Olympus; howbeit they availed not to draw nigh and loose thee. Nay, whomsoever I caught, I would seize and hurl from the threshold until he reached the earth, his strength all spent. Yet not even so was my heart 15.25. /eased of its ceaseless pain for godlike Heracles, whom thou when thou hadst leagued thee with the North Wind and suborned his blasts, didst send over the unresting sea, by thine evil devising, and thereafter didst bear him away unto well-peopled Cos. Him did I save from thence, and brought again 15.26. /eased of its ceaseless pain for godlike Heracles, whom thou when thou hadst leagued thee with the North Wind and suborned his blasts, didst send over the unresting sea, by thine evil devising, and thereafter didst bear him away unto well-peopled Cos. Him did I save from thence, and brought again 15.27. /eased of its ceaseless pain for godlike Heracles, whom thou when thou hadst leagued thee with the North Wind and suborned his blasts, didst send over the unresting sea, by thine evil devising, and thereafter didst bear him away unto well-peopled Cos. Him did I save from thence, and brought again 15.28. /eased of its ceaseless pain for godlike Heracles, whom thou when thou hadst leagued thee with the North Wind and suborned his blasts, didst send over the unresting sea, by thine evil devising, and thereafter didst bear him away unto well-peopled Cos. Him did I save from thence, and brought again 15.29. /eased of its ceaseless pain for godlike Heracles, whom thou when thou hadst leagued thee with the North Wind and suborned his blasts, didst send over the unresting sea, by thine evil devising, and thereafter didst bear him away unto well-peopled Cos. Him did I save from thence, and brought again 15.30. /to horse-pasturing Argos, albeit after he had laboured sore. of these things will I mind thee yet again, that thou mayest cease from thy beguilings, to the end that thou mayest see whether they anywise avail thee, the dalliance and the couch, wherein thou didst lie with me when thou hadst come forth from among the gods, and didst beguile me. 15.31. /to horse-pasturing Argos, albeit after he had laboured sore. of these things will I mind thee yet again, that thou mayest cease from thy beguilings, to the end that thou mayest see whether they anywise avail thee, the dalliance and the couch, wherein thou didst lie with me when thou hadst come forth from among the gods, and didst beguile me. 15.32. /to horse-pasturing Argos, albeit after he had laboured sore. of these things will I mind thee yet again, that thou mayest cease from thy beguilings, to the end that thou mayest see whether they anywise avail thee, the dalliance and the couch, wherein thou didst lie with me when thou hadst come forth from among the gods, and didst beguile me. 15.33. /to horse-pasturing Argos, albeit after he had laboured sore. of these things will I mind thee yet again, that thou mayest cease from thy beguilings, to the end that thou mayest see whether they anywise avail thee, the dalliance and the couch, wherein thou didst lie with me when thou hadst come forth from among the gods, and didst beguile me. 15.184. /and he biddeth thee avoid thee out of his hands; for he avoweth him to be better far than thou in might, and the elder born. Yet thy heart counteth it but a little thing to declare thyself the peer of him, of whom even the other gods are adread. Then, stirred to hot anger, the glorious Shaker of Earth spake unto her: 15.185. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.186. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.187. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.188. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.189. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.190. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.191. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.192. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.193. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.194. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.195. /let him abide in his third portion, how strong soever he be.And with might of hand let him not seek to affright me, as though I were some coward. His daughters and his sons were it better for him to threaten with blustering words, even them that himself begat, who perforce will hearken to whatsoever he may bid. 15.196. /let him abide in his third portion, how strong soever he be.And with might of hand let him not seek to affright me, as though I were some coward. His daughters and his sons were it better for him to threaten with blustering words, even them that himself begat, who perforce will hearken to whatsoever he may bid. 15.197. /let him abide in his third portion, how strong soever he be.And with might of hand let him not seek to affright me, as though I were some coward. His daughters and his sons were it better for him to threaten with blustering words, even them that himself begat, who perforce will hearken to whatsoever he may bid. 15.198. /let him abide in his third portion, how strong soever he be.And with might of hand let him not seek to affright me, as though I were some coward. His daughters and his sons were it better for him to threaten with blustering words, even them that himself begat, who perforce will hearken to whatsoever he may bid. 15.199. /let him abide in his third portion, how strong soever he be.And with might of hand let him not seek to affright me, as though I were some coward. His daughters and his sons were it better for him to threaten with blustering words, even them that himself begat, who perforce will hearken to whatsoever he may bid. 15.200. /Then wind-footed swift Iris answered him:Is it thus in good sooth, O Earth-Enfolder, thou dark-haired god, that I am to bear to Zeus this message, unyielding and harsh, or wilt thou anywise turn thee; for the hearts of the good may be turned? Thou knowest how the Erinyes ever follow to aid the elder-born. 18.43. /Nesaea and Speio and Thoë and ox-eyed Halië, and Cymothoë and Actaeä and Limnoreia, and Melite and Iaera and Amphithoe and Agave, Doto and Proto and Pherousa and Dynamene, and Dexamene and Amphinone and Callianeira
4. Homer, Odyssey, 1.1, 1.10 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 157-164, 156 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

