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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6474
Hesiod, Theogony, 536-539


Μηκώνῃ, τότʼ ἔπειτα μέγαν βοῦν πρόφρονι θυμῷTo Lyctus, when her hour was near complete


δασσάμενος προέθηκε, Διὸς νόον ἐξαπαφίσκων.To bear great Zeus, her youngest progeny.


τοῖς μὲν γὰρ σάρκας τε καὶ ἔγκατα πίονα δημῷVast earth received him from her then, that she


ἐν ῥινῷ κατέθηκε καλύψας γαστρὶ βοείῃMight rear him in broad Crete. For there indeed


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

23 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 101-105, 336-337, 42-100 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

100. Which brought the Death-Gods. Now in misery
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 101, 1011-1018, 102-108, 175, 221-222, 233-236, 26, 262, 27-28, 42-44, 445-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49, 490-499, 50, 500-509, 51, 510-519, 52, 520-529, 53, 530-535, 537-539, 54, 540-549, 55, 550-559, 56, 560-569, 57, 570-579, 58, 580-599, 60, 600-616, 66-67, 70-74, 76-100 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

100. Employing gentle words persuasively
3. Homer, Iliad, 1.460-1.463, 2.422-2.425, 15.187-15.193 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.460. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.461. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.462. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.463. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 2.422. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.423. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.424. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.425. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. 15.187. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.188. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.189. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.190. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.191. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.192. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.193. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet
4. Homer, Odyssey, 7.63-7.68, 7.311-7.315 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 562-886, 561 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

561. τίς γῆ; τί γένος; τίνα φῶ λεύσσειν 561. What land is this? What people? By what name am I to call the one I see exposed to the tempest in bonds of rock? What offence have you committed that as punishment you are doomed to destruction?
6. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 562, 573-574, 587-588, 644, 561 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

561. πυκνοῦ κροτησμοῦ τυγχάνουσʼ ὑπὸ πτόλιν.
7. Aristophanes, Peace, 1040, 1039 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1039. ταυτὶ δέδραται. τίθεσο τὼ μηρὼ λαβών.
8. Herodotus, Histories, 4.35, 5.83 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4.35. In this way, then, these maidens are honored by the inhabitants of Delos. These same Delians relate that two virgins, Arge and Opis, came from the Hyperboreans by way of the aforesaid peoples to Delos earlier than Hyperoche and Laodice; ,these latter came to bring to Eileithyia the tribute which they had agreed to pay for easing child-bearing; but Arge and Opis, they say, came with the gods themselves, and received honors of their own from the Delians. ,For the women collected gifts for them, calling upon their names in the hymn made for them by Olen of Lycia; it was from Delos that the islanders and Ionians learned to sing hymns to Opis and Arge, calling upon their names and collecting gifts (this Olen, after coming from Lycia, also made the other and ancient hymns that are sung at Delos). ,Furthermore, they say that when the thighbones are burnt in sacrifice on the altar, the ashes are all cast on the burial-place of Opis and Arge, behind the temple of Artemis, looking east, nearest the refectory of the people of Ceos. 5.83. Now at this time, as before it, the Aeginetans were in all matters still subject to the Epidaurians and even crossed to Epidaurus for the hearing of their own private lawsuits. From this time, however, they began to build ships, and stubbornly revolted from the Epidaurians. ,In the course of this struggle, they did the Epidaurians much damage and stole their images of Damia and Auxesia. These they took away and set them up in the middle of their own country at a place called Oea, about twenty furlongs distant from their city. ,Having set them up in this place they sought their favor with sacrifices and female choruses in the satirical and abusive mode. Ten men were appointed providers of a chorus for each of the deities, and the choruses aimed their raillery not at any men but at the women of the country. The Epidaurians too had the same rites, and they have certain secret rites as well.
9. Isaeus, Orations, 5.6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

190c. Ephialtes and Otus, that scheming to assault the gods in fight they essayed to mount high heaven.
11. Sophocles, Antigone, 1006-1011, 1005 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 56.6 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

