Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6474
Hesiod, Theogony, 203-212


ταύτην δʼ ἐξ ἀρχῆς τιμὴν ἔχει ἠδὲ λέλογχεBright-gleaming armour, and long spears they bore


μοῖραν ἐν ἀνθρώποισι καὶ ἀθανάτοισι θεοῖσιAnd the Nymphs, called Meliae by everyone;


παρθενίους τʼ ὀάρους μειδήματά τʼ ἐξαπάτας τεAnd when the flinty sickle’s work was done


τέρψιν τε γλυκερὴν φιλότητά τε μειλιχίην τε.Then Cronus cast into the surging sea


τοὺς δὲ πατὴρ Τιτῆνας ἐπίκλησιν καλέεσκεHis father’s genitals which were to be


παῖδας νεικείων μέγας Οὐρανός, οὓς τέκεν αὐτός·Borne long upon the waves, and there was spread
NaN


ἔργον, τοῖο δʼ ἔπειτα τίσιν μετόπισθεν ἔσεσθαι.White foam from the timeless flesh: from it was bred


νὺξ δʼ ἔτεκεν στυγερόν τε Μόρον καὶ Κῆρα μέλαινανA maid: holy Cythera first she neared


καὶ Θάνατον, τέκε δʼ Ὕπνον, ἔτικτε δὲ φῦλον Ὀνείρων·Then came to sea-girt Cyprus. A revered


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 101-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-139, 14, 140-149, 15, 150-159, 16, 160-169, 17, 170-179, 18, 180-189, 19, 190-199, 20, 200-209, 21, 210-212, 22-26, 42-100 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

100. Which brought the Death-Gods. Now in misery
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 117-202, 204-236, 243, 245, 251, 254, 262, 265-269, 27, 270-279, 28, 280-375, 380, 383-511, 617-735, 77-79, 820-900, 924-929, 116 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

116. A pleasing song and laud the company
3. Homer, Iliad, 5.370, 14.201, 14.246, 14.302, 18.567-18.572 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5.370. /but fair Aphrodite flung herself upon the knees of her mother Dione. She clasped her daughter in her arms, and stroked her with her hand and spake to her, saying:Who now of the sons of heaven, dear child, hath entreated thee thus wantonly, as though thou wert working some evil before the face of all? 14.201. /For I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed and cherished me in their halls, when they had taken me from Rhea, what time Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, thrust Cronos down to dwell beneath earth and the unresting sea. 14.246. /Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson 14.302. /Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed me and cherished me in their halls. Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife 18.567. /and one single path led thereto, whereby the vintagers went and came, whensoever they gathered the vintage. And maidens and youths in childish glee were bearing the honey-sweet fruit in wicker baskets. And in their midst a boy made pleasant music with a clear-toned lyre 18.568. /and one single path led thereto, whereby the vintagers went and came, whensoever they gathered the vintage. And maidens and youths in childish glee were bearing the honey-sweet fruit in wicker baskets. And in their midst a boy made pleasant music with a clear-toned lyre 18.569. /and one single path led thereto, whereby the vintagers went and came, whensoever they gathered the vintage. And maidens and youths in childish glee were bearing the honey-sweet fruit in wicker baskets. And in their midst a boy made pleasant music with a clear-toned lyre 18.570. /and thereto sang sweetly the Linos-song with his delicate voice; and his fellows beating the earth in unison therewith followed on with bounding feet mid dance and shoutings.And therein he wrought a herd of straight-horned kine: the kine were fashioned of gold and tin 18.571. /and thereto sang sweetly the Linos-song with his delicate voice; and his fellows beating the earth in unison therewith followed on with bounding feet mid dance and shoutings.And therein he wrought a herd of straight-horned kine: the kine were fashioned of gold and tin 18.572. /and thereto sang sweetly the Linos-song with his delicate voice; and his fellows beating the earth in unison therewith followed on with bounding feet mid dance and shoutings.And therein he wrought a herd of straight-horned kine: the kine were fashioned of gold and tin
4. Homeric Hymns, To Aphrodite, 11-13, 218, 5-10 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

10. The work of Ares, conflict, blood and gore.
5. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 35, 27 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

27. And lofty headlands, streams that to the sea
6. Aeschylus, Persians, 50 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

