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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6474
Hesiod, Theogony, 559


Ἰαπετιονίδη, πάντων πέρι μήδεα εἰδώςGulped down. In holy Pytho, far below


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

18 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 101-105, 207-211, 42-50, 503, 51-100 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

100. Which brought the Death-Gods. Now in misery
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 101-108, 175, 180, 188, 221-222, 233-236, 26, 262, 27-28, 42-49, 494, 498-499, 50, 500, 507-509, 51, 510-519, 52, 520-529, 53, 530-539, 54, 540-549, 55, 550-558, 56, 560-569, 57, 570-579, 58, 580-599, 60, 600-616, 644-653, 655-659, 66, 660-663, 67, 70-74, 76-83, 838, 84-88, 886, 89-90, 901, 91-92, 921, 93-94, 945-948, 95, 953, 96-100 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

100. Employing gentle words persuasively
3. Homer, Iliad, 15.187-15.193 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

15.187. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.188. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.189. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.190. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.191. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.192. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.193. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet
4. Homer, Odyssey, 7.63-7.68, 7.311-7.315, 11.272-11.273 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 562-886, 561 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

561. τίς γῆ; τί γένος; τίνα φῶ λεύσσειν 561. What land is this? What people? By what name am I to call the one I see exposed to the tempest in bonds of rock? What offence have you committed that as punishment you are doomed to destruction?
6. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 562, 573-574, 587-588, 644, 561 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

561. πυκνοῦ κροτησμοῦ τυγχάνουσʼ ὑπὸ πτόλιν.
7. Isaeus, Orations, 5.6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 56.6 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Demosthenes, Orations, 48.12 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Anon., Sibylline Oracles, 3.97-3.104, 3.110-3.155 (1st cent. BCE - 5th cent. CE)

