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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6474
Hesiod, Theogony, 23-35


ἄρνας ποιμαίνονθʼ Ἑλικῶνος ὕπο ζαθέοιο.That lives forever. Hesiod was taught


τόνδε δέ με πρώτιστα θεαὶ πρὸς μῦθον ἔειπονBy them to sing adeptly as he brought


Μοῦσαι Ὀλυμπιάδες, κοῦραι Διὸς αἰγιόχοιο·His sheep to pasture underneath the gaze


ποιμένες ἄγραυλοι, κάκʼ ἐλέγχεα, γαστέρες οἶονOf Helicon, and in those early day


ἴδμεν ψεύδεα πολλὰ λέγειν ἐτύμοισιν ὁμοῖαThose daughters of Lord Zeus proclaimed to me:


ἴδμεν δʼ, εὖτʼ ἐθέλωμεν, ἀληθέα γηρύσασθαι.“You who tend sheep, full of iniquity


ὣς ἔφασαν κοῦραι μεγάλου Διὸς ἀρτιέπειαι·Mere wretched bellies, we know how to tell


καί μοι σκῆπτρον ἔδον δάφνης ἐριθηλέος ὄζονFalse things that yet seem true, but we know well


δρέψασαι, θηητόν· ἐνέπνευσαν δέ μοι αὐδὴνHow to speak truth at will.” Thus fluidly


θέσπιν, ἵνα κλείοιμι τά τʼ ἐσσόμενα πρό τʼ ἐόντα.Spoke Zeus’s daughters. Then they gave to me


καί μʼ ἐκέλονθʼ ὑμνεῖν μακάρων γένος αἰὲν ἐόντωνA sturdy laurel shoot, plucked from the ground


σφᾶς δʼ αὐτὰς πρῶτόν τε καὶ ὕστατον αἰὲν ἀείδειν.A wondrous thing, and breathed a sacred sound


