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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6474
Hesiod, Theogony, 574-584


ἀργυφέη ἐσθῆτι· κατὰ κρῆθεν δὲ καλύπτρηνA torment from the very first, for he


δαιδαλέην χείρεσσι κατέσχεθε, θαῦμα ἰδέσθαι·Married the maid whom Zeus had formed. But Zeu


ἀμφὶ δέ οἱ στεφάνους, νεοθηλέος ἄνθεα ποίηςAt villainous Menoetius let loose


ἱμερτοὺς περίθηκε καρήατι Παλλὰς Ἀθήνη.His lurid bolt because his vanity


ἀμφὶ δέ οἱ στεφάνην χρυσέην κεφαλῆφιν ἔθηκεAnd strength had gone beyond the boundary


τὴν αὐτὸς ποίησε περικλυτὸς ἈμφιγυήειςOf moderation: down to Erebu


ἀσκήσας παλάμῃσι, χαριζόμενος Διὶ πατρί.He went headlong. Atlas was tirele


τῇ δʼ ἐνὶ δαίδαλα πολλὰ τετεύχατο, θαῦμα ἰδέσθαιIn holding up wide Heaven, forced to stand


κνώδαλʼ, ὅσʼ ἤπειρος πολλὰ τρέφει ἠδὲ θάλασσαUpon the borders of this earthly land


τῶν ὅ γε πόλλʼ ἐνέθηκε,—χάρις δʼ ἀπελάμπετο πολλή,—Before the clear-voiced daughters of the West


θαυμάσια, ζῴοισιν ἐοικότα φωνήεσσιν.A task assigned at wise Zeus’s behest.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

27 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 2.7 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2.7. וַיִּיצֶר יְהוָה אֱלֹהִים אֶת־הָאָדָם עָפָר מִן־הָאֲדָמָה וַיִּפַּח בְּאַפָּיו נִשְׁמַת חַיִּים וַיְהִי הָאָדָם לְנֶפֶשׁ חַיָּה׃ 2.7. Then the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul."
2. Hesiod, Works And Days, 101-105, 110, 128, 376, 42-49, 5, 50-59, 6, 60-69, 7, 70-75, 755-757, 76-100 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

100. Which brought the Death-Gods. Now in misery
3. Hesiod, Theogony, 101-108, 135, 175, 221-222, 233-236, 26, 262, 27-28, 383-403, 42, 429, 43-44, 442-447, 45-49, 494, 498-499, 50, 500, 507-509, 51, 510-519, 52, 520-539, 54, 540-549, 55, 550-573, 575-599, 60, 600-616, 66-67, 70-74, 76, 78-88, 886-889, 89, 890-899, 90, 900-909, 91, 910-919, 92, 920-929, 93, 930-939, 94, 940-949, 95-100 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

100. Employing gentle words persuasively
4. Homer, Iliad, 14.211-14.213, 14.276-14.291, 18.417-18.420 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