156. You walked on craggy Cynthus or abroad
6. Empedocles, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

259c. that they sang and sang, forgetting food and drink, until at last unconsciously they died. From them the locust tribe afterwards arose, and they have this gift from the Muses, that from the time of their birth they need no sustece, but sing continually, without food or drink, until they die, when they go to the Muses and report who honors each of them on earth. They tell Terpsichore of those who have honored her in dances, and make them dearer to her;
8. Aratus Solensis, Phaenomena, 109-114, 125-136, 108 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

108. οὔπω λευγαλέου τότε νείκεος ἠπίσταντο
9. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 3.1-3.5 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3.1. εἰ δʼ ἄγε νῦν, Ἐρατώ, παρά θʼ ἵστασο, καί μοι ἔνισπε
10. Anon., Sibylline Oracles, 3.97-3.104, 3.110-3.155 (1st cent. BCE - 5th cent. CE)

3.97. Then all the elements shall be bereft 3.98. of order, when the God who dwells on high 3.99. Shall roll the heaven, even as a scroll is rolled; 3.100. 100 And to the mighty earth and sea shall fall 3.101. The entire multiform sky; and there shall flow 3.102. A tireless cataract of raging fire 3.103. And it shall burn the land, and burn the sea 3.104. And heavenly sky, and night, and day, and melt 3.110. 110 The judgment midway in a mighty age 3.111. Shall come, when all these things shall come to pass. 3.112. O navigable waters and each land 3.113. of the Orient and of the Occident 3.114. Subject shall all things be to him who come 3.115. 115 Into the world again, and therefore he 3.116. Himself became first conscious of his power. 3.117. But when the threatenings of the mighty God 3.118. Are fulfilled, which he threatened mortals once 3.119. When in Assyrian land they built a tower;– 3.120. 120 (And they all spoke one language, and resolved 3.121. To mount aloft into the starry heaven; 3.122. But on the air the Immortal straightway put 3.123. A mighty force; and then winds from above 3.124. Cast down the great tower and stirred mortals up 3.125. 125 To wrangling with each other; therefore men 3.126. Gave to that city the name of Babylon);– 3.127. Now when the tower fell and the tongues of men 3.128. Turned to all sorts of sounds, straightway all earth 3.129. Was filled with men and kingdoms were divided; 3.130. 130 And then the generation tenth appeared 3.131. of mortal men, from the time when the flood 3.132. Came upon earlier men. And Cronos reigned 3.133. And Titan and Iapetus; and men called them 3.134. Best offspring of Gaia and of Uranus 3.135. 135 Giving to them names both of earth and heaven 3.136. Since they were very first of mortal men. 3.137. So there were three divisions of the earth 3.138. According to the allotment of each man 3.139. And each one having his own portion reigned 3.140. 140 And fought not; for a father's oaths were there 3.141. And equal were their portions. But the time 3.142. Complete of old age on the father came 3.143. And he died; and the sons infringing oath 3.144. Stirred up against each other bitter strife 3.145. 145 Which one should have the royal rank and rule 3.146. Over all mortals; and against each other 3.147. Cronos and Titan fought. But Rhea and Gaia 3.148. And Aphrodite fond of crowns, Demeter 3.149. And Hestia and Dione of fair lock 3.150. 150 Brought them to friendship, and together called 3.151. All who were kings, both brothers and near kin 3.152. And others of the same ancestral blood 3.153. And they judged Cronos should reign king of all 3.154. For he was oldest and of noblest form. 3.155. 155 But Titan laid on Cronos mighty oath
11. Vergil, Aeneis, 5.592-5.593, 5.630, 7.1, 7.37-7.45, 9.525-9.527 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.592. rushed fiercer to the fight, his strength now roused 5.593. by rage, while shame and courage confident 5.630. Forthwith Aeneas summons all who will 7.1. One more immortal name thy death bequeathed 7.37. Then, gazing from the deep, Aeneas saw 7.38. a stretch of groves, whence Tiber 's smiling stream 7.39. its tumbling current rich with yellow sands 7.40. burst seaward forth: around it and above 7.41. hore-haunting birds of varied voice and plume 7.42. flattered the sky with song, and, circling far 7.43. o'er river-bed and grove, took joyful wing. 7.44. Thither to landward now his ships he steered 9.526. was all of tangled brush and blinding shade
12. Bacchylides, Odes, 5.13-5.14, 5.177