ἀλλὰ τί ἦ μοι ταῦτα περὶ δρῦν ἢ περὶ πέτρην;Into my throat that I may eulogize


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

26 results
1. Archilochus, Fragments, 3 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Archilochus, Fragments, 3 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Hesiod, Works And Days, 10-12, 164-165, 2, 232-233, 26, 3-5, 509-511, 6, 618-694, 7-8, 822-828, 9, 1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1. Pierian Muses, with your songs of praise
4. Hesiod, Theogony, 10, 100-109, 11, 110-115, 12, 120, 13-19, 2, 20-22, 24-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-59, 6, 60-69, 7, 70-74, 748-749, 75, 750-754, 76-78, 782-789, 79, 790-799, 8, 80, 800-806, 81-89, 9, 90-99, 1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1. From the Heliconian Muses let me sing:
5. Homer, Iliad, 2.91-2.92, 2.484-2.492, 7.230, 9.502-9.514, 16.34-16.35, 19.163-19.202, 24.601-24.620 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.91. /even so from the ships and huts before the low sea-beach marched forth in companies their many tribes to the place of gathering. And in their midst blazed forth Rumour, messenger of Zeus, urging them to go; and they were gathered. 2.92. /even so from the ships and huts before the low sea-beach marched forth in companies their many tribes to the place of gathering. And in their midst blazed forth Rumour, messenger of Zeus, urging them to go; and they were gathered. 2.484. /Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— 2.485. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.486. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.487. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.488. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.489. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.490. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.491. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.492. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 9.502. /and libations and the savour of sacrifice do men turn from wrath with supplication, whenso any man transgresseth and doeth sin. For Prayers are the daughters of great Zeus, halting and wrinkled and of eyes askance, and they are ever mindful to follow in the steps of Sin. 9.503. /and libations and the savour of sacrifice do men turn from wrath with supplication, whenso any man transgresseth and doeth sin. For Prayers are the daughters of great Zeus, halting and wrinkled and of eyes askance, and they are ever mindful to follow in the steps of Sin. 9.504. /and libations and the savour of sacrifice do men turn from wrath with supplication, whenso any man transgresseth and doeth sin. For Prayers are the daughters of great Zeus, halting and wrinkled and of eyes askance, and they are ever mindful to follow in the steps of Sin. 9.505. /Howbeit Sin is strong and fleet of foot, wherefore she far out-runneth them all, and goeth before them over the face of all the earth making men to fall, and Prayers follow after, seeking to heal the hurt. Now whoso revereth the daughters of Zeus when they draw nigh, him they greatly bless, and hear him, when he prayeth; 9.506. /Howbeit Sin is strong and fleet of foot, wherefore she far out-runneth them all, and goeth before them over the face of all the earth making men to fall, and Prayers follow after, seeking to heal the hurt. Now whoso revereth the daughters of Zeus when they draw nigh, him they greatly bless, and hear him, when he prayeth; 9.507. /Howbeit Sin is strong and fleet of foot, wherefore she far out-runneth them all, and goeth before them over the face of all the earth making men to fall, and Prayers follow after, seeking to heal the hurt. Now whoso revereth the daughters of Zeus when they draw nigh, him they greatly bless, and hear him, when he prayeth; 9.508. /Howbeit Sin is strong and fleet of foot, wherefore she far out-runneth them all, and goeth before them over the face of all the earth making men to fall, and Prayers follow after, seeking to heal the hurt. Now whoso revereth the daughters of Zeus when they draw nigh, him they greatly bless, and hear him, when he prayeth; 9.509. /Howbeit Sin is strong and fleet of foot, wherefore she far out-runneth them all, and goeth before them over the face of all the earth making men to fall, and Prayers follow after, seeking to heal the hurt. Now whoso revereth the daughters of Zeus when they draw nigh, him they greatly bless, and hear him, when he prayeth; 9.510. /but if a man denieth them and stubbornly refuseth, then they go their way and make prayer to Zeus, son of Cronos, that Ate may follow after such a one to the end that he may fall and pay full atonement. Nay, Achilles, see thou too that reverence attend upon the daughters of Zeus, even such as bendeth the hearts of all men that are upright. 