14.211. /ever should I be called dear by them and worthy of reverence. To her again spake in answer laughter-loving Aphrodite:It may not be that I should say thee nay, nor were it seemly; for thou sleepest in the arms of mightiest Zeus. She spake, and loosed from her bosom the broidered zone 14.212. /ever should I be called dear by them and worthy of reverence. To her again spake in answer laughter-loving Aphrodite:It may not be that I should say thee nay, nor were it seemly; for thou sleepest in the arms of mightiest Zeus. She spake, and loosed from her bosom the broidered zone 14.213. /ever should I be called dear by them and worthy of reverence. To her again spake in answer laughter-loving Aphrodite:It may not be that I should say thee nay, nor were it seemly; for thou sleepest in the arms of mightiest Zeus. She spake, and loosed from her bosom the broidered zone 14.276. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.277. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.278. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.279. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.280. /But when she had sworn and made an end of the oath, the twain left the cities of Lemnos and Imbros, and clothed about in mist went forth, speeding swiftly on their way. To many-fountained Ida they came, the mother of wild creatures, even to Lectum, where first they left the sea; and the twain fared on over the dry land 14.281. /But when she had sworn and made an end of the oath, the twain left the cities of Lemnos and Imbros, and clothed about in mist went forth, speeding swiftly on their way. To many-fountained Ida they came, the mother of wild creatures, even to Lectum, where first they left the sea; and the twain fared on over the dry land 14.282. /But when she had sworn and made an end of the oath, the twain left the cities of Lemnos and Imbros, and clothed about in mist went forth, speeding swiftly on their way. To many-fountained Ida they came, the mother of wild creatures, even to Lectum, where first they left the sea; and the twain fared on over the dry land 14.283. /But when she had sworn and made an end of the oath, the twain left the cities of Lemnos and Imbros, and clothed about in mist went forth, speeding swiftly on their way. To many-fountained Ida they came, the mother of wild creatures, even to Lectum, where first they left the sea; and the twain fared on over the dry land 14.284. /But when she had sworn and made an end of the oath, the twain left the cities of Lemnos and Imbros, and clothed about in mist went forth, speeding swiftly on their way. To many-fountained Ida they came, the mother of wild creatures, even to Lectum, where first they left the sea; and the twain fared on over the dry land 14.285. /and the topmost forest quivered beneath their feet. There Sleep did halt, or ever the eyes of Zeus beheld him, and mounted up on a fir-tree exceeding tall, the highest that then grew in Ida; and it reached up through the mists into heaven. Thereon he perched, thick-hidden by the branches of the fir 14.286. /and the topmost forest quivered beneath their feet. There Sleep did halt, or ever the eyes of Zeus beheld him, and mounted up on a fir-tree exceeding tall, the highest that then grew in Ida; and it reached up through the mists into heaven. Thereon he perched, thick-hidden by the branches of the fir 14.287. /and the topmost forest quivered beneath their feet. There Sleep did halt, or ever the eyes of Zeus beheld him, and mounted up on a fir-tree exceeding tall, the highest that then grew in Ida; and it reached up through the mists into heaven. Thereon he perched, thick-hidden by the branches of the fir 14.288. /and the topmost forest quivered beneath their feet. There Sleep did halt, or ever the eyes of Zeus beheld him, and mounted up on a fir-tree exceeding tall, the highest that then grew in Ida; and it reached up through the mists into heaven. Thereon he perched, thick-hidden by the branches of the fir 14.289. /and the topmost forest quivered beneath their feet. There Sleep did halt, or ever the eyes of Zeus beheld him, and mounted up on a fir-tree exceeding tall, the highest that then grew in Ida; and it reached up through the mists into heaven. Thereon he perched, thick-hidden by the branches of the fir 14.290. /in the likeness of a clear-voiced mountain bird, that the gods call Chalcis, and men Cymindis.But Hera swiftly drew nigh to topmost Gargarus, the peak of lofty Ida, and Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, beheld her. And when he beheld her, then love encompassed his wise heart about 14.291. /in the likeness of a clear-voiced mountain bird, that the gods call Chalcis, and men Cymindis.But Hera swiftly drew nigh to topmost Gargarus, the peak of lofty Ida, and Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, beheld her. And when he beheld her, then love encompassed his wise heart about 18.417. /and his mighty neck and shaggy breast, and put upon him a tunic, and grasped a stout staff, and went forth halting; but there moved swiftly to support their lord handmaidens wrought of gold in the semblance of living maids. In them is understanding in their hearts, and in them speech 18.418. /and his mighty neck and shaggy breast, and put upon him a tunic, and grasped a stout staff, and went forth halting; but there moved swiftly to support their lord handmaidens wrought of gold in the semblance of living maids. In them is understanding in their hearts, and in them speech 18.419. /and his mighty neck and shaggy breast, and put upon him a tunic, and grasped a stout staff, and went forth halting; but there moved swiftly to support their lord handmaidens wrought of gold in the semblance of living maids. In them is understanding in their hearts, and in them speech 18.420. /and strength, and they know cunning handiwork by gift of the immortal gods. These busily moved to support their lord, and he, limping nigh to where Thetis was, sat him down upon a shining chair; and he clasped her by the hand, and spake, and addressed her:Wherefore, long-robed Thetis, art thou come to our house
5. Homer, Odyssey, 7.63-7.68, 7.311-7.315 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6. Sappho, Fragments, 94 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