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aetia, books 1 and 2, muses in Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 334, 336
aetiology, callimachus and Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 334
aphrodite Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
apollo (god), depiction/imagery of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
apollo (god), sanctuary at delos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
apollonius rhodius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 135
apotheosis de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 331
archelaus, homer Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 336
argentarius, m. Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
arma Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
belief, visual imagery as evidence Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
bios/βίος Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
callimachus, and aetiology Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 334
callimachus, and the muses Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 334, 336
callimachus, dialogue with muses Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 334, 336
calliope Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 336; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127, 135
catalogue Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 277
catalogue of ships (homer, iliad Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 208
clio Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 334, 336
commentary Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
cosmos/kosmos Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
cronus Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 277
dance Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
delos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
dike de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 331
dikê/δίκη Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
earth/earth/gaea Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
epic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127, 135
epic catalogues, (of the) muses Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 208
epos Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 48
erato Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127, 128, 135
eris/eris/strife/strife Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
essence Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
etymology Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 128, 135
eurydice de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 331
father, fatherhood Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 48
gods, lists of Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 208
gods and goddesses, depiction/imagery of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
graces, genealogy of Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 334
graces Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 334
hades, place de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 331
harder, annette Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 334
harmony Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
helicon Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
hellenistic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 128
heracles Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 128; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 331
heroes de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 331
hesiod, the muses address' Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 73
hesiod, theogony Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
hesiod, works and days Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
hesiod Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 128, 135; Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 208
homer, iliad Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 208
homer, muses in Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 334, 336
homer, odyssey Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 208
homer Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 135; Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 208
humanism Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 135
hymn to the muses, theogony Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 334, 336
iapetus Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 172
inachus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 331
justice de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 331
latium Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
leto (goddess) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
love/philotês (in empedocles) Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 277
memory, social function of Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 128
muses, callimachus and Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 334, 336
muses, calliope de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 331
muses, iconography of Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 336
muses, naming of Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 334
muses, traditional division of Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 336
muses Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127, 128, 135; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 331
myth/mythology, transmission Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
mythic past Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 128
narrator, narratorial role Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 128
noah Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 172
numbers Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 208
ocean/oceanus Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 277
olympus Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 128
opposites (pair of) Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
orpheus, musician de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 331
orpheus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 331
pandora Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
patrizi, francesco Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 135
phaedrus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 336
plato Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 128, 135
poetic language, religious role of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
poetry/poetic performance, homeric hymn to apollo Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
real world\n, (of) names Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 208
socrates Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 128
song Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 331
songs and music, construction of authority Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
songs and music, hymns Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
songs and music Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
styx Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 277
thetis Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 128
thrace de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 331
titans Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241, 277
turnus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 135
vergil, aeneid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127, 135
versnel, hendrik s. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
war, trojan Mawford and Ntanou, Ancient Memory: Remembrance and Commemoration in Graeco-Roman Literature (2021) 128
winds de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 331
zeus Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 172; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 128