50. ζυγὸν ἀμφιβαλεῖν δούλιον Ἑλλάδι 50. to cast the yoke of slavery upon Hellas—Mardon, Tharybis, anvils of the lance, and the Mysians, hurlers of the javelin. placeName key=
7. Aristophanes, Birds, 970 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

970. ᾐνίξαθ' ὁ Βάκις τοῦτο πρὸς τὸν ἀέρα.
8. Aristophanes, Knights, 1187, 1186 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1186. ἐπισκοπεῖ γὰρ περιφανῶς τὸ ναυτικόν.
9. Euripides, Ion, 196 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Herodotus, Histories, 2.43-2.64 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.43. Concerning Heracles, I heard it said that he was one of the twelve gods. But nowhere in Egypt could I hear anything about the other Heracles, whom the Greeks know. ,I have indeed a lot of other evidence that the name of Heracles did not come from Hellas to Egypt, but from Egypt to Hellas (and in Hellas to those Greeks who gave the name Heracles to the son of Amphitryon), besides this: that Amphitryon and Alcmene, the parents of this Heracles, were both Egyptian by descent ; and that the Egyptians deny knowing the names Poseidon and the Dioscuri, nor are these gods reckoned among the gods of Egypt . ,Yet if they got the name of any deity from the Greeks, of these not least but in particular would they preserve a recollection, if indeed they were already making sea voyages and some Greeks, too, were seafaring men, as I expect and judge; so that the names of these gods would have been even better known to the Egyptians than the name of Heracles. ,But Heracles is a very ancient god in Egypt ; as the Egyptians themselves say, the change of the eight gods to the twelve, one of whom they acknowledge Heracles to be, was made seventeen thousand years before the reign of Amasis. 2.44. Moreover, wishing to get clear information about this matter where it was possible so to do, I took ship for Tyre in Phoenicia, where I had learned by inquiry that there was a holy temple of Heracles. ,There I saw it, richly equipped with many other offerings, besides two pillars, one of refined gold, one of emerald: a great pillar that shone at night; and in conversation with the priests, I asked how long it was since their temple was built. ,I found that their account did not tally with the belief of the Greeks, either; for they said that the temple of the god was founded when Tyre first became a city, and that was two thousand three hundred years ago. At Tyre I saw yet another temple of the so-called Thasian Heracles. ,Then I went to Thasos, too, where I found a temple of Heracles built by the Phoenicians, who made a settlement there when they voyaged in search of Europe ; now they did so as much as five generations before the birth of Heracles the son of Amphitryon in Hellas . ,Therefore, what I have discovered by inquiry plainly shows that Heracles is an ancient god. And furthermore, those Greeks, I think, are most in the right, who have established and practise two worships of Heracles, sacrificing to one Heracles as to an immortal, and calling him the Olympian, but to the other bringing offerings as to a dead hero. 2.45. And the Greeks say many other ill-considered things, too; among them, this is a silly story which they tell about Heracles: that when he came to Egypt, the Egyptians crowned him and led him out in a procession to sacrifice him to Zeus; and for a while (they say) he followed quietly, but when they started in on him at the altar, he resisted and killed them all. ,Now it seems to me that by this story the Greeks show themselves altogether ignorant of the character and customs of the Egyptians; for how should they sacrifice men when they are forbidden to sacrifice even beasts, except swine and bulls and bull-calves, if they are unblemished, and geese? ,And furthermore, as Heracles was alone, and, still, only a man, as they say, how is it natural that he should kill many myriads? In talking so much about this, may I keep the goodwill of gods and heroes! 2.46. This is why the Egyptians of whom I have spoken sacrifice no goats, male or female: the Mendesians reckon Pan among the eight gods who, they say, were before the twelve gods. ,Now in their painting and sculpture, the image of Pan is made with the head and the legs of a goat, as among the Greeks; not that he is thought to be in fact such, or unlike other gods; but why they represent him so, I have no wish to say. ,The Mendesians consider all goats sacred, the male even more than the female, and goatherds are held in special estimation: one he-goat is most sacred of all; when he dies, it is ordained that there should be great mourning in all the Mendesian district. ,In the Egyptian language Mendes is the name both for the he-goat and for Pan. In my lifetime a strange thing occurred in this district: a he-goat had intercourse openly with a woman. This came to be publicly known. 