7. Sappho, Fragments, 94 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

8. Sappho, Fragments, 94 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

9. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 562-886, 561 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

561. τίς γῆ; τί γένος; τίνα φῶ λεύσσειν 561. What land is this? What people? By what name am I to call the one I see exposed to the tempest in bonds of rock? What offence have you committed that as punishment you are doomed to destruction?
10. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 562, 574, 587-588, 561 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

561. πυκνοῦ κροτησμοῦ τυγχάνουσʼ ὑπὸ πτόλιν.
11. Theocritus, Idylls, 11 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

12. Anon., Sibylline Oracles, 3.97-3.104, 3.110-3.155 (1st cent. BCE - 5th cent. CE)

3.97. Then all the elements shall be bereft 3.98. of order, when the God who dwells on high 3.99. Shall roll the heaven, even as a scroll is rolled; 3.100. 100 And to the mighty earth and sea shall fall 3.101. The entire multiform sky; and there shall flow 3.102. A tireless cataract of raging fire 3.103. And it shall burn the land, and burn the sea 3.104. And heavenly sky, and night, and day, and melt 3.110. 110 The judgment midway in a mighty age 3.111. Shall come, when all these things shall come to pass. 3.112. O navigable waters and each land 3.113. of the Orient and of the Occident 3.114. Subject shall all things be to him who come 3.115. 115 Into the world again, and therefore he 3.116. Himself became first conscious of his power. 3.117. But when the threatenings of the mighty God 3.118. Are fulfilled, which he threatened mortals once 3.119. When in Assyrian land they built a tower;– 3.120. 120 (And they all spoke one language, and resolved 3.121. To mount aloft into the starry heaven; 3.122. But on the air the Immortal straightway put 3.123. A mighty force; and then winds from above 3.124. Cast down the great tower and stirred mortals up 3.125. 125 To wrangling with each other; therefore men 3.126. Gave to that city the name of Babylon);– 3.127. Now when the tower fell and the tongues of men 3.128. Turned to all sorts of sounds, straightway all earth 3.129. Was filled with men and kingdoms were divided; 3.130. 130 And then the generation tenth appeared 3.131. of mortal men, from the time when the flood 3.132. Came upon earlier men. And Cronos reigned 3.133. And Titan and Iapetus; and men called them 3.134. Best offspring of Gaia and of Uranus 3.135. 135 Giving to them names both of earth and heaven 3.136. Since they were very first of mortal men. 3.137. So there were three divisions of the earth 3.138. According to the allotment of each man 3.139. And each one having his own portion reigned 3.140. 140 And fought not; for a father's oaths were there 3.141. And equal were their portions. But the time 3.142. Complete of old age on the father came 3.143. And he died; and the sons infringing oath 3.144. Stirred up against each other bitter strife 3.145. 145 Which one should have the royal rank and rule 3.146. Over all mortals; and against each other 3.147. Cronos and Titan fought. But Rhea and Gaia 3.148. And Aphrodite fond of crowns, Demeter 3.149. And Hestia and Dione of fair lock 3.150. 150 Brought them to friendship, and together called 3.151. All who were kings, both brothers and near kin 3.152. And others of the same ancestral blood 3.153. And they judged Cronos should reign king of all 3.154. For he was oldest and of noblest form. 3.155. 155 But Titan laid on Cronos mighty oath
13. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 10.250-10.251 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)

14. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.4.1, 3.14.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.4.1. Κάδμος δὲ ἀποθανοῦσαν θάψας Τηλέφασσαν, ὑπὸ Θρακῶν ξενισθείς, ἦλθεν εἰς Δελφοὺς περὶ τῆς Εὐρώπης πυνθανόμενος. ὁ δὲ θεὸς εἶπε περὶ μὲν Εὐρώπης μὴ πολυπραγμονεῖν, χρῆσθαι δὲ καθοδηγῷ βοΐ, καὶ πόλιν κτίζειν ἔνθα ἂν αὕτη 1 -- πέσῃ καμοῦσα. τοιοῦτον λαβὼν χρησμὸν διὰ Φωκέων ἐπορεύετο, εἶτα βοῒ συντυχὼν ἐν τοῖς Πελάγοντος βουκολίοις ταύτῃ κατόπισθεν εἵπετο. ἡ δὲ διεξιοῦσα Βοιωτίαν ἐκλίθη, πόλις ἔνθα νῦν εἰσι Θῆβαι. 2 -- βουλόμενος δὲ Ἀθηνᾷ καταθῦσαι τὴν βοῦν, πέμπει τινὰς τῶν μεθʼ ἑαυτοῦ ληψομένους 3 -- ἀπὸ τῆς Ἀρείας κρήνης ὕδωρ· φρουρῶν δὲ τὴν κρήνην δράκων, ὃν ἐξ Ἄρεος εἶπόν τινες γεγονέναι, τοὺς πλείονας τῶν πεμφθέντων διέφθειρεν. ἀγανακτήσας δὲ Κάδμος κτείνει τὸν δράκοντα, καὶ τῆς Ἀθηνᾶς ὑποθεμένης τοὺς ὀδόντας αὐτοῦ σπείρει. τούτων δὲ σπαρέντων ἀνέτειλαν ἐκ γῆς ἄνδρες ἔνοπλοι, οὓς ἐκάλεσαν Σπαρτούς. οὗτοι δὲ ἀπέκτειναν ἀλλήλους, οἱ μὲν εἰς ἔριν ἀκούσιον 4 -- ἐλθόντες, οἱ δὲ ἀγνοοῦντες. Φερεκύδης δέ φησιν ὅτι Κάδμος, ἰδὼν ἐκ γῆς ἀναφυομένους ἄνδρας ἐνόπλους, ἐπʼ αὐτοὺς ἔβαλε 1 -- λίθους, οἱ δὲ ὑπʼ ἀλλήλων νομίζοντες βάλλεσθαι εἰς μάχην κατέστησαν. περιεσώθησαν δὲ πέντε, Ἐχίων Οὐδαῖος Χθονίος Ὑπερήνωρ Πέλωρος. 2 -- 3.14.6. Κραναὸν δὲ ἐκβαλὼν Ἀμφικτύων ἐβασίλευσε· τοῦτον ἔνιοι μὲν Δευκαλίωνος, ἔνιοι δὲ αὐτόχθονα 3 -- λέγουσι. βασιλεύσαντα δὲ αὐτὸν ἔτη 4 -- δώδεκα Ἐριχθόνιος ἐκβάλλει. τοῦτον οἱ μὲν Ἡφαίστου καὶ τῆς Κραναοῦ θυγατρὸς Ἀτθίδος εἶναι λέγουσιν, οἱ δὲ Ἡφαίστου καὶ Ἀθηνᾶς, οὕτως· Ἀθηνᾶ παρεγένετο πρὸς Ἥφαιστον, ὅπλα κατασκευάσαι θέλουσα. ὁ δὲ ἐγκαταλελειμμένος 5 -- ὑπὸ Ἀφροδίτης εἰς ἐπιθυμίαν ὤλισθε τῆς Ἀθηνᾶς, καὶ διώκειν αὐτὴν ἤρξατο· ἡ δὲ ἔφευγεν. ὡς δὲ ἐγγὺς αὐτῆς ἐγένετο πολλῇ ἀνάγκῃ (ἦν γὰρ χωλός), ἐπειρᾶτο συνελθεῖν. ἡ δὲ ὡς σώφρων καὶ παρθένος οὖσα οὐκ ἠνέσχετο· ὁ δὲ ἀπεσπέρμηνεν εἰς τὸ σκέλος τῆς θεᾶς. ἐκείνη δὲ μυσαχθεῖσα ἐρίῳ ἀπομάξασα τὸν γόνον εἰς γῆν ἔρριψε. φευγούσης δὲ αὐτῆς καὶ τῆς γονῆς εἰς γῆν πεσούσης Ἐριχθόνιος γίνεται. τοῦτον Ἀθηνᾶ κρύφα τῶν ἄλλων θεῶν ἔτρεφεν, ἀθάνατον θέλουσα ποιῆσαι· καὶ καταθεῖσα αὐτὸν εἰς κίστην Πανδρόσῳ τῇ Κέκροπος παρακατέθετο, ἀπειποῦσα τὴν κίστην ἀνοίγειν. αἱ δὲ ἀδελφαὶ τῆς Πανδρόσου ἀνοίγουσιν ὑπὸ περιεργίας, καὶ θεῶνται τῷ βρέφει παρεσπειραμένον δράκοντα· καὶ ὡς μὲν ἔνιοι λέγουσιν, ὑπʼ αὐτοῦ διεφθάρησαν τοῦ δράκοντος, ὡς δὲ ἔνιοι, διʼ ὀργὴν Ἀθηνᾶς ἐμμανεῖς γενόμεναι κατὰ τῆς ἀκροπόλεως αὑτὰς ἔρριψαν. ἐν δὲ τῷ τεμένει τραφεὶς Ἐριχθόνιος ὑπʼ αὐτῆς Ἀθηνᾶς, ἐκβαλὼν Ἀμφικτύονα ἐβασίλευσεν Ἀθηνῶν, καὶ τὸ ἐν ἀκροπόλει ξόανον τῆς Ἀθηνᾶς ἱδρύσατο, καὶ τῶν Παναθηναίων τὴν ἑορτὴν συνεστήσατο, καὶ Πραξιθέαν 1 -- νηίδα νύμφην ἔγημεν, ἐξ ἧς αὐτῷ παῖς Πανδίων ἐγεννήθη.