13. Demosthenes, Orations, 48.12 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

14. Menander, Dyscolus, 448-453, 447 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

15. Anon., Sibylline Oracles, 3.97-3.104, 3.110-3.155 (1st cent. BCE - 5th cent. CE)

3.97. Then all the elements shall be bereft 3.98. of order, when the God who dwells on high 3.99. Shall roll the heaven, even as a scroll is rolled; 3.100. 100 And to the mighty earth and sea shall fall 3.101. The entire multiform sky; and there shall flow 3.102. A tireless cataract of raging fire 3.103. And it shall burn the land, and burn the sea 3.104. And heavenly sky, and night, and day, and melt 3.110. 110 The judgment midway in a mighty age 3.111. Shall come, when all these things shall come to pass. 3.112. O navigable waters and each land 3.113. of the Orient and of the Occident 3.114. Subject shall all things be to him who come 3.115. 115 Into the world again, and therefore he 3.116. Himself became first conscious of his power. 3.117. But when the threatenings of the mighty God 3.118. Are fulfilled, which he threatened mortals once 3.119. When in Assyrian land they built a tower;– 3.120. 120 (And they all spoke one language, and resolved 3.121. To mount aloft into the starry heaven; 3.122. But on the air the Immortal straightway put 3.123. A mighty force; and then winds from above 3.124. Cast down the great tower and stirred mortals up 3.125. 125 To wrangling with each other; therefore men 3.126. Gave to that city the name of Babylon);– 3.127. Now when the tower fell and the tongues of men 3.128. Turned to all sorts of sounds, straightway all earth 3.129. Was filled with men and kingdoms were divided; 3.130. 130 And then the generation tenth appeared 3.131. of mortal men, from the time when the flood 3.132. Came upon earlier men. And Cronos reigned 3.133. And Titan and Iapetus; and men called them 3.134. Best offspring of Gaia and of Uranus 3.135. 135 Giving to them names both of earth and heaven 3.136. Since they were very first of mortal men. 3.137. So there were three divisions of the earth 3.138. According to the allotment of each man 3.139. And each one having his own portion reigned 3.140. 140 And fought not; for a father's oaths were there 3.141. And equal were their portions. But the time 3.142. Complete of old age on the father came 3.143. And he died; and the sons infringing oath 3.144. Stirred up against each other bitter strife 3.145. 145 Which one should have the royal rank and rule 3.146. Over all mortals; and against each other 3.147. Cronos and Titan fought. But Rhea and Gaia 3.148. And Aphrodite fond of crowns, Demeter 3.149. And Hestia and Dione of fair lock 3.150. 150 Brought them to friendship, and together called 3.151. All who were kings, both brothers and near kin 3.152. And others of the same ancestral blood 3.153. And they judged Cronos should reign king of all 3.154. For he was oldest and of noblest form. 3.155. 155 But Titan laid on Cronos mighty oath
16. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.24.4-1.24.5, 5.13.9, 8.38.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.24.4. and there are statues of Zeus, one made by Leochares See Paus. 1.1.3 . and one called Polieus (Urban), the customary mode of sacrificing to whom I will give without adding the traditional reason thereof. Upon the altar of Zeus Polieus they place barley mixed with wheat and leave it unguarded. The ox, which they keep already prepared for sacrifice, goes to the altar and partakes of the grain. One of the priests they call the ox-slayer, who kills the ox and then, casting aside the axe here according to the ritual runs away. The others bring the axe to trial, as though they know not the man who did the deed. 1.24.5. Their ritual, then, is such as I have described. As you enter the temple that they name the Parthenon, all the sculptures you see on what is called the pediment refer to the birth of Athena, those on the rear pediment represent the contest for the land between Athena and Poseidon. The statue itself is made of ivory and gold. On the middle of her helmet is placed a likeness of the Sphinx—the tale of the Sphinx I will give when I come to my description of Boeotia—and on either side of the helmet are griffins in relief. 5.13.9. The first stage of the altar at Olympia, called prothysis, has a circumference of one hundred and twenty-five feet; the circumference of the stage on the prothysis is thirty-two feet; the total height of the altar reaches to twenty-two feet. The victims themselves it is the custom to sacrifice on the lower stage, the prothysis. But the thighs they carry up to the highest part of the altar and burn them there. 8.38.8. On the east side of the mountain there is a sanctuary of Apollo surnamed Parrhasian. They also give him the name Pythian. They hold every year a festival in honor of the god and sacrifice in the market-place a boar to Apollo Helper, and after the sacrifice here they at once carry the victim to the sanctuary of Parrhasian Apollo in procession to the music of the flute; cutting out the thigh-bones they burn them, and also consume the meat of the victim on the spot.
17. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 9.26, 10.96 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.26. To Lupercus. When referring to a certain orator of our own times, who was a straightforward and level-headed speaker, but lacked the grand manner and ornateness, I said, rather neatly in my opinion, "He has no faults, except it be a fault that he has none." For an orator ought to soar to great heights and be carried away by his feelings, and, on some occasions, he ought to rage and storm, and frequently get near the brink of a precipice, for precipices usually lie near high and exalted places. One travels more safely along level ground, but the road is low and undistinguished, and those who run are more likely to stumble than those who creep, yet the latter get no credit for not falling, while the former, despite their fall, often do. It is exactly the same with oratory as with other arts; it is the difficulty of the task which makes the credit of the achievement. You may notice how the tight-rope walkers, who are struggling along at a great height, evoke the loudest applause just when they seem to be on the point of falling, for those events create most wonder which are least expected, most hazardous, and, as the Greeks still better express it, are most recklessly daring. The skill of a helmsman is by no means so great when he is sailing on a smooth sea as when a tempest is raging; in the former case, there is no one to wonder at his skill as he enters the harbour unheeded and without applause; it is only when the ropes are creaking, and the mast is bent, and the helm is groaning, that the pilot appears in all his glory, and seems most like one of the deities of the sea. I am writing in this strain, because I think you have marked some passages in my works as turgid which I consider lofty, and others, as indiscreet and overdone, which seem to me to be boldly and adequately dealt with. But it makes all the difference whether the marks you have made signify your disapproval of a passage, or merely that it is a striking one. For anything which stands out conspicuously catches the eye, but it requires careful attention to decide whether it is out of proportion or cast on a grand scale, whether it is lofty or disproportionately high. But let me refer to Homer for examples, for who can fail to notice the extreme differences of style between "The great heaven trumpeted around,""His lance rested on the clouds," and all the passage beginning, "Not so loud thunders the wave of the sea" ? * One needs the most delicate pair of scales to decide whether these are empty marvels, which no one should credit, or magnificent and divinely inspired passages. I do not, of course, say that I have ever uttered parallel passages to these, or that I ever could utter them. I am not so mad as all that, but the point I do wish to make is that sometimes eloquence must be given a free rein, and that the rush of genius must not be restrained within too narrow a circuit. But, you will say, there is one rule for orators, and another for poets. Still, Marcus Tullius showed just the same daring as Homer - and yet I will say no more about Tullius, for, with respect to him, there is no possibility of dispute. However, take the case of Demosthenes, who is the pattern and model of all orators. Does he rein and curb himself in that well-known passage, "these scoundrels, flatterers, and polluted wretches," or again, "Not with walls of stone or brick did I fortify the city," or again, "Did I not set Euboea to be a bulwark to Attica on the side of the sea" ? or again, "For my own part, men of Athens, I swear I think he is intoxicated by the vastness of his own achievements"? ** What could be more daring than the fine digression beginning, "For a disease ..." or than this passage, shorter than those I have quoted above, but equally bold, "Then indeed I resisted the audacity of Python's eloquence, which was rushing like a tide upon you"? † In the same style he writes I am arguing against my argument, and you will say that Demosthenes is censured for these extravagances of his. But just notice how much finer Demosthenes is than his critic, and finer just because of his extravagances. Elsewhere, he shows his force, in these passages he shows how much he towers above others. Besides, did Aeschines abstain from the faults which he carped at in Demosthenes? What about this sentence
18. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 9.26, 10.96 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.26. To Lupercus. When referring to a certain orator of our own times, who was a straightforward and level-headed speaker, but lacked the grand manner and ornateness, I said, rather neatly in my opinion, "He has no faults, except it be a fault that he has none." For an orator ought to soar to great heights and be carried away by his feelings, and, on some occasions, he ought to rage and storm, and frequently get near the brink of a precipice, for precipices usually lie near high and exalted places. One travels more safely along level ground, but the road is low and undistinguished, and those who run are more likely to stumble than those who creep, yet the latter get no credit for not falling, while the former, despite their fall, often do. It is exactly the same with oratory as with other arts; it is the difficulty of the task which makes the credit of the achievement. You may notice how the tight-rope walkers, who are struggling along at a great height, evoke the loudest applause just when they seem to be on the point of falling, for those events create