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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6474
Hesiod, Theogony, 114-116


ταῦτά μοι ἔσπετε Μοῦσαι, Ὀλύμπια δώματʼ ἔχουσαιSuch is the precious gift of each goddess.


ἐξ ἀρχῆς, καὶ εἴπαθʼ, ὅ τι πρῶτον γένετʼ αὐτῶν.Hail, Zeus’s progeny, and give to me


ἦ τοι μὲν πρώτιστα Χάος γένετʼ, αὐτὰρ ἔπειταA pleasing song and laud the company


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 10, 2-9, 1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1. Pierian Muses, with your songs of praise
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 10, 100-109, 11, 110-113, 115-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-137, 14-15, 157-159, 16-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-43, 434, 44-45, 459, 46, 460-462, 47-48, 482-483, 49, 5, 50-59, 6, 60-69, 7, 70-79, 8, 80-89, 899, 9, 90-99, 1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1. From the Heliconian Muses let me sing:
3. Homer, Iliad, 2.284, 2.484-2.492, 2.548, 3.103, 3.274, 4.26, 14.256-14.261, 15.36, 19.258 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.284. /in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king 2.484. /Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— 2.485. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.486. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.487. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.488. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.489. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.490. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.491. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.492. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.548. /And with him there followed forty black ships. 3.103. /because of my quarrel and Alexander's beginning thereof. And for whichsoever of us twain death and fate are appointed, let him lie dead; but be ye others parted with all speed. Bring ye two lambs, a white ram and a black ewe, for Earth and Sun, and for Zeus we will bring another; 3.274. /and poured water over the hands of the kings. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut hair from off the heads of the lambs; and the heralds portioned it out to the chieftans of the Trojans and Achaeans. 4.26. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said! How art thou minded to render my labour vain and of none effect, and the sweat that I sweated in my toil,—aye, and my horses twain waxed weary with my summoning the host for the bane of Priam and his sons? Do thou as thou wilt; but be sure we other gods assent not all thereto. 14.260. /To her I came in my flight, and besought her, and Zeus refrained him, albeit he was wroth, for he had awe lest he do aught displeasing to swift Night. And now again thou biddest me fulfill this other task, that may nowise be done. To him then spake again ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Sleep, wherefore ponderest thou of these things in thine heart? 14.261. /To her I came in my flight, and besought her, and Zeus refrained him, albeit he was wroth, for he had awe lest he do aught displeasing to swift Night. And now again thou biddest me fulfill this other task, that may nowise be done. To him then spake again ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Sleep, wherefore ponderest thou of these things in thine heart? 15.36. /and she spake and addressed him with winged words:Hereto now be Earth my witness and the broad Heaven above, and the down-flowing water of Styx, which is the greatest and most dread oath for the blessed gods, and thine own sacred head, and the couch of us twain, couch of our wedded love 19.258. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth
4. Homer, Odyssey, 5.392, 11.302-11.303, 11.575, 12.169 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 157-164, 156 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

156. You walked on craggy Cynthus or abroad
6. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 11-19, 5-6, 69, 7, 70-77, 8-10 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. ὑμᾶς δὲ χρὴ νῦν, καὶ τὸν ἐλλείποντʼ ἔτι 10. But now you—both he who is still short of his youthful prime, and he who, though past his prime, still strengthens the abundant growth of his body, and every man still in his prime, as is fitting—you must aid the State and
7. Euripides, Orestes, 1495 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1495. passing right through the house, O Zeus and Earth and light and night! whether by magic spells or wizards’ arts or heavenly theft.
8. Herodotus, Histories, 8.55 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8.55. I will tell why I have mentioned this. In that acropolis is a shrine of Erechtheus, called the “Earthborn,” and in the shrine are an olive tree and a pool of salt water. The story among the Athenians is that they were set there by Poseidon and Athena as tokens when they contended for the land. It happened that the olive tree was burnt by the barbarians with the rest of the sacred precinct, but on the day after its burning, when the Athenians ordered by the king to sacrifice went up to the sacred precinct, they saw a shoot of about a cubit's length sprung from the stump, and they reported this.
9. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