15. New Testament, 1 Timothy, 1.11-1.14 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.11. according to the gospel of the glory of the blessed God, which was committed to my trust. 1.12. And I thank him who enabled me, Christ Jesus our Lord, because he counted me faithful, appointing me to service; 1.13. although I was before a blasphemer, a persecutor, and insolent. However, I obtained mercy, because I did it ignorantly in unbelief. 1.14. The grace of our Lord abounded exceedingly with faith and love which is in Christ Jesus.
16. Statius, Thebais, 2.273-2.276, 2.283-2.284 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.24.4-1.24.5, 2.19.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.24.4. and there are statues of Zeus, one made by Leochares See Paus. 1.1.3 . and one called Polieus (Urban), the customary mode of sacrificing to whom I will give without adding the traditional reason thereof. Upon the altar of Zeus Polieus they place barley mixed with wheat and leave it unguarded. The ox, which they keep already prepared for sacrifice, goes to the altar and partakes of the grain. One of the priests they call the ox-slayer, who kills the ox and then, casting aside the axe here according to the ritual runs away. The others bring the axe to trial, as though they know not the man who did the deed. 1.24.5. Their ritual, then, is such as I have described. As you enter the temple that they name the Parthenon, all the sculptures you see on what is called the pediment refer to the birth of Athena, those on the rear pediment represent the contest for the land between Athena and Poseidon. The statue itself is made of ivory and gold. On the middle of her helmet is placed a likeness of the Sphinx—the tale of the Sphinx I will give when I come to my description of Boeotia—and on either side of the helmet are griffins in relief. 2.19.5. Here is dedicated the throne of Danaus, and here Is placed a statue of Biton, in the form of a man carrying a bull on his shoulders. According to the poet Lyceas, when the Argives were holding a sacrifice to Zeus at Nemea, Biton by sheer physical strength took up a bull and carried it there. Next to this statue is a fire which they keep burning, calling it the fire of Phoroneus. For they do not admit that fire was given to mankind by Prometheus, but insist in assigning the discovery of fire to Phoroneus.
18. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.96 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.96 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Tertullian, On Baptism, 17.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