9.511. /but if a man denieth them and stubbornly refuseth, then they go their way and make prayer to Zeus, son of Cronos, that Ate may follow after such a one to the end that he may fall and pay full atonement. Nay, Achilles, see thou too that reverence attend upon the daughters of Zeus, even such as bendeth the hearts of all men that are upright. 9.512. /but if a man denieth them and stubbornly refuseth, then they go their way and make prayer to Zeus, son of Cronos, that Ate may follow after such a one to the end that he may fall and pay full atonement. Nay, Achilles, see thou too that reverence attend upon the daughters of Zeus, even such as bendeth the hearts of all men that are upright. 9.513. /but if a man denieth them and stubbornly refuseth, then they go their way and make prayer to Zeus, son of Cronos, that Ate may follow after such a one to the end that he may fall and pay full atonement. Nay, Achilles, see thou too that reverence attend upon the daughters of Zeus, even such as bendeth the hearts of all men that are upright. 9.514. /but if a man denieth them and stubbornly refuseth, then they go their way and make prayer to Zeus, son of Cronos, that Ate may follow after such a one to the end that he may fall and pay full atonement. Nay, Achilles, see thou too that reverence attend upon the daughters of Zeus, even such as bendeth the hearts of all men that are upright. 16.34. /Never upon me let such wrath lay hold, as that thou dost cherish, O thou whose valour is but a bane! Wherein shall any other even yet to be born have profit of thee, if thou ward not off shameful ruin from the Argives? Pitiless one, thy father, meseems, was not the knight Peleus, nor was Thetis thy mother, but the grey sea bare thee 16.35. /and the beetling cliffs, for that thy heart is unbending. But if in thy mind thou art shunning some oracle, and thy queenly mother hath declared to thee aught from Zeus, yet me at least send thou forth speedily, and with me let the rest of the host of the Myrmidons follow, if so be I may prove a light of deliverance to the Danaans. 19.163. /But bid thou the Achaeans by their swift ships to taste of food and wine; since therein is courage and strength. For there is no man that shall be able the whole day long until set of sun to fight against the foe, fasting the while from food; for though in his heart he be eager for battle 19.164. /But bid thou the Achaeans by their swift ships to taste of food and wine; since therein is courage and strength. For there is no man that shall be able the whole day long until set of sun to fight against the foe, fasting the while from food; for though in his heart he be eager for battle 19.165. /yet his limbs wax heavy unawares and thirst cometh upon him and hunger withal, and his knees grow weary as he goeth. But whoso, having had his fill of wine and food, fighteth the whole day long against the foemen, lo, his heart within him is of good cheer, and his limbs wax not weary 19.166. /yet his limbs wax heavy unawares and thirst cometh upon him and hunger withal, and his knees grow weary as he goeth. But whoso, having had his fill of wine and food, fighteth the whole day long against the foemen, lo, his heart within him is of good cheer, and his limbs wax not weary 19.167. /yet his limbs wax heavy unawares and thirst cometh upon him and hunger withal, and his knees grow weary as he goeth. But whoso, having had his fill of wine and food, fighteth the whole day long against the foemen, lo, his heart within him is of good cheer, and his limbs wax not weary 19.168. /yet his limbs wax heavy unawares and thirst cometh upon him and hunger withal, and his knees grow weary as he goeth. But whoso, having had his fill of wine and food, fighteth the whole day long against the foemen, lo, his heart within him is of good cheer, and his limbs wax not weary 19.169. /yet his limbs wax heavy unawares and thirst cometh upon him and hunger withal, and his knees grow weary as he goeth. But whoso, having had his fill of wine and food, fighteth the whole day long against the foemen, lo, his heart within him is of good cheer, and his limbs wax not weary 19.170. /until all withdraw them from battle. Come then, dismiss thou the host, and bid them make ready their meal. And as touching the gifts, let Agamemnon, king of men, bring them forth into the midst of the place of gathering, that all the Achaeans may behold them with their eyes, and thou be made glad at heart. And let him rise up in the midst of the Argives 19.171. /until all withdraw them from battle. Come then, dismiss thou the host, and bid them make ready their meal. And as touching the gifts, let Agamemnon, king of men, bring them forth into the midst of the place of gathering, that all the Achaeans may behold them with their eyes, and thou be made glad at heart. And let