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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6474
Hesiod, Theogony, 48


ἀρχόμεναί θʼ ὑμνεῦσι καὶ ἐκλήγουσαι ἀοιδῆςRound Olympus’ snowy peaks while echoing


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 10, 2-5, 535-537, 561-567, 6-9, 1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1. Pierian Muses, with your songs of praise
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 10, 100-109, 11, 110-115, 12-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-47, 49, 5, 50, 507-509, 51, 510-519, 52, 520-529, 53, 530-539, 54, 540-549, 55, 550-559, 56, 560-569, 57, 570-579, 58, 580-589, 59, 590-599, 6, 60, 600, 61-69, 7, 70-79, 8, 80-89, 9, 90-99, 1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1. From the Heliconian Muses let me sing:
3. Homer, Iliad, 2.484-2.492 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.484. /Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— 2.485. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.486. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.487. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.488. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.489. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.490. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.491. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.492. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains
4. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 157-164, 156 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

156. You walked on craggy Cynthus or abroad
5. Plato, Protagoras, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

320c. do not grudge us your demonstration.
6. Protagoras, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 14-15, 13 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Anon., Sibylline Oracles, 3.97-3.104, 3.110-3.155 (1st cent. BCE - 5th cent. CE)

3.97. Then all the elements shall be bereft 3.98. of order, when the God who dwells on high 3.99. Shall roll the heaven, even as a scroll is rolled; 3.100. 100 And to the mighty earth and sea shall fall 3.101. The entire multiform sky; and there shall flow 3.102. A tireless cataract of raging fire 3.103. And it shall burn the land, and burn the sea 3.104. And heavenly sky, and night, and day, and melt 3.110. 110 The judgment midway in a mighty age 3.111. Shall come, when all these things shall come to pass. 3.112. O navigable waters and each land 3.113. of the Orient and of the Occident 3.114. Subject shall all things be to him who come 3.115. 115 Into the world again, and therefore he 3.116. Himself became first conscious of his power. 3.117. But when the threatenings of the mighty God 3.118. Are fulfilled, which he threatened mortals once 3.119. When in Assyrian land they built a tower;– 3.120. 120 (And they all spoke one language, and resolved 3.121. To mount aloft into the starry heaven; 3.122. But on the air the Immortal straightway put 3.123. A mighty force; and then winds from above 3.124. Cast down the great tower and stirred mortals up 3.125. 125 To wrangling with each other; therefore men 3.126. Gave to that city the name of Babylon);– 3.127. Now when the tower fell and the tongues of men 3.128. Turned to all sorts of sounds, straightway all earth 3.129. Was filled with men and kingdoms were divided; 3.130. 130 And then the generation tenth appeared 3.131. of mortal men, from the time when the flood 3.132. Came upon earlier men. And Cronos reigned 3.133. And Titan and Iapetus; and men called them 3.134. Best offspring of Gaia and of Uranus 3.135. 135 Giving to them names both of earth and heaven 3.136. Since they were very first of mortal men. 3.137. So there were three divisions of the earth 3.138. According to the allotment of each man 3.139. And each one having his own portion reigned 3.140. 140 And fought not; for a father's oaths were there 3.141. And equal were their portions. But the time 3.142. Complete of old age on the father came 3.143. And he died; and the sons infringing oath 3.144. Stirred up against each other bitter strife 3.145. 145 Which one should have the royal rank and rule 3.146. Over all mortals; and against each other 3.147. Cronos and Titan fought. But Rhea and Gaia 3.148. And Aphrodite fond of crowns, Demeter 3.149. And Hestia and Dione of fair lock 3.150. 150 Brought them to friendship, and together called 3.151. All who were kings, both brothers and near kin 3.152. And others of the same ancestral blood 3.153. And they judged Cronos should reign king of all 3.154. For he was oldest and of noblest form. 3.155. 155 But Titan laid on Cronos mighty oath
9. Horace, Odes, 3.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.4. he found no one but Vespasian equal to the task, and able to undergo the great burden of so mighty a war, seeing he was growing an old man already in the camp, and from his youth had been exercised in warlike exploits: he was also a man that had long ago pacified the west, and made it subject to the Romans, when it had been put into disorder by the Germans; he had also recovered to them Britain by his arms 3.4. “Thou, O Vespasian, thinkest no more than that thou hast taken Josephus himself captive; but I come to thee as a messenger of greater tidings; for had not I been sent by God to thee, I knew what was the law of the Jews in this case? and how it becomes generals to die. 3.4. its length is also from Meloth to Thella, a village near to Jordan.
10. Ovid, Tristia, 2.219-2.220 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Vergil, Aeneis, 5.592-5.593, 7.37-7.45, 9.716 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.592. rushed fiercer to the fight, his strength now roused 5.593. by rage, while shame and courage confident 7.37. Then, gazing from the deep, Aeneas saw 7.38. a stretch of groves, whence Tiber 's smiling stream 7.39. its tumbling current rich with yellow sands 7.40. burst seaward forth: around it and above 7.41. hore-haunting birds of varied voice and plume 7.42. flattered the sky with song, and, circling far 7.43. o'er river-bed and grove, took joyful wing. 7.44. Thither to landward now his ships he steered 9.716. only with far-flung shafts the bastion strong.