21. Origen, Against Celsus, 3.44, 3.59 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3.44. After these points Celsus quotes some objections against the doctrine of Jesus, made by a very few individuals who are considered Christians, not of the more intelligent, as he supposes, but of the more ignorant class, and asserts that the following are the rules laid down by them. Let no one come to us who has been instructed, or who is wise or prudent (for such qualifications are deemed evil by us); but if there be any ignorant, or unintelligent, or uninstructed, or foolish persons, let them come with confidence. By which words, acknowledging that such individuals are worthy of their God, they manifestly show that they desire and are able to gain over only the silly, and the mean, and the stupid, with women and children. In reply to which, we say that, as if, while Jesus teaches continence, and says, Whosoever looks upon a woman to lust after her, has already committed adultery with her in his heart, one were to behold a few of those who are deemed to be Christians living licentiously, he would most justly blame them for living contrary to the teaching of Jesus, but would act most unreasonably if he were to charge the Gospel with their censurable conduct; so, if he found nevertheless that the doctrine of the Christians invites men to wisdom, the blame then must remain with those who rest in their own ignorance, and who utter, not what Celsus relates (for although some of them are simple and ignorant, they do not speak so shamelessly as he alleges), but other things of much less serious import, which, however, serve to turn aside men from the practice of wisdom. 3.59. Immediately after this, Celsus, perceiving that he has slandered us with too great bitterness, as if by way of defense expresses himself as follows: That I bring no heavier charge than what the truth compels me, any one may see from the following remarks. Those who invite to participation in other mysteries, make proclamation as follows: 'Every one who has clean hands, and a prudent tongue;' others again thus: 'He who is pure from all pollution, and whose soul is conscious of no evil, and who has lived well and justly.' Such is the proclamation made by those who promise purification from sins. But let us hear what kind of persons these Christians invite. Every one, they say, who is a sinner, who is devoid of understanding, who is a child, and, to speak generally, whoever is unfortunate, him will the kingdom of God receive. Do you not call him a sinner, then, who is unjust, and a thief, and a housebreaker, and a poisoner, and a committer of sacrilege, and a robber of the dead? What others would a man invite if he were issuing a proclamation for an assembly of robbers? Now, in answer to such statements, we say that it is not the same thing to invite those who are sick in soul to be cured, and those who are in health to the knowledge and study of divine things. We, however, keeping both these things in view, at first invite all men to be healed, and exhort those who are sinners to come to the consideration of the doctrines which teach men not to sin, and those who are devoid of understanding to those which beget wisdom, and those who are children to rise in their thoughts to manhood, and those who are simply unfortunate to good fortune, or - which is the more appropriate term to use - to blessedness. And when those who have been turned towards virtue have made progress, and have shown that they have been purified by the word, and have led as far as they can a better life, then and not before do we invite them to participation in our mysteries. For we speak wisdom among them that are perfect.
22. Plotinus, Enneads, (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