him rise up in the midst of the Argives 19.172. /until all withdraw them from battle. Come then, dismiss thou the host, and bid them make ready their meal. And as touching the gifts, let Agamemnon, king of men, bring them forth into the midst of the place of gathering, that all the Achaeans may behold them with their eyes, and thou be made glad at heart. And let him rise up in the midst of the Argives 19.173. /until all withdraw them from battle. Come then, dismiss thou the host, and bid them make ready their meal. And as touching the gifts, let Agamemnon, king of men, bring them forth into the midst of the place of gathering, that all the Achaeans may behold them with their eyes, and thou be made glad at heart. And let him rise up in the midst of the Argives 19.174. /until all withdraw them from battle. Come then, dismiss thou the host, and bid them make ready their meal. And as touching the gifts, let Agamemnon, king of men, bring them forth into the midst of the place of gathering, that all the Achaeans may behold them with their eyes, and thou be made glad at heart. And let him rise up in the midst of the Argives 19.175. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.176. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.177. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.178. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.179. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.180. /that thou mayest have nothing lacking of thy due. Son of Atreus, towards others also shalt thou be more righteous hereafter; for in no wise is it blame for a king to make amends to another, if so be he wax wroth without a cause. 19.181. /that thou mayest have nothing lacking of thy due. Son of Atreus, towards others also shalt thou be more righteous hereafter; for in no wise is it blame for a king to make amends to another, if so be he wax wroth without a cause. 19.182. /that thou mayest have nothing lacking of thy due. Son of Atreus, towards others also shalt thou be more righteous hereafter; for in no wise is it blame for a king to make amends to another, if so be he wax wroth without a cause. 19.183. /that thou mayest have nothing lacking of thy due. Son of Atreus, towards others also shalt thou be more righteous hereafter; for in no wise is it blame for a king to make amends to another, if so be he wax wroth without a cause. 19.184. /that thou mayest have nothing lacking of thy due. Son of Atreus, towards others also shalt thou be more righteous hereafter; for in no wise is it blame for a king to make amends to another, if so be he wax wroth without a cause. To him then spake again the king of men, Agamemnon: 19.185. / Glad am I, son of Laertes, to hear thy words, for duly hast thou set forth the whole matter, an told the tale thereof. This oath am I ready to swear, and my heart biddeth me thereto, nor shall I forswear myself before the god. But let Achilles abide here the while, eager though he be for war 19.186. / Glad am I, son of Laertes, to hear thy words, for duly hast thou set forth the whole matter, an told the tale thereof. This oath am I ready to swear, and my heart biddeth me thereto, nor shall I forswear myself before the god. But let Achilles abide here the while, eager though he be for war 19.187. / Glad am I, son of Laertes, to hear thy words, for duly hast thou set forth the whole matter, an told the tale thereof. This oath am I ready to swear, and my heart biddeth me thereto, nor shall I forswear myself before the god. But let Achilles abide here the while, eager though he be for war 19.188. / Glad am I, son of Laertes, to hear thy words, for duly hast thou set forth the whole matter, an told the tale thereof. This oath am I ready to swear, and my heart biddeth me thereto, nor shall I forswear myself before the god. But let Achilles abide here the while, eager though he be for war 19.189. / Glad am I, son of Laertes, to hear thy words, for duly hast thou set forth the whole matter, an told the tale thereof. This oath am I ready to swear, and my heart biddeth me thereto, nor shall I forswear myself before the god. But let Achilles abide here the while, eager though he be for war 19.190. /and abide all ye others together, until the gifts be brought from my hut, and we make oaths of faith with sacrifice. And to thine own self do I thus give charge and commandment: Choose thee young men, princes of the host of the Achaeans, and bear from my ship the gifts 19.191. /and abide all ye others together, until the gifts be brought from my hut, and we make oaths of faith with sacrifice. And to thine own self do I thus give charge and commandment: Choose thee young men, princes of the host of the Achaeans, and bear from my ship the gifts 19.192. /and abide all ye others together, until the gifts be brought from my hut, and we make oaths