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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6474
Hesiod, Theogony, 457


Ζῆνά τε μητιόεντα, θεῶν πατέρʼ ἠδὲ καὶ ἀνδρῶνHe kept his vow, continuing to reign


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

20 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 101-212, 42-100 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

100. Which brought the Death-Gods. Now in misery
2. Hesiod, Shield, 249-257, 248 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Hesiod, Theogony, 1001-1022, 123-236, 243, 245, 251, 254, 26, 262, 265-269, 27, 270-279, 28, 280-375, 380, 383-456, 458-469, 47, 470-541, 617-818, 820-923, 930-955, 961, 963, 965-1000 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1000. The loveliest tots in the whole company
4. Homer, Iliad, 13.355, 15.166, 15.186-15.193 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

13.355. /but Zeus was the elder born and the wiser. Therefore it was that Poseidon avoided to give open aid, but secretly sought ever to rouse the Argives throughout the host, in the likeness of a man. So these twain knotted the ends of the cords of mighty strife and evil war, and drew them taut over both armies 15.166. /for I avow me to be better far than he in might, and the elder born. Yet his heart counteth it but a little thing to declare himself the peer of me of whom even the other gods are adread. So spake he, and wind-footed, swift Iris failed not to hearken, but went down from the hills of Ida to sacred Ilios. 15.186. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.187. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.188. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.189. / Out upon it, verily strong though he be he hath spoken overweeningly, if in sooth by force and in mine own despite he will restrain me that am of like honour with himself. For three brethren are we, begotten of Cronos, and born of Rhea,—Zeus, and myself, and the third is Hades, that is lord of the dead below. And in three-fold wise are all things divided, and unto each hath been apportioned his own domain. 15.190. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.191. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.192. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet 15.193. /I verily, when the lots were shaken, won for my portion the grey sea to be my habitation for ever, and Hades won the murky darkness, while Zeus won the broad heaven amid the air and the clouds; but the earth and high Olympus remain yet common to us all. Wherefore will I not in any wise walk after the will of Zeus; nay in quiet
5. Homer, Odyssey, 8.279, 12.63, 12.65, 20.201-20.203, 24.518 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6. Pindar, Isthmian Odes, 6.8-6.9 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 7.54 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

503a. Call. This question of yours is not quite so simple; for there are some who have a regard for the citizens in the words that they utter, while there are also others of the sort that you mention. Soc. That is enough for me. For if this thing also is twofold, one part of it, I presume, will be flattery and a base mob-oratory, while the other is noble—the endeavor, that is, to make the citizens’ souls as good as possible, and the persistent effort to say what is best, whether it prove more or less pleasant to one’s hearers.
9. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

271a. Socrates. Then this is the goal of all his effort; he tries to produce conviction in the soul. Is not that so? Phaedrus. Yes. Socrates. So it is clear that Thrasymachus, or anyone else who seriously teaches the art of rhetoric, will first describe the soul with perfect accuracy and make us see whether it is one and all alike, or, like the body, of multiform aspect; for this is what we call explaining its nature. Phaedrus. Certainly. Socrates. And secondly he will say what its action is and toward what it is directed, or how it is acted upon and by what. Phaedrus. To be sure.
10. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Callimachus, Hymn To Jove Or Zeus, 17-29, 8-9, 16 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

12. Callimachus, Iambi, 13, 6, 1 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

13. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 5.46, 5.75.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.75.4.  As for Dionysus, the myths state that he discovered the vine and its cultivation, and also how to make wine and to store away many of the autumn fruits and thus to provide mankind with the use of them as food over a long time. This god was born in Crete, men say, of Zeus and Persephonê, and Orpheus has handed down the tradition in the initiatory rites that he was torn in pieces by the Titans. And the fact is that there have been several who bore the name Dionysus, regarding whom we have given a detailed account at greater length in connection with the more appropriate period of time.
14. Plutarch, On Isis And Osiris, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