2.47. Swine are held by the Egyptians to be unclean beasts. In the first place, if an Egyptian touches a hog in passing, he goes to the river and dips himself in it, clothed as he is; and in the second place, swineherds, though native born Egyptians, are alone of all men forbidden to enter any Egyptian temple; nor will any give a swineherd his daughter in marriage, nor take a wife from their women; but swineherds intermarry among themselves. ,Nor do the Egyptians think it right to sacrifice swine to any god except the Moon and Dionysus; to these, they sacrifice their swine at the same time, in the same season of full moon; then they eat the meat. The Egyptians have an explanation of why they sacrifice swine at this festival, yet abominate them at others; I know it, but it is not fitting that I relate it. ,But this is how they sacrifice swine to the Moon: the sacrificer lays the end of the tail and the spleen and the caul together and covers them up with all the fat that he finds around the belly, then consigns it all to the fire; as for the rest of the flesh, they eat it at the time of full moon when they sacrifice the victim; but they will not taste it on any other day. Poor men, with but slender means, mold swine out of dough, which they then take and sacrifice. 2.48. To Dionysus, on the evening of his festival, everyone offers a piglet which he kills before his door and then gives to the swineherd who has sold it, for him to take away. ,The rest of the festival of Dionysus is observed by the Egyptians much as it is by the Greeks, except for the dances; but in place of the phallus, they have invented the use of puppets two feet high moved by strings, the male member nodding and nearly as big as the rest of the body, which are carried about the villages by women; a flute-player goes ahead, the women follow behind singing of Dionysus. ,Why the male member is so large and is the only part of the body that moves, there is a sacred legend that explains. 2.49. Now then, it seems to me that Melampus son of Amytheon was not ignorant of but was familiar with this sacrifice. For Melampus was the one who taught the Greeks the name of Dionysus and the way of sacrificing to him and the phallic procession; he did not exactly unveil the subject taking all its details into consideration, for the teachers who came after him made a fuller revelation; but it was from him that the Greeks learned to bear the phallus along in honor of Dionysus, and they got their present practice from his teaching. ,I say, then, that Melampus acquired the prophetic art, being a discerning man, and that, besides many other things which he learned from Egypt, he also taught the Greeks things concerning Dionysus, altering few of them; for I will not say that what is done in Egypt in connection with the god and what is done among the Greeks originated independently: for they would then be of an Hellenic character and not recently introduced. ,Nor again will I say that the Egyptians took either this or any other custom from the Greeks. But I believe that Melampus learned the worship of Dionysus chiefly from Cadmus of Tyre and those who came with Cadmus from Phoenicia to the land now called Boeotia . 2.50. In fact, the names of nearly all the gods came to Hellas from Egypt . For I am convinced by inquiry that they have come from foreign parts, and I believe that they came chiefly from Egypt . ,Except the names of Poseidon and the Dioscuri, as I have already said, and Hera, and Hestia, and Themis, and the Graces, and the Nereids, the names of all the gods have always existed in Egypt . I only say what the Egyptians themselves say. The gods whose names they say they do not know were, as I think, named by the Pelasgians, except Poseidon, the knowledge of whom they learned from the Libyans. ,Alone of all nations the Libyans have had among them the name of Poseidon from the beginning, and they have always honored this god. The Egyptians, however, are not accustomed to pay any honors to heroes. 2.51. These customs, then, and others besides, which I shall indicate, were taken by the Greeks from the Egyptians. It was not so with the ithyphallic images of Hermes; the production of these came from the Pelasgians, from whom the Athenians were the first Greeks to take it, and then handed it on to others. ,For the Athenians were then already counted as Greeks when the Pelasgians came to live in the land with them and thereby began to be considered as Greeks. Whoever has been initiated into the rites of the Cabeiri, which the Samothracians learned from the Pelasgians and now practice, understands what my meaning is. ,Samothrace was formerly inhabited by those Pelasgians who came to live among the Athenians, and it is from them that the Samothracians take their rites. ,The Athenians, then, were the first Greeks to make ithyphallic images of Hermes, and they did this because the Pelasgians taught them. The Pelasgians told a certain sacred tale about this, which is set forth in the Samothracian mysteries. 