3.97. Then all the elements shall be bereft 3.98. of order, when the God who dwells on high 3.99. Shall roll the heaven, even as a scroll is rolled; 3.100. 100 And to the mighty earth and sea shall fall 3.101. The entire multiform sky; and there shall flow 3.102. A tireless cataract of raging fire 3.103. And it shall burn the land, and burn the sea 3.104. And heavenly sky, and night, and day, and melt 3.110. 110 The judgment midway in a mighty age 3.111. Shall come, when all these things shall come to pass. 3.112. O navigable waters and each land 3.113. of the Orient and of the Occident 3.114. Subject shall all things be to him who come 3.115. 115 Into the world again, and therefore he 3.116. Himself became first conscious of his power. 3.117. But when the threatenings of the mighty God 3.118. Are fulfilled, which he threatened mortals once 3.119. When in Assyrian land they built a tower;– 3.120. 120 (And they all spoke one language, and resolved 3.121. To mount aloft into the starry heaven; 3.122. But on the air the Immortal straightway put 3.123. A mighty force; and then winds from above 3.124. Cast down the great tower and stirred mortals up 3.125. 125 To wrangling with each other; therefore men 3.126. Gave to that city the name of Babylon);– 3.127. Now when the tower fell and the tongues of men 3.128. Turned to all sorts of sounds, straightway all earth 3.129. Was filled with men and kingdoms were divided; 3.130. 130 And then the generation tenth appeared 3.131. of mortal men, from the time when the flood 3.132. Came upon earlier men. And Cronos reigned 3.133. And Titan and Iapetus; and men called them 3.134. Best offspring of Gaia and of Uranus 3.135. 135 Giving to them names both of earth and heaven 3.136. Since they were very first of mortal men. 3.137. So there were three divisions of the earth 3.138. According to the allotment of each man 3.139. And each one having his own portion reigned 3.140. 140 And fought not; for a father's oaths were there 3.141. And equal were their portions. But the time 3.142. Complete of old age on the father came 3.143. And he died; and the sons infringing oath 3.144. Stirred up against each other bitter strife 3.145. 145 Which one should have the royal rank and rule 3.146. Over all mortals; and against each other 3.147. Cronos and Titan fought. But Rhea and Gaia 3.148. And Aphrodite fond of crowns, Demeter 3.149. And Hestia and Dione of fair lock 3.150. 150 Brought them to friendship, and together called 3.151. All who were kings, both brothers and near kin 3.152. And others of the same ancestral blood 3.153. And they judged Cronos should reign king of all 3.154. For he was oldest and of noblest form. 3.155. 155 But Titan laid on Cronos mighty oath
11. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.24.4-1.24.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.24.4. and there are statues of Zeus, one made by Leochares See Paus. 1.1.3 . and one called Polieus (Urban), the customary mode of sacrificing to whom I will give without adding the traditional reason thereof. Upon the altar of Zeus Polieus they place barley mixed with wheat and leave it unguarded. The ox, which they keep already prepared for sacrifice, goes to the altar and partakes of the grain. One of the priests they call the ox-slayer, who kills the ox and then, casting aside the axe here according to the ritual runs away. The others bring the axe to trial, as though they know not the man who did the deed. 1.24.5. Their ritual, then, is such as I have described. As you enter the temple that they name the Parthenon, all the sculptures you see on what is called the pediment refer to the birth of Athena, those on the rear pediment represent the contest for the land between Athena and Poseidon. The statue itself is made of ivory and gold. On the middle of her helmet is placed a likeness of the Sphinx—the tale of the Sphinx I will give when I come to my description of Boeotia—and on either side of the helmet are griffins in relief.
12. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.96 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.96 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 2.29-2.30 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.29. 29.For formerly, as we have before observed, when men sacrificed to the Gods fruits and not animals, and did not assume the latter for food, it is said, that a common sacrifice being celebrated at Athens, one Diomus, or Sopater, who was not a native, but cultivated some land in Attica, seizing a sharp axe which was near to him, and being excessively indigt, struck with it an ox, who, coming from his labour, approached to a table, on which were openly placed cakes and other offerings which were to be burnt as a sacrifice to the Gods, and ate some, but trampled on the rest of the offerings. The ox, therefore, being killed, Diomus, whose anger was now appeased, at the same time perceived what kind of deed he had perpetrated. And the ox, indeed, he buried. But embracing a voluntary banishment, as if he had been accused of impiety, he fled to Crete. A great dryness, however, taking place in the Attic land from vehement heat, and a dreadful sterility of fruit, and the Pythian deity being in consequence of it consulted by the general consent, the God answered, that the Cretan exile must expiate the crime; and that, if the murderer was punished, and the statue of the slain ox was erected in the place in which it fell, this would be beneficial both to those who had and those who had not tasted its flesh. An inquiry therefore being made into the affair, and Sopater, together with the deed, having been discovered, he, thinking that he should be liberated from the difficulty in which he was now involved, through the accusation of impiety, if the same thing was done by all men in common, said to those who came to him, that it was necessary an ox should be slain by the city. But, on their being dubious who should strike the ox, he said that he would undertake to do it, if they would make him a citizen, and would be partakers with him of the slaughter. This, therefore, being granted, they returned to the city, and ordered the deed to be accomplished in such a way as it is performed by them at present, [and which was as follows:] SPAN 2.30. 30.They selected virgins who were drawers of water; but these brought water for the purpose of sharpening an axe and a knife. And these being sharpened, one person gave the axe, another struck with it the ox, |62 and a third person cut the throat of the ox. But after this, having excoriated the animal, all that were present ate of its flesh. These things therefore being performed, they sewed up the hide of the ox, and having stuffed it with straw, raised it upright in the same form which it had when alive, and yoked it to a plough, as if it was about to work with it. Instituting also a judicial process, respecting the slaughter of the ox, they cited all those who were partakers of the deed, to defend their conduct. But as the drawers of water accused those who sharpened the axe and the knife, as more culpable than themselves, and those who sharpened these instruments accused him who gave the axe, and he accused him who cut the throat of the ox, and this last person accused the knife,---hence, as the knife could not speak, they condemned it as the cause of the slaughter. From that time also, even till now, during the festival sacred to Jupiter, in the Acropolis, at Athens, the sacrifice of an ox is performed after the same manner. For, placing cakes on a brazen table, they drive oxen round it, and the ox that tastes of the cakes that are distributed on the table, is slain. The race likewise of those who perform this, still remains. And all those, indeed, who derive their origin from Sopater are called boutupoi [i.e. slayers of oxen]; but those who are descended from him that drove the ox round the table, are called kentriadai, [or stimulators.] And those who originate from him that cut the throat of the ox, are denominated daitroi, [or dividers,] on account of the banquet which takes place from the distribution of flesh. But when they have filled the hide, and the judicial process is ended, they throw the knife into the sea. SPAN
15. Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters, 5.17 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