35. That Osiris is identical with Dionysus who could more fittingly know than yourself, Clea ? For you are ii t the head of the inspired maidens of Delphi, and have been consecrated by your father and mother in the holy rites of Osiris. If, however, for the benefit of others it is needful to adduce proofs of this identity, let us leave undisturbed what may not be told, but the public ceremonies which the priests perform in the burial of the Apis, when they convey his body on an improvised bier, do not in any way come short of a Bacchic procession; for they fasten skins of fawns about themselves, and carry Bacchic wands and indulge in shoutings and movements exactly as do those who are under the spell of the Dionysiac ecstasies. Cf. Diodorus, i. 11. For the same reason many of the Greeks make statues of Dionysus in the form of a bull A partial list in Roscher, Lexikon d. gr. u. röm. Mythologie, i. 1149. ; and the women of Elis invoke him, praying that the god may come with the hoof of a bull Cf. Moralia, 299 a, where the invocation is given at greater length; also Edmonds, Lyra Graeca, iii. p. 510 (L.C.L.). ; and the epithet applied to Dionysus among the Argives is Son of the Bull. They call him up out of the water by the sound of trumpets, Cf. Moralia, 671 e. at the same time casting into the depths a lamb as an offering to the Keeper of the Gate. The trumpets they conceal in Bacchic wands, as Socrates Müller, Frag. Hist. Graec. iv. p. 498, Socrates, no. 5. has stated in his treatise on The Holy Ones. Furthermore, the tales regarding the Titans and the rites celebrated by night agree with the accounts of the dismemberment of Osiris and his revivification and regenesis. Similar agreement is found too in the tales about their sepulchres. The Egyptians, as has already been stated, 358 a and 359 a, supra . point out tombs of Osiris in many places, and the people of Delphi believe that the remains of Dionysus rest with them close beside the oracle; and the Holy Ones offer a secret sacrifice in the shrine of Apollo whenever the devotees of Dionysus That is, the inspired maidens, mentioned at the beginning of the chapter. wake the God of the Mystic Basket. Callimachus, Hymn to Demeter (vi.), 127; Anth. Pal. vi. 165; Virgil, Georg. i. 166. To show that the Greeks regard Dionysus as the lord and master not only of wine, but of the nature of every sort of moisture, it is enough that Pindar Frag. 153 (Christ). Plutarch quotes the line also in Moralia, 745 a and 757 f. be our witness, when he says May gladsome Dionysus swell the fruit upon the trees, The hallowed splendour of harvest-time. For this reason all who reverence Osiris are prohibited from destroying a cultivated tree or blocking up a spring of water. 35. That Osiris is identical with Dionysus who could more fittingly know than yourself, Clea? For you are at the head of the inspired maidens of Delphi, and have been consecrated by your father and mother in the holy rites of Osiris. If, however, for the benefit of others it is needful to adduce proofs of this identity, let us leave undisturbed what may not be told, but the public ceremonies which the priests perform in the burial of the Apis, when they convey his body on an improvised bier, do not in any way come short of a Bacchic procession; for they fasten skins of fawns about themselves, and carry Bacchic wands and indulge in shoutings and movements exactly as do those who are under the spell of the Dionysiac ecstasies. For the same reason many of the Greeks make statues of Dionysus in the form of a bull; and the women of Elis invoke him, praying that the god may come with the hoof of a bull; and the epithet applied to Dionysus among the Argives is "Son of the Bull." They call him up out of the water by the sound of trumpets, at the same time casting into the depths a lamb as an offering to the Keeper of the