23. Jerome, Letters, 133.4 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

24. Jerome, Letters, 133.4 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

25. Jerome, Letters, 133.4 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

26. Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters, 5.17 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

27. Epigraphy, Seg, 33.147



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adoption,and status Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 34
adoption Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 34
adornment Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
adrasteia Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56
aetiology Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204
aetiology of sacrifice Hitch (2017), Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world, 148
aidos Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 207
ammonius Brenk and Lanzillotta (2023), Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians, 206
ancestors,wicked (incl. titans) Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 85
anchises Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
anthropogony,in early cosmology Bartninkas (2023), Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy. 101
anthropogony,in religious tradition Bartninkas (2023), Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy. 101
antidosis Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 34
aphrodite,and pandora Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 35
aphrodite Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 22; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32; Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56; Tor (2017), Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology, 89
apollodoros son of pasion,and family Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 166
ariadne Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
astyages Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 85
athena,parthenos Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 35
athena,technical skills Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 35
athena Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 22; Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69; Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56; Tor (2017), Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology, 89
athena parthenos,pheidias,,iconography Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 60
athens,erechtheion Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 60
athens,sacred regulations Hitch (2017), Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world, 148
audience Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 41
beauty Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
bed,conjugal,delivery bed Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
beloved,impervious Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 207
beloved Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 207
bread McGowan (1999), Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals, 63
bricoleur,bricolage Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 85
callimachus Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204
calliope Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69
catullus Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
change Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 41
characterization de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 158
charis Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 207
charites Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
chêrôstai Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 34
cincius alimentus Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
ciris Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
clay Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 41
collegia McGowan (1999), Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals, 63
colony,greek Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 34
contemplation Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 123
cosmos Brenk and Lanzillotta (2023), Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians, 206
creation Brenk and Lanzillotta (2023), Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians, 206
crowns of flowers Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 22
crushing,death by Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
cyprian,letter McGowan (1999), Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals, 63
daphnis Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204
demeter Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56
dionysus,dismemberment and death of Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 85
dionysus,ruler of cosmos Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 85
dionysus of halicarnassus Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
dios apate Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
dipolieia Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 642
disputes,in political theory Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 34
divination,the delphic oracle Tor (2017), Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology, 88
division of inheritance Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 166
dyad Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56
ekphrasis Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204
emotional restraint,narratology of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 296
emotions,agony de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 296
emotions,anger/rage de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 158
emotions,love/passion de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 158
emotions Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 41
epic,evidence from Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 166
epimetheus Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 35
epos Albrecht (2014), The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity, 48
eros Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
error,primal Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 85
eudorus of alexandria Brenk and Lanzillotta (2023), Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians, 206
exempla and exemplarity Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
fabius pictor Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
fates Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56
father,fatherhood Albrecht (2014), The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity, 48
fire,invention of Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 22
fish McGowan (1999), Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals, 63
gaia Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69
galatea Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204
gamos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
god; gods Brenk and Lanzillotta (2023), Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians, 206
goddesses,textile work Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 35
golden maidens Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69
graces Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 22
greed and bribery and acquisitiveness Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
hecate Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69
helen Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56
helen of sparta/troy Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
hellenistic and roman myth/history,literature Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
hephaestus Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 22; Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 35; Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 41; Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69
hephaisteion,athens,anthemon Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 60
hephaisteion,athens,inscription of construction accounts Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 60
hephaisteion,athens,technique and structure Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 60
hera,adornment Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
hera,seduction Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
hera Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 296
heracles/hercules,greek heracles de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 158, 296
hermes Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 35; Tor (2017), Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology, 89
heroism Edmonds (2004), Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets, 42
hesiod,on female and male Tor (2017), Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology, 88, 89, 90
hesiod,on prometheus and pandora Tor (2017), Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology, 88, 90
hesiod,on zeus Tor (2017), Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology, 88, 89, 90
hesiod,pheidian circle and Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 60
hesiod,the muses address Tor (2017), Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology, 88, 89, 90
hesiod Brenk and Lanzillotta (2023), Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians, 206; Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 35; Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 34; Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69, 204; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 158, 296
hierarchy of virtues Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 123
homicide Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 642
honour de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 158
humanity,creation of Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 85
hybris de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 158
hypnos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
iapetus Bacchi (2022), Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics, 172
ida,mount Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
intellect Brenk and Lanzillotta (2023), Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians, 206
io de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 296
justice Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69
kalon kakon Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
kos Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 642
lament Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204