12. New Testament, Romans, 1.18-1.32 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.18. For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who suppress the truth in unrighteousness 1.19. because that which is known of God is revealed in them, for God revealed it to them. 1.20. For the invisible things of him since the creation of the world are clearly seen, being perceived through the things that are made, even his everlasting power and divinity; that they may be without excuse. 1.21. Because, knowing God, they didn't glorify him as God, neither gave thanks, but became vain in their reasoning, and their senseless heart was darkened. 1.22. Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools 1.23. and traded the glory of the incorruptible God for the likeness of an image of corruptible man, and of birds, and four-footed animals, and creeping things. 1.24. Therefore God also gave them up in the lusts of their hearts to uncleanness, that their bodies should be dishonored among themselves 1.25. who exchanged the truth of God for a lie, and worshiped and served the creature rather than the Creator, who is blessed forever. Amen. 1.26. For this reason, God gave them up to vile passions. For their women changed the natural function into that which is against nature. 1.27. Likewise also the men, leaving the natural function of the woman, burned in their lust toward one another, men doing what is inappropriate with men, and receiving in themselves the due penalty of their error. 1.28. Even as they refused to have God in their knowledge, God gave them up to a reprobate mind, to do those things which are not fitting; 1.29. being filled with all unrighteousness, sexual immorality, wickedness, covetousness, maliciousness; full of envy, murder, strife, deceit, evil habits, secret slanderers 1.30. backbiters, hateful to God, insolent, haughty, boastful, inventors of evil things, disobedient to parents 1.31. without understanding, covet-breakers, without natural affection, unforgiving, unmerciful; 1.32. who, knowing the ordice of God, that those who practice such things are worthy of death, not only do the same, but also approve of those who practice them.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneas Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 139
anderson, william Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 139
apollo (god), depiction/imagery of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
apollo (god), sanctuary at delos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
apostle, paul Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
argentarius, m. Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
aristophanes Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 123
arma Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
belief, visual imagery as evidence Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
calliope, song of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 139
calliope Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
catalogue Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 109
commentary Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
custom Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
dance Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
delos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
divine being, athena Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
divine being, hephaestus Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
divine being, prometheus Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
divine being, zeus Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
doubt Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
emathides, subversive use of genre by Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 139
epic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
epos Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 48
erato Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
essence Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
ethnography Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
father, fatherhood Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 48
gigantomachy, artistic creativity and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 139
gigantomachy, emathides and subversion of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 139
gigantomachy, jupiter and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 139
gods and goddesses, depiction/imagery of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
greek Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
harmony Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
hesiod, the muses address' Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 73
hesiod, theogony Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
hesiod, works and days Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
hesiod Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
hinds, stephen Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 139
hymn Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 109
iapetus Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 172
jew(ish) Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
jupiter (zeus), gigantomachy and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 139
latium Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
leto (goddess) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
muses Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
myth/mythology, transmission Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
nature, natural phenomena, fire Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
nature, natural phenomena Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
noah Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 172
philosophy, pre-socratic Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
philosophy Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
poetic language, religious role of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
poetry/poetic performance, homeric hymn to apollo Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
pyreneus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 139
religion passim, myth Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
religion passim, origin of religion Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
religion passim, piety Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
religion passim, ritual, rite Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
religion passim, sacrifice Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
rosati, gianpiero Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 139
song Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
songs and music, construction of authority Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
songs and music, hymns Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
songs and music Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
theology Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
thessalonica Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
typhoeus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 139
uranus Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 109
vergil, aeneid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
versnel, hendrik s. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
wisdom, literature Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 31
zeus Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 172