16. Epigraphy, Seg, 33.147

17. Epigraphy, Ml, 13

18. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 18, 89, 134



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adoption, and status Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
adoption Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
aetiology of sacrifice Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 148
ancestors, wicked (incl. titans) Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
antidosis Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
aphrodite Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 89
apollodoros son of pasion, and family Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 166
astyages Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
athena Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61; Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 89
athena parthenos, pheidias, iconography Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
athens, erechtheion Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
athens, sacred regulations Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 148
bread McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63
bricoleur, bricolage Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
characterization de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158
chêrôstai Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
collegia McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63
colony, greek Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
cronus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
cyprian, letter McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63
derveni poem Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
derveni poet Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
dionysus, dismemberment and death of Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
dionysus, ruler of cosmos Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
dionysus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
dipolieia Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
disputes, in political theory Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
divination, the delphic oracle Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88
division of inheritance Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 166
emotional restraint, narratology of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
emotions, agony de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
emotions, anger/rage de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158
emotions, love/passion de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158
epic, evidence from Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 166
epos Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 47
eros Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
error, primal Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
fat Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 186
father, fatherhood Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 47
fish McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63
gods, births of the gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
gods as elements, olympian gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
hephaisteion, athens, anthemon Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
hephaisteion, athens, inscription of construction accounts Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
hephaisteion, athens, technique and structure Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
hera Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
heracles/hercules, greek heracles de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158, 296
heracles Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61; Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 32
hermes Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278; Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 89
heroism Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 42
hesiod, on female and male Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88, 89, 90
hesiod, on prometheus and pandora Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88, 90
hesiod, on zeus Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88, 89, 90
hesiod, pheidian circle and Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
hesiod, the muses address Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88, 89, 90
hesiod Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61; Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 32; Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158, 296
hippocrates (son of apollodorus) Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278
homer Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 32
homicide Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
honour de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158
humanity, creation of Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
hybris de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158
iapetus Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 172
io de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
kairos Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278
kingship, divine Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
kos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
laws, of the polis Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 148
laws, sacred Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 186
lease, orphans estate Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
light Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278
locative Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 42
lot Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 166
lycaon Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
mecone Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86
metis Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
mise en abyme de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
muses Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
myth Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
mêtis Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88, 89, 90
night (goddess) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
noah Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 172
nothos, inheritance Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
oracles Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 148
orphan Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
orphic theogonies Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
pain/suffering de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
pan-hellenic sacrifice Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 148
pandora Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86; Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85; Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
pathos (πάθος) de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
persephone Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
persephones birth Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
petelia, hipponion Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 42
phanes Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
polis-religion Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 148
polis Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278
politike techne Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278
porphyry Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 148
prometheus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278; Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86; Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 186; Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158, 296
prometheus bound de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
protagoras Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278
protogonos (orphic god) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
prytaneion/is Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
punishment de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158
rhapsodies (orphic poem) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
rite de passage, sacrifice Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 42
rite de passage Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 42; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
ritual Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 303
sacrifice, corrupted Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
sacrifice, cuisine of' McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63
sacrifice Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642; McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63; Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88
sicyon Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86
sicyonians Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86
sparta, and athens, institutions Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
speech, zeus absence in Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 32
speech Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 32
statue bases of pheidian circle, iconography Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
statue bases of pheidian circle, technique Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
statue bases of pheidian circle Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
succession myth Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
swallowing, zeus swallowing of metis Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
swallowing, zeus swallowing of protogonos Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
sôgambros Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
tantalus Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
themis Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
thyestes Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
titans Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
trierarch Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 166
typhon Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
uranus phallus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
vernant, jean-pierre Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86
zeus, polieus Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61; Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 172; Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278; Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86; Faulkner and Hodkinson, Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns (2015) 32; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158, 296
zeus as king Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
zeus incest with his mother Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
zeus new creation of the world Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61
zeus pregnancy Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 61