38c. the copy, on the other hand, is through all time, continually having existed, existing, and being about to exist. Wherefore, as a consequence of this reasoning and design on the part of God, with a view to the generation of Time, the sun and moon and five other stars, which bear the appellation of planets, came into existence for the determining and preserving of the numbers of Time. And when God had made the bodies of each of them He placed them in the orbits along which the revolution of the Other was moving, seven orbits for the seven bodies..
10. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.2.6, 1.14.3, 1.35.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.14.3. Some extant verses of Musaeus, if indeed they are to be included among his works, say that Triptolemus was the son of Oceanus and Earth; while those ascribed to Orpheus (though in my opinion the received authorship is again incorrect) say that Eubuleus and Triptolemus were sons of Dysaules, and that because they gave Demeter information about her daughter the sowing of seed was her reward to them. But Choerilus, an Athenian, who wrote a play called Alope, says that Cercyon and Triptolemus were brothers, that their mother was the daughter of Amphictyon, while the father of Triptolemus was Rarus, of Cercyon, Poseidon. After I had intended to go further into this story, and to describe the contents of the sanctuary at Athens, called the Eleusinium, I was stayed by a vision in a dream. I shall therefore turn to those things it is lawful to write of to all men. 1.35.8. And when I criticized the account and pointed out to them that Geryon is at Gadeira, where there is, not his tomb, but a tree showing different shapes, the guides of the Lydians related the true story, that the corpse is that of Hyllus, a son of Earth, from whom the river is named. They also said that Heracles from his sojourning with Omphale called his son Hyllus after the river.
11. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 6.26-6.27, 9.45, 9.63-9.64, 9.67-9.68, 10.2 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6.26. And one day when Plato had invited to his house friends coming from Dionysius, Diogenes trampled upon his carpets and said, I trample upon Plato's vainglory. Plato's reply was, How much pride you expose to view, Diogenes, by seeming not to be proud. Others tell us that what Diogenes said was, I trample upon the pride of Plato, who retorted, Yes, Diogenes, with pride of another sort. Sotion, however, in his fourth book makes the Cynic address this remark to Plato himself. Diogenes once asked him for wine, and after that also for some dried figs; and Plato sent him a whole jar full. Then the other said, If some one asks you how many two and two are, will you answer, Twenty? So, it seems, you neither give as you are asked nor answer as you are questioned. Thus he scoffed at him as one who talked without end. 6.27. Being asked where in Greece he saw good men, he replied, Good men nowhere, but good boys at Lacedaemon. When one day he was gravely discoursing and nobody attended to him, he began whistling, and as people clustered about him, he reproached them with coming in all seriousness to hear nonsense, but slowly and contemptuously when the theme was serious. He would say that men strive in digging and kicking to outdo one another, but no one strives to become a good man and true. 9.45. All things happen by virtue of necessity, the vortex being the cause of the creation of all things, and this he calls necessity. The end of action is tranquillity, which is not identical with pleasure, as some by a false interpretation have understood, but a state in which the soul continues calm and strong, undisturbed by any fear or superstition or any other emotion. This he calls well-being and many other names. The qualities of things exist merely by convention; in nature there is nothing but atoms and void space. These, then, are his opinions.of his works Thrasylus has made an ordered catalogue, arranging them in fours, as he also arranged Plato's works. 9.63. He would withdraw from the world and live in solitude, rarely showing himself to his relatives; this he did because he had heard an Indian reproach Anaxarchus, telling him that he would never be able to teach others what is good while he himself danced attendance on kings in their courts. He would maintain the same composure at all times, so that, even if you left him when he was in the middle of a speech, he would finish what he had to say with no audience but himself, although in his youth he had been hasty. often, our informant adds, he would leave his home and, telling no one, would go roaming about with whomsoever he chanced to meet. And once, when Anaxarchus fell into a slough, he passed by without giving him any help, and, while others blamed him, Anaxarchus himself praised his indifference and sang-froid. 9.64. On being discovered once talking to himself, he answered, when asked the reason, that he was training to be good. In debate he was looked down upon by no one, for he could both discourse at length and also sustain a cross-examination, so that even Nausiphanes when a young man was captivated by him: at all events he used to say that we should follow Pyrrho in disposition but himself in doctrine; and he would often remark that Epicurus, greatly admiring Pyrrho's way of life, regularly asked him for information about Pyrrho; and that he was so respected by his native city that they made him high priest, and on his account they voted that all philosophers should be exempt from taxation.Moreover, there were many who emulated his abstention from affairs, so that Timon in his Pytho and in his Silli says: 9.67. They say that, when septic salves and surgical and caustic remedies were applied to a wound he had sustained, he did not so much as frown. Timon also portrays his disposition in the full account which he gives of him to Pytho. Philo of Athens, a friend of his, used to say that he was most fond of Democritus, and then of Homer, admiring him and continually repeating the lineAs leaves on trees, such is the life of man.He also admired Homer because he likened men to wasps, flies, and birds, and would quote these verses as well:Ay, friend, die thou; why thus thy fate deplore?Patroclus too, thy better, is no more,and all the passages which dwell on the unstable purpose, vain pursuits, and childish folly of man. 9.68. Posidonius, too, relates of him a story of this sort. When his fellow-passengers on board a ship were all unnerved by a storm, he kept calm and confident, pointing to a little pig in the ship that went on eating, and telling them that such was the unperturbed state in which the wise man should keep himself. Numenius alone attributes to him positive tenets. He had pupils of repute, in particular one Eurylochus, who fell short of his professions; for they say that he was once so angry that he seized the spit with the meat on it and chased his cook right into the market-place. 10.2. For some time he stayed there and gathered disciples, but returned to Athens in the archonship of Anaxicrates. And for a while, it is said, he prosecuted his studies in common with the other philosophers, but afterwards put forward independent views by the foundation of the school called after him. He says himself that he first came into contact with philosophy at the age of fourteen. Apollodorus the Epicurean, in the first book of his Life of Epicurus, says that he turned to philosophy in disgust at the schoolmasters who could not tell him the meaning of chaos in Hesiod. According to Hermippus, however, he started as a schoolmaster, but on coming across the works of Democritus turned eagerly to philosophy.
12. Anon., Scholia On Argonautika, 1.498

13. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, None

14. Papyri, Derveni Papyrus, 5.6, 7.9, 9.2, 12.5, 16.3-16.6, 18.5, 18.14, 20.2, 23.1-23.3, 26.8



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus, eumenides Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
aeschylus, prometheus bound Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
aetia, books 1 and 2, muses in Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 335
anax Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
aphrodite, as a planet Bartninkas, Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy (2023) 72
apollo (god), depiction/imagery of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
apollo (god), sanctuary at delos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
argentarius, m. Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
ataraxia Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 73
athens and athenians, autochthony of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
audience Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
authority, poetic authority Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
autochthony, athenian Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
autochthony, lydian Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
autochthony Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
auxo Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
belief, visual imagery as evidence Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
bett., r. Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 73
burnyeat, m.f. Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 73
callimachus, and the muses Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 335
calliope Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 335
catalogue Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 109
chaos/χάος Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 67
chaos Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
character, excellence of Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 73
clio Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 335
consistency Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 73
cosmogony Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 144
cosmos/kosmos Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 67, 144
cronus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
cynics Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 73
dance Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
delos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
delphi Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
demeter Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
derveni poem Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
derveni poet Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48, 54
didactic poetry Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 67
diogenes of babylon Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 73
earth Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
earth (gaea) Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
eleusis Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
epic (poetry) Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 144
epicurus, on nature and the self Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 73
erato Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 335
erechtheus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
essence Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
gaia, cosmological functions of Bartninkas, Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy (2023) 72
gaia Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
gods and goddesses, depiction/imagery of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
goodness, good life Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 73
harmony Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
hermes, as a planet Bartninkas, Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy (2023) 72
hesiod, his poetic persona Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 64
hesiod, the muses address' Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 73
hesiod, the muses address Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 64
hesiod, theogony Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
hesiod, works and days Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
hesiod Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48, 54; Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
homer, muses in Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 335
homer Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48; Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 73
homeric hymn, to earth Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
hyllus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
hymn Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 109, 144
hymn to the muses, theogony Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 335
hymn to the muses Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 335
initiates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
initiations Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
inspiration Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 144
kathekon, kenos Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 73
kingship, divine Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
knowledge, acquired in the initiation Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
kudos Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
leto (goddess) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
loraux, nicole Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
miletus and milesians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
mother of the gods, and animals Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
mother of the gods, as earth (gaea) Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
musaeus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
muses, callimachus and Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 335
muses Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48, 54
myth/mythology, transmission Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
nature, of things Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 73
nausiphanes Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 73
night (goddess) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
night (nyx) Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
objectivism, objectivity Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 73
olympus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
orpheus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
orphic myths Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
orphic poems Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
orphic theogonies Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
phaedrus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 335
phanes Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
poetic language, religious role of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
poetry/poetic performance, homeric hymn to apollo Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
polymnia Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 335
profane Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
prometheus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
prophecy, gaias prophecy Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
prophecy and prophets Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
protogonos (orphic god) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
rhapsodies (orphic poem) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
rhea Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
rivers (in theogony) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
song Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
songs and music, construction of authority Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
songs and music, hymns Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
songs and music Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
sophists Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 73
springs (in theogony) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
stoics/stoicism Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 67
swallowing, cronus swallowing of his children Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
swallowing, zeus swallowing of protogonos Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
talthybius Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
timon of phlius Long, From Epicurus to Epictetus Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (2006) 73
triptolemus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
uranus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54; Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 109; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
uranus castration, as first-born (πρωτόγονος) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
uranus phallus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
versnel, hendrik s. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
water (element) Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 67
wisdom (expertise), in theogony Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
zeus, and gaea Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
zeus, and kingship Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48, 54; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 33
zeus as king Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54
αἰδοῖον, as venerable (epithet of protogonos) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 54