2.52. Formerly, in all their sacrifices, the Pelasgians called upon gods without giving name or appellation to any (I know this, because I was told at Dodona ); for as yet they had not heard of such. They called them gods from the fact that, besides setting everything in order, they maintained all the dispositions. ,Then, after a long while, first they learned the names of the rest of the gods, which came to them from Egypt, and, much later, the name of Dionysus; and presently they asked the oracle at Dodona about the names; for this place of divination, held to be the most ancient in Hellas, was at that time the only one. ,When the Pelasgians, then, asked at Dodona whether they should adopt the names that had come from foreign parts, the oracle told them to use the names. From that time onwards they used the names of the gods in their sacrifices; and the Greeks received these later from the Pelasgians. 2.53. But whence each of the gods came to be, or whether all had always been, and how they appeared in form, they did not know until yesterday or the day before, so to speak; ,for I suppose Hesiod and Homer flourished not more than four hundred years earlier than I; and these are the ones who taught the Greeks the descent of the gods, and gave the gods their names, and determined their spheres and functions, and described their outward forms. ,But the poets who are said to have been earlier than these men were, in my opinion, later. The earlier part of all this is what the priestesses of Dodona tell; the later, that which concerns Hesiod and Homer, is what I myself say. 2.54. But about the oracles in Hellas, and that one which is in Libya, the Egyptians give the following account. The priests of Zeus of Thebes told me that two priestesses had been carried away from Thebes by Phoenicians; one, they said they had heard was taken away and sold in Libya, the other in Hellas ; these women, they said, were the first founders of places of divination in the aforesaid countries. ,When I asked them how it was that they could speak with such certain knowledge, they said in reply that their people had sought diligently for these women, and had never been able to find them, but had learned later the story which they were telling me. 2.55. That, then, I heard from the Theban priests; and what follows, the prophetesses of Dodona say: that two black doves had come flying from Thebes in Egypt, one to Libya and one to Dodona ; ,the latter settled on an oak tree, and there uttered human speech, declaring that a place of divination from Zeus must be made there; the people of Dodona understood that the message was divine, and therefore established the oracular shrine. ,The dove which came to Libya told the Libyans (they say) to make an oracle of Ammon; this also is sacred to Zeus. Such was the story told by the Dodonaean priestesses, the eldest of whom was Promeneia and the next Timarete and the youngest Nicandra; and the rest of the servants of the temple at Dodona similarly held it true. 2.56. But my own belief about it is this. If the Phoenicians did in fact carry away the sacred women and sell one in Libya and one in Hellas, then, in my opinion, the place where this woman was sold in what is now Hellas, but was formerly called Pelasgia, was Thesprotia ; ,and then, being a slave there, she established a shrine of Zeus under an oak that was growing there; for it was reasonable that, as she had been a handmaid of the temple of Zeus at Thebes , she would remember that temple in the land to which she had come. ,After this, as soon as she understood the Greek language, she taught divination; and she said that her sister had been sold in Libya by the same Phoenicians who sold her. 2.57. I expect that these women were called “doves” by the people of Dodona because they spoke a strange language, and the people thought it like the cries of birds; ,then the woman spoke what they could understand, and that is why they say that the dove uttered human speech; as long as she spoke in a foreign tongue, they thought her voice was like the voice of a bird. For how could a dove utter the speech of men? The tale that the dove was black signifies that the woman was Egyptian . ,The fashions of divination at Thebes of Egypt and at Dodona are like one another; moreover, the practice of divining from the sacrificed victim has also come from Egypt . 