of faith with sacrifice. And to thine own self do I thus give charge and commandment: Choose thee young men, princes of the host of the Achaeans, and bear from my ship the gifts 19.193. /and abide all ye others together, until the gifts be brought from my hut, and we make oaths of faith with sacrifice. And to thine own self do I thus give charge and commandment: Choose thee young men, princes of the host of the Achaeans, and bear from my ship the gifts 19.194. /and abide all ye others together, until the gifts be brought from my hut, and we make oaths of faith with sacrifice. And to thine own self do I thus give charge and commandment: Choose thee young men, princes of the host of the Achaeans, and bear from my ship the gifts 19.195. /even all that we promised yesternight to give Achilles, and bring the women withal. And let Talthybius forthwith make me ready a boar in the midst of the wide camp of the Achaeans, to sacrifice to Zeus and to the Sun. But swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 19.196. /even all that we promised yesternight to give Achilles, and bring the women withal. And let Talthybius forthwith make me ready a boar in the midst of the wide camp of the Achaeans, to sacrifice to Zeus and to the Sun. But swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 19.197. /even all that we promised yesternight to give Achilles, and bring the women withal. And let Talthybius forthwith make me ready a boar in the midst of the wide camp of the Achaeans, to sacrifice to Zeus and to the Sun. But swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 19.198. /even all that we promised yesternight to give Achilles, and bring the women withal. And let Talthybius forthwith make me ready a boar in the midst of the wide camp of the Achaeans, to sacrifice to Zeus and to the Sun. But swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 19.199. /even all that we promised yesternight to give Achilles, and bring the women withal. And let Talthybius forthwith make me ready a boar in the midst of the wide camp of the Achaeans, to sacrifice to Zeus and to the Sun. But swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 19.200. /at some other time were it e'en better that ye be busied thus, when haply there shall come between some pause in war, and the fury in my breast be not so great. Now are they lying mangled, they that Hector, son of Priam, slew, Zeus vouch-safed him glory 19.201. /at some other time were it e'en better that ye be busied thus, when haply there shall come between some pause in war, and the fury in my breast be not so great. Now are they lying mangled, they that Hector, son of Priam, slew, Zeus vouch-safed him glory 19.202. /at some other time were it e'en better that ye be busied thus, when haply there shall come between some pause in war, and the fury in my breast be not so great. Now are they lying mangled, they that Hector, son of Priam, slew, Zeus vouch-safed him glory 24.601. /and lieth upon a bier; and at break of day thou shalt thyself behold him, as thou bearest him hence; but for this present let us bethink us of supper. For even the fair-haired Niobe bethought her of meat, albeit twelve children perished in her halls, six daughters and six lusty sons. 24.602. /and lieth upon a bier; and at break of day thou shalt thyself behold him, as thou bearest him hence; but for this present let us bethink us of supper. For even the fair-haired Niobe bethought her of meat, albeit twelve children perished in her halls, six daughters and six lusty sons. 24.603. /and lieth upon a bier; and at break of day thou shalt thyself behold him, as thou bearest him hence; but for this present let us bethink us of supper. For even the fair-haired Niobe bethought her of meat, albeit twelve children perished in her halls, six daughters and six lusty sons. 24.604. /and lieth upon a bier; and at break of day thou shalt thyself behold him, as thou bearest him hence; but for this present let us bethink us of supper. For even the fair-haired Niobe bethought her of meat, albeit twelve children perished in her halls, six daughters and six lusty sons. 24.605. /The sons Apollo slew with shafts from his silver bow, being wroth against Niobe, and the daughters the archer Artemis, for that Niobe had matched her with fair-cheeked Leto, saying that the goddess had borne but twain, while herself was mother to many; wherefore they, for all they were but twain, destroyed them all. 24.606. /The sons Apollo slew with shafts from his silver bow, being wroth against Niobe, and the daughters the archer Artemis, for that Niobe had matched her with fair-cheeked Leto, saying that the goddess had borne but twain, while herself was mother to many; wherefore they, for all they were but twain, destroyed them all. 24.607. /The sons Apollo slew with shafts from his