Gate. The trumpets they conceal in Bacchic wands, as Socrates has stated in his treatise on The Holy Ones. Furthermore, the tales regarding the Titans and the rites celebrated by night agree with the accounts of the dismemberment of Osiris and his revivification and regenesis. Similar agreement is found too in the tales about their sepulchres. The Egyptians, as has already been stated, point out tombs of Osiris in many places, and the people of Delphi believe that the remains of Dionysus rest with them close beside the oracle; and the Holy Ones offer a secret sacrifice in the shrine of Apollo whenever the devotees of Dionysus wake the God of the Mystic Basket. To show that the Greeks regard Dionysus as the lord and master not only of wine, but of the nature of every sort of moisture, it is enough that Pindar be our witness, when he says May gladsome Dionysus swell the fruit upon the trees, The hallowed splendour of harvest time. For this reason all who reverence Osiris are prohibited from destroying a cultivated tree or blocking up a spring of water.
15. Lucian, The Dance, 39 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.26.7, 4.27.10, 7.22.4, 9.1.8, 10.24.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.26.7. Having filled the lamp with oil, they wait until the same day next year, and the oil is sufficient for the lamp during the interval, although it is alight both day and night. The wick in it is of Carpasian flax, Probably asbestos. the only kind of flax which is fire-proof, and a bronze palm above the lamp reaches to the roof and draws off the smoke. The Callimachus who made the lamp, although not of the first rank of artists, was yet of unparalleled cleverness, so that he was the first to drill holes through stones, and gave himself the title of Refiner of Art, or perhaps others gave the title and he adopted it as his. 4.27.10. The Minyae, driven by the Thebans from Orchomenos after the battle of Leuctra, were restored to Boeotia by Philip the son of Amyntas, as were also the Plataeans. When Alexander had destroyed the city of the Thebans themselves, Cassander the son of Antipater rebuilt it after a few years. The exile of the Plataeans seems to have lasted the longest of those mentioned, but even this was not for more than two generations. 7.22.4. There is a similar method of divination practised at the sanctuary of Apis in Egypt . At Pharae there is also a water sacred to Hermes. The name of the spring is Hermes' stream, and the fish in it are not caught, being considered sacred to the god. Quite close to the image stand square stones, about thirty in number. These the people of Pharae adore, calling each by the name of some god. At a more remote period all the Greeks alike worshipped uncarved stones instead of images of the gods. 9.1.8. The second capture of Plataea occurred two years before the battle of Leuctra, 373 B.C when Asteius was Archon at Athens . The Thebans destroyed all the city except the sanctuaries, but the method of its capture saved the lives of all the Plataeans alike, and on their expulsion they were again received by the Athenians. When Philip after his victory at Chaeroneia introduced a garrison into Thebes, one of the means he employed to bring the Thebans low was to restore the Plataeans to their homes. 10.24.6. Leaving the temple and turning to the left you will come to an enclosure in which is the grave of Neoptolemus, the son of Achilles. Every year the Delphians sacrifice to him as to a hero. Ascending from the tomb you come to a stone of no large size. Over it every day they pour olive oil, and at each feast they place on it unworked wool. There is also an opinion about this stone, that it was given to Cronus instead of his child, and that Cronus vomited it up again.
17. Arnobius, Against The Gentiles, 5.19 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