2.58. It would seem, too, that the Egyptians were the first people to establish solemn assemblies, and processions, and services; the Greeks learned all that from them. I consider this proved, because the Egyptian ceremonies are manifestly very ancient, and the Greek are of recent origin. 2.59. The Egyptians hold solemn assemblies not once a year, but often. The principal one of these and the most enthusiastically celebrated is that in honor of Artemis at the town of Bubastis , and the next is that in honor of Isis at Busiris. ,This town is in the middle of the Egyptian Delta, and there is in it a very great temple of Isis, who is Demeter in the Greek language. ,The third greatest festival is at Saïs in honor of Athena; the fourth is the festival of the sun at Heliopolis, the fifth of Leto at Buto, and the sixth of Ares at Papremis. 2.60. When the people are on their way to Bubastis, they go by river, a great number in every boat, men and women together. Some of the women make a noise with rattles, others play flutes all the way, while the rest of the women, and the men, sing and clap their hands. ,As they travel by river to Bubastis, whenever they come near any other town they bring their boat near the bank; then some of the women do as I have said, while some shout mockery of the women of the town; others dance, and others stand up and lift their skirts. They do this whenever they come alongside any riverside town. ,But when they have reached Bubastis, they make a festival with great sacrifices, and more wine is drunk at this feast than in the whole year besides. It is customary for men and women (but not children) to assemble there to the number of seven hundred thousand, as the people of the place say. 2.61. This is what they do there; I have already described how they keep the feast of Isis at Busiris. There, after the sacrifice, all the men and women lament, in countless numbers; but it is not pious for me to say who it is for whom they lament. ,Carians who live in Egypt do even more than this, inasmuch as they cut their foreheads with knives; and by this they show that they are foreigners and not Egyptians. 2.62. When they assemble at Saïs on the night of the sacrifice, they keep lamps burning outside around their houses. These lamps are saucers full of salt and oil on which the wick floats, and they burn all night. This is called the Feast of Lamps. ,Egyptians who do not come to this are mindful on the night of sacrifice to keep their own lamps burning, and so they are alight not only at Saïs but throughout Egypt . A sacred tale is told showing why this night is lit up thus and honored. 2.63. When the people go to Heliopolis and Buto, they offer sacrifice only. At Papremis sacrifice is offered and rites performed just as elsewhere; but when the sun is setting, a few of the priests hover about the image, while most of them go and stand in the entrance to the temple with clubs of wood in their hands; others, more than a thousand men fulfilling vows, who also carry wooden clubs, stand in a mass opposite. ,The image of the god, in a little gilded wooden shrine, they carry away on the day before this to another sacred building. The few who are left with the image draw a four-wheeled wagon conveying the shrine and the image that is in the shrine; the others stand in the space before the doors and do not let them enter, while the vow-keepers, taking the side of the god, strike them, who defend themselves. ,A fierce fight with clubs breaks out there, and they are hit on their heads, and many, I expect, even die from their wounds; although the Egyptians said that nobody dies. ,The natives say that they made this assembly a custom from the following incident: the mother of Ares lived in this temple; Ares had been raised apart from her and came, when he grew up, wishing to visit his mother; but as her attendants kept him out and would not let him pass, never having seen him before, Ares brought men from another town, manhandled the attendants, and went in to his mother. From this, they say, this hitting for Ares became a custom in the festival. 2.64. Furthermore, it was the Egyptians who first made it a matter of religious observance not to have intercourse with women in temples or to enter a temple after such intercourse without washing. Nearly all other peoples are less careful in this matter than are the Egyptians and Greeks, and consider a man to be like any other animal; ,for beasts and birds (they say) are seen to mate both in the temples and in the sacred precincts; now were this displeasing to the god, the beasts would not do so. This is the reason given by others for practices which I, for my part, dislike;
11. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