silver bow, being wroth against Niobe, and the daughters the archer Artemis, for that Niobe had matched her with fair-cheeked Leto, saying that the goddess had borne but twain, while herself was mother to many; wherefore they, for all they were but twain, destroyed them all. 24.608. /The sons Apollo slew with shafts from his silver bow, being wroth against Niobe, and the daughters the archer Artemis, for that Niobe had matched her with fair-cheeked Leto, saying that the goddess had borne but twain, while herself was mother to many; wherefore they, for all they were but twain, destroyed them all. 24.609. /The sons Apollo slew with shafts from his silver bow, being wroth against Niobe, and the daughters the archer Artemis, for that Niobe had matched her with fair-cheeked Leto, saying that the goddess had borne but twain, while herself was mother to many; wherefore they, for all they were but twain, destroyed them all. 24.610. /For nine days' space they lay in their blood, nor was there any to bury them, for the son of Cronos turned the folk to stones; howbeit on the tenth day the gods of heaven buried them; and Niobe bethought her of meat, for she was wearied with the shedding of tears. And now somewhere amid the rocks, on the lonely mountains 24.611. /For nine days' space they lay in their blood, nor was there any to bury them, for the son of Cronos turned the folk to stones; howbeit on the tenth day the gods of heaven buried them; and Niobe bethought her of meat, for she was wearied with the shedding of tears. And now somewhere amid the rocks, on the lonely mountains 24.612. /For nine days' space they lay in their blood, nor was there any to bury them, for the son of Cronos turned the folk to stones; howbeit on the tenth day the gods of heaven buried them; and Niobe bethought her of meat, for she was wearied with the shedding of tears. And now somewhere amid the rocks, on the lonely mountains 24.613. /For nine days' space they lay in their blood, nor was there any to bury them, for the son of Cronos turned the folk to stones; howbeit on the tenth day the gods of heaven buried them; and Niobe bethought her of meat, for she was wearied with the shedding of tears. And now somewhere amid the rocks, on the lonely mountains 24.614. /For nine days' space they lay in their blood, nor was there any to bury them, for the son of Cronos turned the folk to stones; howbeit on the tenth day the gods of heaven buried them; and Niobe bethought her of meat, for she was wearied with the shedding of tears. And now somewhere amid the rocks, on the lonely mountains 24.615. /on Sipylus, where, men say, are the couching-places of goddesses, even of the nymphs that range swiftly in the dance about Achelous, there, albeit a stone, she broodeth over her woes sent by the gods. But come, let us twain likewise, noble old sire, bethink us of meat; and thereafter shalt thou make lament over thy dear son 24.616. /on Sipylus, where, men say, are the couching-places of goddesses, even of the nymphs that range swiftly in the dance about Achelous, there, albeit a stone, she broodeth over her woes sent by the gods. But come, let us twain likewise, noble old sire, bethink us of meat; and thereafter shalt thou make lament over thy dear son 24.617. /on Sipylus, where, men say, are the couching-places of goddesses, even of the nymphs that range swiftly in the dance about Achelous, there, albeit a stone, she broodeth over her woes sent by the gods. But come, let us twain likewise, noble old sire, bethink us of meat; and thereafter shalt thou make lament over thy dear son 24.618. /on Sipylus, where, men say, are the couching-places of goddesses, even of the nymphs that range swiftly in the dance about Achelous, there, albeit a stone, she broodeth over her woes sent by the gods. But come, let us twain likewise, noble old sire, bethink us of meat; and thereafter shalt thou make lament over thy dear son 24.619. /on Sipylus, where, men say, are the couching-places of goddesses, even of the nymphs that range swiftly in the dance about Achelous, there, albeit a stone, she broodeth over her woes sent by the gods. But come, let us twain likewise, noble old sire, bethink us of meat; and thereafter shalt thou make lament over thy dear son 24.620. /when thou hast borne him into Ilios; mourned shall he be of thee many tears. Therewith swift Achilles sprang up, and slew a white-fleeced sheep, and his comrades flayed it and made it ready well and duly, and sliced it cunningly and spitted the morsels, and roasted them carefully and drew all off the spits.
6. Homer, Odyssey, 1.351-1.352, 5.313-5.379, 5.383, 5.394-5.399, 5.423, 8.550-8.554, 19.163-19.203, 19.225-19.235, 19.239-19.240, 19.263-19.264, 19.272, 19.275, 19.282-19.303, 19.306, 19.572-19.581, 22.347 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

7. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 156-166, 149 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

149. Shall be esteemed. To men I shall declare
8. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 8.20-8.21 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 3.4-3.5, 9.47-9.48 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Aristophanes, Clouds, 546, 545 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

545. κἀγὼ μὲν τοιοῦτος ἀνὴρ ὢν ποιητὴς οὐ κομῶ
14. Aristophanes, Wasps, 1052, 1051 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1051. ἀλλὰ τὸ λοιπὸν τῶν ποιητῶν
15. Empedocles, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

39d. men whom I restrained, though you knew it not; and they will be harsher, inasmuch as they are younger, and you will be more annoyed. For if you think that by putting men to death you will prevent anyone from reproaching you because you do not act as you should, you are mistaken. That mode of escape is neither possible at all nor honorable, but the easiest and most honorable escape is not by suppressing others, but by making yourselves as good as possible. So with this prophecy to you who condemned me
17. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

275b. to know many things, when they are for the most part ignorant and hard to get along with, since they are not wise, but only appear wise. Phaedrus. Socrates, you easily make up stories of Egypt or any country you please. Socrates. They used to say, my friend, that the words of the oak in the holy place of Zeus at Dodona were the first prophetic utterances. The people of that time, not being so wise as you young folks, were content in their simplicity to hear an oak
18. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

19. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.15.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.15.3. The nearest approach to a coalition took place in the old war between Chalcis and Eretria ; this was a quarrel in which the rest of the Hellenic name did to some extent take sides.
20. Callimachus, Aetia, None (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

21. Callimachus, Iambi, 13 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

22. Theocritus, Idylls, 3.2 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

23. Horace, Odes, 3.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.4. he found no one but Vespasian equal to the task, and able to undergo the great burden of so mighty a war, seeing he was growing an old man already in the camp, and from his youth had been exercised in warlike exploits: he was also a man that had long ago pacified the west, and made it subject to the Romans, when it had been put into disorder by the Germans; he had also recovered to them Britain by his arms 3.4. “Thou, O Vespasian, thinkest no more than that thou hast taken Josephus himself captive; but I come to thee as a messenger of greater tidings; for had not I been sent by God to thee, I knew what was the law of the Jews in this case? and how it becomes generals to die. 3.4. its length is also from Meloth to Thella, a village near to Jordan.
24. Vergil, Aeneis, 5.592-5.593, 7.37-7.45, 7.803-7.805 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.592. rushed fiercer to the fight, his strength now roused 5.593. by rage, while shame and courage confident 7.37. Then, gazing from the deep, Aeneas saw 7.38. a stretch of groves, whence Tiber 's smiling stream 7.39. its tumbling current rich with yellow sands 7.40. burst seaward forth: around it and above 7.41. hore-haunting birds of varied voice and plume 7.42. flattered the sky with song, and, circling far 7.43. o'er river-bed and grove, took joyful wing. 7.44. Thither to landward now his ships he steered 7.803. our banners Iost. Twin Gates of War there be 7.804. of fearful name, to Mars' fierce godhead vowed: 7.805. a hundred brass bars shut them, and the strength
25. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 42.181 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