most wonder which are least expected, most hazardous, and, as the Greeks still better express it, are most recklessly daring. The skill of a helmsman is by no means so great when he is sailing on a smooth sea as when a tempest is raging; in the former case, there is no one to wonder at his skill as he enters the harbour unheeded and without applause; it is only when the ropes are creaking, and the mast is bent, and the helm is groaning, that the pilot appears in all his glory, and seems most like one of the deities of the sea. I am writing in this strain, because I think you have marked some passages in my works as turgid which I consider lofty, and others, as indiscreet and overdone, which seem to me to be boldly and adequately dealt with. But it makes all the difference whether the marks you have made signify your disapproval of a passage, or merely that it is a striking one. For anything which stands out conspicuously catches the eye, but it requires careful attention to decide whether it is out of proportion or cast on a grand scale, whether it is lofty or disproportionately high. But let me refer to Homer for examples, for who can fail to notice the extreme differences of style between "The great heaven trumpeted around,""His lance rested on the clouds," and all the passage beginning, "Not so loud thunders the wave of the sea" ? * One needs the most delicate pair of scales to decide whether these are empty marvels, which no one should credit, or magnificent and divinely inspired passages. I do not, of course, say that I have ever uttered parallel passages to these, or that I ever could utter them. I am not so mad as all that, but the point I do wish to make is that sometimes eloquence must be given a free rein, and that the rush of genius must not be restrained within too narrow a circuit. But, you will say, there is one rule for orators, and another for poets. Still, Marcus Tullius showed just the same daring as Homer - and yet I will say no more about Tullius, for, with respect to him, there is no possibility of dispute. However, take the case of Demosthenes, who is the pattern and model of all orators. Does he rein and curb himself in that well-known passage, "these scoundrels, flatterers, and polluted wretches," or again, "Not with walls of stone or brick did I fortify the city," or again, "Did I not set Euboea to be a bulwark to Attica on the side of the sea" ? or again, "For my own part, men of Athens, I swear I think he is intoxicated by the vastness of his own achievements"? ** What could be more daring than the fine digression beginning, "For a disease ..." or than this passage, shorter than those I have quoted above, but equally bold, "Then indeed I resisted the audacity of Python's eloquence, which was rushing like a tide upon you"? † In the same style he writes I am arguing against my argument, and you will say that Demosthenes is censured for these extravagances of his. But just notice how much finer Demosthenes is than his critic, and finer just because of his extravagances. Elsewhere, he shows his force, in these passages he shows how much he towers above others. Besides, did Aeschines abstain from the faults which he carped at in Demosthenes? What about this sentence
19. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 2.15-2.16, 2.29-2.30 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.15. 15.Experience also testifies that the Gods rejoice in this more than in sumptuous offerings. For when that Thessalian sacrificed to the Pythian deity oxen with gilt horns, and hecatombs, Apollo said, that the offering of Hermioneus was more gratifying to him, though he had only sacrificed as much meal as he could take with his three fingers out of a sack. But when the Thessalian, on hearing this, placed all the rest of his offerings on the altar the God again said, that by so doing his present was doubly more unacceptable to him than his former offering. Hence the sacrifice which is attended with a small expense is pleasing to the Gods, and divinity looks more to the disposition and manners of those that sacrifice, than to the multitude of the things which are sacrificed. SPAN 2.16. 16.Theopompus likewise narrates things similar to these, viz. that a certain Magnesian came from Asia to Delphi; a man very rich, and abounding in cattle, and that he was accustomed every year to make many and magnificent sacrifices to the Gods, partly through the abundance of his possessions, and partly through piety and wishing to please the Gods. But being thus disposed, he came to the divinity at Delphi, bringing with him a hecatomb for the God, and magnificently honouring Apollo, he consulted his oracle. Conceiving also that he worshipped the Gods in a manner more beautiful than that of all other men, he asked the Pythian deity who the man was that, with the greatest promptitude, and in the best manner, venerated divinity, and |53 made the most acceptable sacrifices, conceiving that on this occasion the God would deem him to be pre-eminent. The Pythian deity however answered, that Clearchus, who dwelt in Methydrium, a town of Arcadia, worshipped the Gods in a way surpassing that of all other men. But the Magnesian being astonished, was desirous of seeing Clearchus, and of learning from him the manner in which he performed his sacrifices. Swiftly, therefore, betaking himself to Methydrium, in the first