527a. and he grips you and drags you up, you will gape and feel dizzy there no less than I do here, and some one perhaps will give you, yes, a degrading box on the ear, and will treat you with every kind of contumely.
12. Philochorus, Fragments, None (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

13. Arrian, Anabasis of Alexander, 2.3.3 (1st cent. CE

2.3.3. καί ποτε ἀροῦντος αὐτοῦ ἐπιστῆναι ἐπὶ τὸν ζυγὸν ἀετὸν καὶ ἐπιμεῖναι ἔστε ἐπὶ βουλυτὸν καθήμενον· τὸν δὲ ἐκπλαγέντα τῇ ὄψει ἰέναι κοινώσοντα ὑπὲρ τοῦ θείου παρὰ τοὺς Τελμισσέας τοὺς μάντεις· εἶναι γὰρ τοὺς Τελμισσέας σοφοὺς τὰ θεῖα ἐξηγεῖσθαι καὶ σφισιν ἀπὸ γένους δεδόσθαι αὐτοῖς καὶ γυναιξὶν καὶ παισὶ τὴν μαντείαν.
14. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 36.17 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adonis, adonia de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 242
aeschylus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
alyattes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
aphrodite, birth of Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
aphrodite Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 75; Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241; Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 169; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 242
aphrodite (goddess, aka mylitta, ailat, mitra) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
apollo, cult of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
apollo, in myth Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
apollo, in non-greek contexts Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
apollo Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
apollo (god), depiction/imagery of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
aristophanes, knights Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
arrian Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
artemis Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
athena Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
athena parthenos, pheidias, iconography Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
athens, pandora cult Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
athens, politicisation of myth Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
audience de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 156
bacis Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
belief, visual imagery as evidence Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
bios/βίος Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
catalogue of women (hesiod) Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 200
chaos Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 169
chorus / choral lyric de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 242
clay, jenny straus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
cosmic (force) Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 75
cosmogony Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 371
cosmos/kosmos Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
courage de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 156
cyrus the great Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
demeter Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
demiurge Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 75
dikê/δίκη Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
dione (goddess) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
drama, tragedy Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
eagle Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
earth/earth/gaea Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
earth Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 75; Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 166
elis Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
emotions, anger/rage de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153, 156
emotions, desire de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 156
emotions, fear (fright) de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 156
emotions, grief de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 156
emotions, hate/hatred de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 156
emotions, joy de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 156
emotions, love/passion de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153, 156
empedocles Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 75
epic narrative, authority of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
eris/eris/strife/strife Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
eros Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 169
eros (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
etymology Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
ge (gaea/gaia, goddess) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 371
god/goddess Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 75
gods, lists of Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 200
gods, vegetation g. de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 242
gods and goddesses, depiction/imagery of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
gods and goddesses, origins Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 371
gods and goddesses, pantheon Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 371
gordian knot Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
gordius Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
hands Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 75
harbours of cypris Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 75
hawk Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
helen Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
helicon Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
hephaistos (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 371
herakles (god/mythological hero), kraterophron (cult epithet) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
herodotos, histories Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 371
hesiod, pheidian circle and Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
hesiod, theogony Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86, 371
hesiod Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86, 371; Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 200; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153, 156
homer, iliad Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86, 371; Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 200
homer, odyssey Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 371
homer Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 200
homeric hymn, to apollo Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
homeric hymns, apollo Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 371
immortality de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 242
invisibility/invisible Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 75
iolaus Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 166
lesbos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 242
leto, in lycia Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
leto Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
leumann, m. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
light de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 242
linus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 242
lloyd, geoffrey Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 166
love Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 75
lycia and lycians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
lykomids de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 242
lópez-ruiz, carolina Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 371
marathon, battle of Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
melanippe Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 166
midas, and the gordian knot Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
midas Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
miletus and milesians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
mnemosyne (goddess) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
mother of the gods, and leto Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
mother of the gods, and warfare Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
mother of the gods, as demeter Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
mother of the gods, as mother of midas Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
mother of the gods, as phrygian matar Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
mother of the gods, multiple identities of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
musaios (poet) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
muses (goddesses) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
myth/mythology, origin of the gods Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 371
myth/mythology, transmission Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
narratology, affective/cognitive de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153
numbers Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 200
oikoumene, and kingship Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
oikoumene Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
olympia, temple of zeus at, base Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
opposites (pair of) Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
oracles Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
orphic theogony Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 166
orphic tradition Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 371
ouranos Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 75
ouranos (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
pamphos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 242
pandora Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241; Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
paris, judgement of Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 166
pausanias Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86; Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
peloponnesian war Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
penia Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 169
persian wars Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
phrygia and phrygians, dominion of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
plato, symposium Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
poetic language, religious role of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
poetic language Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
poetry/poetic performance, homeric hymn to apollo Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
politicisation of myth Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
power Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 75
prometheus de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153, 156
punishment de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 156
real world\n, (of) names Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 200
real world\n, (of/on/generating new) lists Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 200
revenge de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 156
rhamnous, iconography Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
sky Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 166
song de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 242
songs and music, hymns Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
songs and music, musical contest (mousikos agon) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
songs and music Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86
soul Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 75
statue bases of pheidian circle, iconography Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
statue bases of pheidian circle Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
strife Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 75
sun de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 242
theognony Edmunds, Greek Myth (2021) 166
theogony' Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 371
titans Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 241
trojan war Rutter and Sparkes, Word and Image in Ancient Greece (2012) 62
tyranny, and victory and conquest Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
tyranny, metaphysics of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
tyranny, theology of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
west, martin l. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 371
xenophanes Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 75
zeus, and apollo Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
zeus, and kingship Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 190
zeus Schultz and Wilberding, Women and the Female in Neoplatonism (2022) 169; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 153, 156
zeus (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 86