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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6474
Hesiod, Theogony, 101


ὑμνήσῃ μάκαράς τε θεούς, οἳ Ὄλυμπον ἔχουσινAnd he stood out among them. Thus were they


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 10, 136, 139-142, 171, 2, 213-247, 3-5, 549, 6-7, 706, 718, 730, 735-736, 8-9, 1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1. Pierian Muses, with your songs of praise
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 10, 100, 102-109, 11, 110-115, 12, 128, 13-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-46, 467-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49, 490-499, 5, 50, 500-509, 51, 510-519, 52, 520-529, 53, 530-539, 54, 540-549, 55, 550-559, 56, 560-569, 57, 570-579, 58, 580-589, 59, 590-599, 6, 60, 600, 61-69, 7, 70-79, 8, 80-89, 9, 90-99, 1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1. From the Heliconian Muses let me sing:
3. Homer, Iliad, 2.284-2.332, 2.484-2.492, 9.185-9.191 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.284. /in the likeness of a herald, bade the host keep silence, that the sons of the Achaeans, both the nearest and the farthest, might hear his words, and lay to heart his counsel. He with good intent addressed their gathering and spake among them:Son of Atreus, now verily are the Achaeans minded to make thee, O king 2.285. /the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women 2.286. /the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women 2.287. /the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women 2.288. /the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women 2.289. /the most despised among all mortal men, nor will they fulfill the promise that they made to thee, while faring hitherward from Argos, the pasture-land of horses, that not until thou hadst sacked well-walled Ilios shouldest thou get thee home. For like little children or widow women 2.290. /do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; 2.291. /do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; 2.292. /do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; 2.293. /do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; 2.294. /do they wail each to the other in longing to return home. Verily there is toil enough to make a man return disheartened. For he that abideth but one single month far from his wife in his benched ship hath vexation of heart, even he whom winter blasts and surging seas keep afar; 2.295. /but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know 2.296. /but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know 2.297. /but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know 2.298. /but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know 2.299. /but for us is the ninth year at its turn, while we abide here; wherefore I count it not shame that the Achaeans have vexation of heart beside their beaked ships; yet even so it is a shameful thing to tarry long, and return empty. Endure, my friends, and abide for a time, that we may know 2.300. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.301. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.302. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.303. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. 2.304. /whether the prophecies of Calchas be true, or no. For this in truth do we know well in our hearts, and ye are all witnesses thereto, even as many as the fates of death have not borne away. It was but as yesterday or the day before, when the ships of the Achaeans were gathering in Aulis, laden with woes for Priam and the Trojans; 2.305. /and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light 2.306. /and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light 2.307. /and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light 2.308. /and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light 2.309. /and we round about a spring were offering to the immortals upon the holy altars hecatombs that bring fulfillment, beneath a fair plane-tree from whence flowed the bright water; then appeared a great portent: a serpent, blood-red on the back, terrible, whom the Olympian himself had sent forth to the light 2.310. /glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously 2.311. /glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously 2.312. /glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously 2.313. /glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously 2.314. /glided from beneath the altar and darted to the plane-tree. Now upon this were the younglings of a sparrow, tender little ones, on the topmost bough, cowering beneath the