place, indeed, he despised the smallness and vileness of the town, conceiving that neither any private person, nor even the whole city, could honour the Gods more magnificently and more beautifully than he did. Meeting, however, with the man, he thought fit to ask him after what manner he reverenced the Gods. But Clearchus answered him, that he diligently sacrificed to them at proper times in every month at the new moon, crowning and adorning the statues of Hermes and Hecate, and the other sacred images which were left to us by our ancestors, and that he also honoured the Gods with frankincense, and sacred wafers and cakes. He likewise said, that he performed public sacrifices annually, omitting no festive day; and that in these festivals he worshipped the Gods, not by slaying oxen, nor by cutting victims into fragments, but that he sacrificed whatever he might casually meet with, sedulously offering the first-fruits to the Gods of all the vegetable productions of the seasons, and of all the fruits with which he was supplied. He added, that some of these he placed before the [statues of the] Gods,6 but that he burnt others on their altars; and that, being studious of frugality, he avoided the sacrificing of oxen. SPAN 2.29. 29.For formerly, as we have before observed, when men sacrificed to the Gods fruits and not animals, and did not assume the latter for food, it is said, that a common sacrifice being celebrated at Athens, one Diomus, or Sopater, who was not a native, but cultivated some land in Attica, seizing a sharp axe which was near to him, and being excessively indigt, struck with it an ox, who, coming from his labour, approached to a table, on which were openly placed cakes and other offerings which were to be burnt as a sacrifice to the Gods, and ate some, but trampled on the rest of the offerings. The ox, therefore, being killed, Diomus, whose anger was now appeased, at the same time perceived what kind of deed he had perpetrated. And the ox, indeed, he buried. But embracing a voluntary banishment, as if he had been accused of impiety, he fled to Crete. A great dryness, however, taking place in the Attic land from vehement heat, and a dreadful sterility of fruit, and the Pythian deity being in consequence of it consulted by the general consent, the God answered, that the Cretan exile must expiate the crime; and that, if the murderer was punished, and the statue of the slain ox was erected in the place in which it fell, this would be beneficial both to those who had and those who had not tasted its flesh. An inquiry therefore being made into the affair, and Sopater, together with the deed, having been discovered, he, thinking that he should be liberated from the difficulty in which he was now involved, through the accusation of impiety, if the same thing was done by all men in common, said to those who came to him, that it was necessary an ox should be slain by the city. But, on their being dubious who should strike the ox, he said that he would undertake to do it, if they would make him a citizen, and would be partakers with him of the slaughter. This, therefore, being granted, they returned to the city, and ordered the deed to be accomplished in such a way as it is performed by them at present, [and which was as follows:] SPAN 2.30. 30.They selected virgins who were drawers of water; but these brought water for the purpose of sharpening an axe and a knife. And these being sharpened, one person gave the axe, another struck with it the ox, |62 and a third person cut the throat of the ox. But after this, having excoriated the animal, all that were present ate of its flesh. These things therefore being performed, they sewed up the hide of the ox, and having stuffed it with straw, raised it upright in the same form which it had when alive, and yoked it to a plough, as if it was about to work with it. Instituting also a judicial process, respecting the slaughter of the ox, they cited all those who were partakers of the deed, to defend their conduct. But as the drawers of water accused those who sharpened the axe and the knife, as more culpable than themselves, and those who sharpened these instruments accused him who gave the axe, and he accused him who cut the throat of the ox, and this last person accused the knife,---hence, as the knife could not speak, they condemned it as the cause of the slaughter. From that time also, even till now, during the festival sacred to Jupiter, in the Acropolis, at Athens, the sacrifice of an ox is performed after the same manner. For, placing cakes on a brazen table, they drive oxen round it, and the ox that tastes of the cakes that are distributed on the table, is slain. The race likewise of those who perform this, still remains. And all those, indeed, who derive their origin from Sopater are called boutupoi [i.e. slayers of oxen]; but those who are descended from him that drove the ox round the table, are called kentriadai, [or stimulators.] And those who originate from him that cut the throat of the ox, are denominated daitroi, [or dividers,] on account of the banquet which takes place from the distribution of flesh. But when they have filled the hide, and the judicial process is ended, they throw the knife into the sea. SPAN
20. Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters, 1.1, 3.6, 4.22, 5.17, 9.6 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