26. Quintus Smyrnaeus, Posthomerica, 12.306-12.313



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64
achilles (mythological hero) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 160
aeneas Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
aesop Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 541
aethalides Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 9
aetia, books 1 and 2, muses in Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 333
aetiological aspects, structure of Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 455
aetiology, callimachus and Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 455
agricultural calendar Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 87
alcaeus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 216
alcman Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 9
alexandrian Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 35
alexandrian literature Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209
allusion, togigantomachy Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
altars on mountain summits Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 27, 28
amphidamas, funeral games of Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 49
anankê/anankê Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 308
antinous Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64
aphrodite Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 216
apollo (god), depiction/imagery of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
apollo (god), sanctuary at delos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
archilochus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 217; Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 58
argentarius, m. Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
aristophanes Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 58
aristotle, on the objects of memory Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 239
arma Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
artemis Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 34
asclepiades Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 214
askra (ascra) Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 27
augustine Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 239
augustus, jupiter linked to Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
aulis Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 87
autobiography Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 87, 119
belief, visual imagery as evidence Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
black sea, landscape Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 27
bucolic, agricultural systems Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 457
bucolic, agricultural vs. bucolic space in Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 457
bucolic, pastores (herdsmen) in Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 117
bucolic, space Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 457
bär, silvio Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 159
callimachus, and aetiology Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 455
callimachus, and hesiod Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 159
callimachus, and the muses Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 333
callimachus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 216, 217; Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 541; Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 35
callimachus (narrator) Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 333
calliope, gigantomachy and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
calliope, in horace Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
calliope Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
cameron, alan Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 159, 169
camilla Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 117
catalogue Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 34
chalcis Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 87
comatas Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 214
commentary Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
competition Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 58
conte, gian biagio Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 159
contests, athletic Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64
contests, poetic Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 87, 214, 216, 217
contingency Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 87
cos Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 214, 216, 217
cretan tales Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 66
daimôn Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 39, 295, 308
damoetas Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 214
dance Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
daphnis Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 214
de re rustica (varro), use of greek sources in Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 117
delos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
demeter Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 541
dicaearchus Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 117
didactic poetry Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 87, 294, 308
dionysos (bacchus, god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 160
dream Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 35
earth/earth/gaea Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 294
egotism Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 58
encomium Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
epic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
epic (poetry) Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 120
epic narrative Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 160
epic tradition Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 34
epiphany Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 27, 28
erato Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
erebus Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 294
eris/eris/strife/strife Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 119
eros Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 39; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 214, 216, 217
essence Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
euripides Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 58
euripus, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 87
faustulus Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 117
festivals Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 28
food Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64, 87
ford, andrew Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 160
galatea Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 217
genealogy Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 119
genre Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 87, 308
gigantomachy, as poetic theme Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
gigantomachy, in horace Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
gigantomachy, jupiter and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
gods Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 58
gods and goddesses, depiction/imagery of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
graces Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 455
hardie, philip Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
harmony Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195; Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 308
helicon Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 120; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64; Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 541; Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 34
hero/heroism Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 34, 35
herodotean life of homer, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 87
heroes, race of, in hesiod Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 49
hesiod, at funeral games for amphidamas Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 49
hesiod, muses Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 169
hesiod, myth of the races in Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 49
hesiod, on zeus Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 61
hesiod, the muses address' Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 61
hesiod, theogony Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87, 160; Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209
hesiod, works and days Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
hesiod Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87; Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64, 65, 66, 87, 216, 217; Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 27, 28; Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 541; Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 58; Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 34, 35; Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 49
hexameter Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209
hexameter (poetry) Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 39, 87, 124, 294
hippokrene (hippocrene) spring Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 27
homer, iliad Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 160
homer, odyssey Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 160
homer Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64, 65, 66, 87, 214; Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209; Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 58; Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 117
hubris, general human-environment relations Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 27
hunger Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64
hymn to the muses, influence Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 455
hymn to the muses, theogony Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 333
hymns Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 87
iambus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 216, 217
in-proem Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 34, 35
india Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209
initiation Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 87
inspiration Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 308; Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 34
intertextuality, of hesiod and callimachus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 455
intertextuality Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64, 216; Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 35
jewish literature Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209
jupiter (zeus), augustus linked to Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
jupiter (zeus), gigantomachy and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
justice Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64, 65, 66, 87
lamberton, robert Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 160
latium Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
law Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 308
leaving the city, as a metaliterary metaphor Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 214, 216, 217
lesbos Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 216
leto (goddess) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
love/philotês (in empedocles) Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 295, 308
lycidas Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 214, 216, 217; Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 541
lying Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209
lyric Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 216
maciver, calum Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 159
melantheus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64
mimesis Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 214, 216, 217
mount helikon (helicon) Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 27, 28
mount olympus Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 27
mountains, and the divine Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 27, 28
mouseia Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 28
muse, invocation Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 66
muse Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 34, 35
muses, aetia (callimachus) Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 159
muses, callimachus and Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 333
muses, in hesiod Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
muses, in horace Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
muses, proem Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 159
muses, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64, 65, 66
muses, theogony (hesiod) Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 169
muses Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 455; Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 169; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127; Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209; Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 27, 28; Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 541; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209; Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 58
muses (goddesses) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 160
music Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 58
myth/mythology, transmission Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87, 160
myth Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 27, 28
mytilene Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 216, 217
neikos/strife Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 39, 295, 308
night Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 39, 124
noah Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209
nonnus, dionysiaca Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209
nymphs, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 216
oath/oath Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 39
odysseus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64, 65, 66
ohara, james Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
olympus Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 295, 308
opposites (pair of) Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 39
oracles Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209
pan Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 216
pastoral activity Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 28
pastures Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 117
patroclus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64
penelope Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64, 65, 66
perses Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 119; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 87
perseus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
philitas Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 214
pindar Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 58
piraeus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 217
plato Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 66, 217; Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 541; Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 117
plausible lie Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64, 65, 66
poetic/musical inspiration Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 27, 28
poetic language, religious role of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
poetic patronage Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 214, 216, 217
poetics Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 34
poetry, and aesthetic pleasure Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 214, 216, 217
poetry, and aristocratic power Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64, 65, 66, 87
poetry, other poetic voices in Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 455
poetry/poetic performance, homeric hymn to apollo Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
poetry Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 58
poets, encomium and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
polymathy Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 39
polyphemus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 217
proem in book Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 159
proem of book, and poetic/homeric unity Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 169
proem of book Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 159
propertius, in vergil Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
pythagoras, pythagoreanism Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 39
quintus Verhelst and Scheijnens, Greek and Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity: Form, Tradition, and Context (2022) 66
rome, martial dimensions of Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 117
rome, multifaceted literary tradition of Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 117
romulus Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 117
sappho Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 216; Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 58
sceptre, hesiods Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 64
seal/sphragis Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 119, 120
sheep Greensmith, The Resurrection of Homer in Imperial Greek Epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica and the Poetics of Impersonation (2021) 159; Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 28; Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 34, 35; Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 117
sibyl Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209
sibylline oracles Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 209
simichidas Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 214, 216, 217; Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 541
snell, b. Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 58
socrates Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 217; Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 541
song Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
songs and music, construction of authority Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
songs and music, hymns Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
songs and music Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87, 160
space, bucolic Kyriakou Sistakou and Rengakos, Brill's Companion to Theocritus (2014) 457
storms Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 27
styx Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 295, 308
tartarus Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 294, 295, 308
theagenes of rhegion Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 160
theocritus, poet Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 214, 216, 217
thespiai Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 28
thucydides Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 49
thunder Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 27
thyrsis Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 214
timeliness Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 87
titans Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 39; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 66
tradition Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 58
transgression Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 308
trojan war, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 87
trojan war Marincola et al., Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Calum Maciver, Greek Notions of the Past in the Archaic and Classical Eras: History Without Historians (2021) 49
troy Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 87
typhoeus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
utopia Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 214, 216, 217
valley of the muses Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 28
vergil, aeneid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
vergil, as author of aeneid Nelsestuen, Varro the Agronomist: Political Philosophy, Satire, and Agriculture in the Late Republic (2015) 117
vergil, gigantomachy as deployed by Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
versnel, hendrik s. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
voices, callimachus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 455
water (element) Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 295, 308
west, m. Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 65
wisdom literature Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 87, 119
wood-cutting Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 27
zeus Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 66, 214; Konig, The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture (2022) 27, 28
zeus (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 160