laws,of the polis Hitch (2017), Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world, 148
lease,orphans estate Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 34
literal meaning Brenk and Lanzillotta (2023), Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians, 206
locative Edmonds (2004), Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets, 42
lot Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 166
love,eros,and sexuality Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
lucilla,and the donatist schism Ashbrook Harvey et al. (2015), A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer, 159
luxury and anti-luxury Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
lycaon Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 85
marriage Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
maternal-material-thesis Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56
mecone Edmunds (2021), Greek Myth, 86
medea Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
memory Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69
mimesis Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204
mise en abyme de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 296
misogyny,hesiod Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 35
misogyny Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 35
mnemosyne Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69
muses,the Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69
muses Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56
myth Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 642
mêtis Tor (2017), Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology, 88, 89, 90
necessity Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56
neoteric literature Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
noah Bacchi (2022), Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics, 172
nothos,inheritance Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 34
nymphs Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 22
oath Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69
oceanus Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69
okeanos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
optatus,account of lucilla Ashbrook Harvey et al. (2015), A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer, 159
optatus,scholarly readings of Ashbrook Harvey et al. (2015), A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer, 159
oracles Hitch (2017), Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world, 148
orphan Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 34
ovid Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
pain/suffering de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 296
pan-hellenic sacrifice Hitch (2017), Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world, 148
pan Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204
pandora Bremmer (2008), Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East, 22; Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 35; Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 41; Edmunds (2021), Greek Myth, 86; Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 85; Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69, 204; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32; Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 60; Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56, 123; Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 207
parthenius Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
parthenoi,goddesses Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 35
parthenos/parthenoi Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
pathos (πάθος) de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 296
peisidice Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
petelia, hipponion Edmonds (2004), Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets, 42
philo of alexandria Brenk and Lanzillotta (2023), Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians, 206
phrygia Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
pictorial representations Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204
plausible lie Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69
poetry,and aesthetic pleasure Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204
poetry,and aristocratic power Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69
polis-religion Hitch (2017), Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world, 148
polyphemus Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204
porphyry Hitch (2017), Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world, 148
procession and emanation Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56
prometheus Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 41; Edmunds (2021), Greek Myth, 86; Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 85; Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 642; Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 158, 296
prometheus bound de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 296
prytaneion/is Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 642
punishment de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 158
purification Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 123
pygmalion Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 207
race of women Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 41
rational soul and reason Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 123
receptivity,and the female Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56
relics,veneration of Ashbrook Harvey et al. (2015), A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer, 159
religion Brenk and Lanzillotta (2023), Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians, 206; Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 35
rhea Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56
rite de passage, sacrifice Edmonds (2004), Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets, 42
rite de passage Edmonds (2004), Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets, 42; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 296
sacrifice,corrupted Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 85
sacrifice,cuisine of' McGowan (1999), Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals, 63
sacrifice Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 642; Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69; McGowan (1999), Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals, 63; Tor (2017), Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology, 88
scylla Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
sexual intercourse or reproduction Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56
sexuality Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
sicyon Edmunds (2021), Greek Myth, 86
sicyonians Edmunds (2021), Greek Myth, 86
simylus Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
soul,female souls Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56
soul Brenk and Lanzillotta (2023), Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians, 206; Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 123
sparta,and athens,institutions Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 34
statue bases of pheidian circle,,iconography Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 60
statue bases of pheidian circle,,technique Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 60
statue bases of pheidian circle Rutter and Sparkes (2012), Word and Image in Ancient Greece, 60
statues,and viewers Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 207
statues,beloved as Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 207
statues Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204
styx Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69
succession myth Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 85
sôgambros Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 34
tantalus Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 85
technical skills' "458.0_35.0@textile work,goddesses'" Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 35
tethys Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
theocritus,poet Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204
thyestes Graf and Johnston (2007), Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets, 85
thyrsis Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204
time Brenk and Lanzillotta (2023), Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians, 206
treasonous girl mytheme Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
trierarch Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 166
uranus Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69
utopia Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 204
veil Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti (2022), The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse, 32
vernant,jean-pierre Edmunds (2021), Greek Myth, 86
viewers Steiner (2001), Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought, 207
virtue,as equal for men and women Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 123
virtue,scale of virtues Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 123
virtue,specifically female virtues Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 123
wife,athena and Brule (2003), Women of Ancient Greece, 35
women,and story of lucilla Ashbrook Harvey et al. (2015), A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer, 159
women,as centerpieces of heresies Ashbrook Harvey et al. (2015), A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer, 159
women,as primary transgressors Ashbrook Harvey et al. (2015), A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer, 159
women and girls,as weakness Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
women and girls,motivations of Welch (2015), Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth. 26
zeus,polieus Humphreys (2018), Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis, 642
zeus Bacchi (2022), Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics, 172; Clay and Vergados (2022), Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry, 41; Edmunds (2021), Greek Myth, 86; Kirichenko (2022), Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age, 69; Schultz and Wilberding (2022), Women and the Female in Neoplatonism, 56; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster (2022), Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond, 158, 296