18. Proclus, Hymni, 7.11-7.15 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

19. Olympiodorus The Younger of Alexandria, In Platonis Gorgiam Commentaria, 1.13, 46.6 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)

20. Anon, Anonymous Prolegomena To Plato'S Philosophy, 15.7



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abel Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326
absence Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
aetiological aspects, structure of Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 456
aetiology, callimachus and Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 456
aetiology Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
alexander the great Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
alexandria Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
amalthea Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 23
aphrodite Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 186
aphrodite (goddess, aka mylitta, ailat, mitra) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 377
arcadia Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
athena, polias Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
athena Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13; Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 186
authority, textual Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169
baal (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 377
basileia (alexandria) Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
berenice i Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
birth of zeus Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 46
boeotia Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
bremmer, jan n. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 377
brown, john p. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 377
burkert, walter Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 377
cain Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326
callicles Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169
callimachus, and aetiology Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 456
callimachus, on kings and kingship Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
callimachus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
catalogue of women (hesiod) Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 200
christianity Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326
communication, tailored to the audience Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169
cosmological theogony, technological framework of Bartninkas, Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy (2023) 33
cosmopolitanism Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
cosmos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
cretan tales Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
crete Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 23
cronus Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13
daidala Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
death and the afterlife, hades (underworld) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 377
deification Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
demeter Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13
demiurge, the, as a father Bartninkas, Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy (2023) 33
demonstration Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169
dionysus, heart of Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 199
egypt Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
emotions, anger/rage de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153
emotions, love/passion de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153
epigrams, on pillar of ptolemagrius (panopolis) Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
epos Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 46
erinyes Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 39; Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 186
eurydice (wife of ptolemy i soter) Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
exegesis, allegorical Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169
facture Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 186
fates Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 39
father, fatherhood Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 46
fertility Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13
fire Pachoumi, Conceptualising Divine Unions in the Greek and Near Eastern Worlds (2022) 128
gaia Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 23
gaia (earth) Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13
gifts Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
goddesses Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13
gods, lists of Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 200
gods Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 39
gods and goddesses, origins Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 377
gods and goddesses, pantheon Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 377
graces Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 456
hades Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13; Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169
hebrews Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326
helicon Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
hera, birth Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 23
hera, nympheuomene Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
hera, statue Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
hera, teleia Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
hera Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13
heracles Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13
heraion, argos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
herakles (god/mythological hero) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 377
hesiod, theogony Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 39
hesiod Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188; Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 200; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153
hestia Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13
homer, iliad Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 200
homer Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169; Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 200
hymn '1 to zeus, and influence of hesiod" Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 456
hymn '1 to zeus, and kingship ideology" Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
hymn 6 to demeter, kingship ideology Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
hymn to the muses, influence Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 456
hymn to the muses, theogony Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 456
hymns Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
iambus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
imagination (φαντασία) Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169
immortality Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
intertextuality, of hesiod and callimachus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 456
intertextuality Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
judaism Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326
judgement, post-mortem Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169
juno Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 23
jupiter Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 23
ker Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 39
kingship ideology Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
kore (persephone) Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13
kronos Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 23, 106; Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 186
lane fox, robin Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 377
leaving the city, as a metaliterary metaphor Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
legitimation/legitimacy Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
magas Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
marriage, zeus and hera Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 23, 106
memory Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
mesopotamian culture and religion Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 377
moirai Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 39
monsters Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 377
moros Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 39
motherhood Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13
muses Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 456
mysteries, phlyan Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 199
myth, and logos Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169
myth, true Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169
myth/mythology, origin of the gods Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 377
myth Pachoumi, Conceptualising Divine Unions in the Greek and Near Eastern Worlds (2022) 128
narratology, affective/cognitive de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153
night/nighttime, as mother Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 39
night/nighttime, children of Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 39
numbers Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 200
nurse Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 23
oedipus Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
olympia Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
opinion (belief) Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169
ouranos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 23; Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 186
panchaea Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
pandora, fabrication of Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 186
pandora Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 186
panhellenism Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
phaeacians' Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 46
philotês Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 39
phoenicia Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326
physical allegory Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
pieria of myus, pillar of ptolemagrius (panopolis), epigrams on Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
plataia, city Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
poetic etymology Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
poetry, other poetic voices in Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 456
political geography Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
poseidon, xi Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13
poseidon Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169
praxiteles Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
procession Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
prometheus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153
prophecy Pachoumi, Conceptualising Divine Unions in the Greek and Near Eastern Worlds (2022) 128
ptolemy ceraunus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
ptolemy i soter, death of Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
ptolemy i soter Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
ptolemy ii philadelphus, accession to coregency Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
ptolemy ii philadelphus, accession to sole rule Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
punishment Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169
real world\n, (of) names Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 200
real world\n, (of/on/generating new) lists Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 200
religion Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13; Pachoumi, Conceptualising Divine Unions in the Greek and Near Eastern Worlds (2022) 128
rhea Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 23, 106
rose, h. j. Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 199
royal ideology Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
sacred history, euhemerus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
sacrifices Pachoumi, Conceptualising Divine Unions in the Greek and Near Eastern Worlds (2022) 128
saturn Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 23
secret Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 23
socrates Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169
sovereignty Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 23, 106
subterfuge Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
symposium, in hymn 1 to zeus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
tartarus Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169
telchines, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188
thebes Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
trick Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
uranus Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13
voices, callimachus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 456
west, martin l. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 377
wife, hera as Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13
womb' "458.0_13.0@'house' (oikos), hestia and" Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 23
zeus, birth Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 23
zeus, child Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 106
zeus, gestates dionysus in his thigh Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 199
zeus, in hymns Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183
zeus Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 13; Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 169; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 188; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 326; Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 186; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153
zeus (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 377
zeus basileus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 183