leaves, eight in all, and the mother that bare them was the ninth, Then the serpent devoured them as they twittered piteously 2.315. /and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.316. /and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.317. /and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.318. /and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.319. /and the mother fluttered around them, wailing for her dear little ones; howbeit he coiled himself and caught her by the wing as she screamed about him. But when he had devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them, the god, who had brought him to the light, made him to be unseen; for the son of crooked-counselling Cronos turned him to stone; 2.320. /and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign 2.321. /and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign 2.322. /and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign 2.323. /and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign 2.324. /and we stood there and marveled at what was wrought. So, when the dread portent brake in upon the hecatombs of the gods, then straightway did Calchas prophesy, and address our gathering, saying: 'Why are ye thus silent, ye long-haired Achaeans? To us hath Zeus the counsellor shewed this great sign 2.325. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.326. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.327. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.328. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.329. /late in coming, late in fulfillment, the fame whereof shall never perish. Even as this serpent devoured the sparrow's little ones and the mother with them—the eight, and the mother that bare them was the ninth—so shall we war there for so many years, but in the tenth shall we take the broad-wayed city.' On this wise spake Calchas 2.330. /and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans 2.331. /and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans 2.332. /and now all this is verily being brought to pass. Nay, come, abide ye all, ye well-greaved Achaeans, even where ye are, until we take the great city of Priam. So spake he, and the Argives shouted aloud, and all round about them the ships echoed wondrously beneath the shouting of the Achaeans 2.484. /Even as a bull among the herd stands forth far the chiefest over all, for that he is pre-eminent among the gathering kine, even such did Zeus make Agamemnon on that day, pre-eminent among many, and chiefest amid warriors.Tell me now, ye Muses that have dwellings on Olympus— 2.485. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.486. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.487. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.488. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.489. /for ye are goddesses and are at hand and know all things, whereas we hear but a rumour and know not anything—who were the captains of the Danaans and their lords. But the common folk I could not tell nor name, nay, not though ten tongues were mine and ten mouths 2.490. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.491. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.492. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 9.185. /And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.186. /And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.187. /And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.188. /And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.189. /And they came to the huts and the ships of the Myrmidons, and found him delighting his soul with a clear-toned lyre, fair and richly wrought, whereon was a bridge of silver; this had he taken from the spoil when he laid waste the city of Eëtion. Therewith was he delighting his soul, and he sang of the glorious deeds of warriors; 9.190. /and Patroclus alone sat over against him in silence, waiting until Aeacus' son should cease from singing. But the twain came forward and goodly Odysseus led the way, and they took their stand before his face; and Achilles leapt up in amazement with the lyre in his hand, and left the seat whereon he sat; 9.191. /and Patroclus alone sat over against him in silence, waiting until Aeacus' son should cease from singing. But the twain came forward and goodly Odysseus led the way, and they took their stand before his face; and Achilles leapt up in amazement with the lyre in his hand, and left the seat whereon he sat;
4. Homer, Odyssey, 1.57, 3.103, 3.271-3.272, 12.40, 12.44, 19.203 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 157-164, 156 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