21. Zosimus, New History, 6.4, 6.13 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

22. Epigraphy, Seg, 33.147

23. Epigraphy, Ml, 13



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abel Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326
adoption, and status Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
adoption Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
aetiology of sacrifice Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 148
altars, bones burned on Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
ancestors, wicked (incl. titans) Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
anthropogony Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 49
anthropology Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 503
antidosis Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
aphrodite Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 89
apollodoros son of pasion, and family Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 166
aristophanes Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 165
astyages Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
athena Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 89
athena parthenos, pheidias, iconography Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
athens, erechtheion Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
athens, sacred regulations Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 148
bones Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 15, 23
bread McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63
bricoleur, bricolage Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
cain Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326
characterization de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158
christianity Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 2; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326
chthonic Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 2
chêrôstai Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
cohen, anthony Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 18
collegia McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63
colony, greek Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
cronus Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 49
cyprian, letter McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63
dikê/δίκη Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 49
dionysus, dismemberment and death of Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
dionysus, ruler of cosmos Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
dipolieia Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
disputes, in political theory Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
divination, the delphic oracle Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88
division of inheritance Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 166
earth/earth/gaea Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 49
emotional restraint, narratology of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
emotions, agony de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
emotions, anger/rage de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158
emotions, love/passion de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158
epic, evidence from Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 166
epos Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 47
error, primal Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
ethnography, and anthropology Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 503
ethnography Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 503
euchesthai Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 165
eumaeus Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 165
fat Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 15, 23, 186
father, fatherhood Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 47
fish McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63
genealogy Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 49
greek identity Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 503
halikarnassos. mausoleum Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
hebrews Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326
hephaisteion, athens, anthemon Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
hephaisteion, athens, inscription of construction accounts Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
hephaisteion, athens, technique and structure Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
hera de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
heracles/hercules, greek heracles de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158, 296
hermes Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278; Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 89
heroism Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 42
hesiod, on female and male Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88, 89, 90
hesiod, on prometheus and pandora Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88, 90
hesiod, on zeus Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88, 89, 90
hesiod, pheidian circle and Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
hesiod, the muses address Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88, 89, 90
hesiod Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 165; Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326; Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 18; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158, 296
hippocrates (son of apollodorus) Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278
homer Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 165
homicide Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
honour de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158
humanity, creation of Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
hybris de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158
hymns Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 165
iapetos Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 21
iapetus Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 172
io de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
japheth Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 21
judaism Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326
kairos Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278
killing Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 2
knise Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 15, 23
kos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
laws, of the polis Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 148
laws, sacred Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 186
lease, orphans estate Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
libations Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 165
light Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278
locative Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 42
lot Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 166
lower legs Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
lycaon Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
malkin, irad Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 503
mecone Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86
mekone Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 21; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23; Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 18
mise en abyme de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
myth Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
mêtis Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88, 89, 90
noah Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 172
nothos, inheritance Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
odysseus Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 503
oracles Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 148
orphan Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
osphys Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 15
pain/suffering de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
pan-hellenic sacrifice Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 148
pandora Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 21; Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86; Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85; Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
pathos (πάθος) de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
petelia, hipponion Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 42
phoenicia Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326
phoroneus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 21
plato Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 165
polis-religion Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 148
polis Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278
politics Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 49
politike techne Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278
porphyry Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 165; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 148
prayer Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 165; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 2
prometheus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278; Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86; Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 2, 15, 23, 186; Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326; Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 18; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158, 296
prometheus bound de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
protagoras Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278
prytaneion/is Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
punishment de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158
pyre deposits Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
pyrrhichistai, offerings Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 18
pyrrhichistai, sacrifices Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 18
rite de passage, sacrifice Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 42
rite de passage Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 42; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 296
ritual Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 303
sacrifice, corrupted Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
sacrifice, cuisine of' McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63
sacrifice Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 21; Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 165; Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642; McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 63; Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 88
sacrifices, and community Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 18
sacrifices, hesiod on Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 18
sacrificial Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 2
sacrum bone Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 15
sicyon Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86
sicyonians Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86
smoke Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
sparta, and athens, institutions Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
statue bases of pheidian circle, iconography Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
statue bases of pheidian circle, technique Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
statue bases of pheidian circle Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 60
succession myth Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
sôgambros Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 34
tail, vertebrae Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 15
tail Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
tantalus Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
theories, big theories of sacrifice Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 2
theoxenia Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 2
thighbones Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 15, 23
thyestes Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 85
thysia-sacrifice Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 15, 23
trierarch Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 166
vegetal, offerings Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 2
vernant, jean-pierre Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86; Shear, Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (2021) 18
zeus, polieus Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 642
zeus Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 172; Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 278; Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 21; Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 86; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 158, 296
zooarchaeology Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 15, 23