156. You walked on craggy Cynthus or abroad
6. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 274-275, 381-383, 273 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

273. μέγας γὰρ Ἅιδης ἐστὶν εὔθυνος βροτῶν
7. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 1 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Euripides, Andromache, 1165, 1164 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1164. ἐμνημόνευσε δ', ὥσπερ ἄνθρωπος κακός
9. Theocritus, Idylls, 17 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

10. Anon., Sibylline Oracles, 3.97-3.104, 3.110-3.155 (1st cent. BCE - 5th cent. CE)

3.97. Then all the elements shall be bereft 3.98. of order, when the God who dwells on high 3.99. Shall roll the heaven, even as a scroll is rolled; 3.100. 100 And to the mighty earth and sea shall fall 3.101. The entire multiform sky; and there shall flow 3.102. A tireless cataract of raging fire 3.103. And it shall burn the land, and burn the sea 3.104. And heavenly sky, and night, and day, and melt 3.110. 110 The judgment midway in a mighty age 3.111. Shall come, when all these things shall come to pass. 3.112. O navigable waters and each land 3.113. of the Orient and of the Occident 3.114. Subject shall all things be to him who come 3.115. 115 Into the world again, and therefore he 3.116. Himself became first conscious of his power. 3.117. But when the threatenings of the mighty God 3.118. Are fulfilled, which he threatened mortals once 3.119. When in Assyrian land they built a tower;– 3.120. 120 (And they all spoke one language, and resolved 3.121. To mount aloft into the starry heaven; 3.122. But on the air the Immortal straightway put 3.123. A mighty force; and then winds from above 3.124. Cast down the great tower and stirred mortals up 3.125. 125 To wrangling with each other; therefore men 3.126. Gave to that city the name of Babylon);– 3.127. Now when the tower fell and the tongues of men 3.128. Turned to all sorts of sounds, straightway all earth 3.129. Was filled with men and kingdoms were divided; 3.130. 130 And then the generation tenth appeared 3.131. of mortal men, from the time when the flood 3.132. Came upon earlier men. And Cronos reigned 3.133. And Titan and Iapetus; and men called them 3.134. Best offspring of Gaia and of Uranus 3.135. 135 Giving to them names both of earth and heaven 3.136. Since they were very first of mortal men. 3.137. So there were three divisions of the earth 3.138. According to the allotment of each man 3.139. And each one having his own portion reigned 3.140. 140 And fought not; for a father's oaths were there 3.141. And equal were their portions. But the time 3.142. Complete of old age on the father came 3.143. And he died; and the sons infringing oath 3.144. Stirred up against each other bitter strife 3.145. 145 Which one should have the royal rank and rule 3.146. Over all mortals; and against each other 3.147. Cronos and Titan fought. But Rhea and Gaia 3.148. And Aphrodite fond of crowns, Demeter 3.149. And Hestia and Dione of fair lock 3.150. 150 Brought them to friendship, and together called 3.151. All who were kings, both brothers and near kin 3.152. And others of the same ancestral blood 3.153. And they judged Cronos should reign king of all 3.154. For he was oldest and of noblest form. 3.155. 155 But Titan laid on Cronos mighty oath
11. Horace, Odes, 2.12.11-2.12.12, 3.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.4. he found no one but Vespasian equal to the task, and able to undergo the great burden of so mighty a war, seeing he was growing an old man already in the camp, and from his youth had been exercised in warlike exploits: he was also a man that had long ago pacified the west, and made it subject to the Romans, when it had been put into disorder by the Germans; he had also recovered to them Britain by his arms 3.4. “Thou, O Vespasian, thinkest no more than that thou hast taken Josephus himself captive; but I come to thee as a messenger of greater tidings; for had not I been sent by God to thee, I knew what was the law of the Jews in this case? and how it becomes generals to die. 3.4. its length is also from Meloth to Thella, a village near to Jordan.
12. Ovid, Tristia, 2.69-2.72 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Vergil, Aeneis, 5.592-5.593, 7.37-7.45 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.592. rushed fiercer to the fight, his strength now roused 5.593. by rage, while shame and courage confident 7.37. Then, gazing from the deep, Aeneas saw 7.38. a stretch of groves, whence Tiber 's smiling stream 7.39. its tumbling current rich with yellow sands 7.40. burst seaward forth: around it and above 7.41. hore-haunting birds of varied voice and plume 7.42. flattered the sky with song, and, circling far 7.43. o'er river-bed and grove, took joyful wing. 7.44. Thither to landward now his ships he steered
14. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 1.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 1.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 114.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, shield of, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 73
achilles Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 224, 230
aeneas Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
aeschylus Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 22
agamemnon Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 72
ages, myth of the Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 31
allusion, togigantomachy Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
andromache Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 22
anger Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 230
apollo Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 22; Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 466; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 71
apollo (god), depiction/imagery of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
apollo (god), sanctuary at delos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
argentarius, m. Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
argonautica Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 185
aristophanes Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 115
arma Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
audience, augustus as Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
audience, muses as Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
augustine, of poetry Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 115
augustus, as audience Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
augustus, jupiter linked to Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57, 59
authority, poetic Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 71, 72, 73
bees Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 33
belief, visual imagery as evidence Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
briseis Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 230
callimachus, and presentation of the divine Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 250
callimachus, on kings and kingship Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 185
calliope, gigantomachy and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
calliope, in horace Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
calliope Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
calypso Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 33
ciris (anonymous) Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
commentary Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
dance Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
darkness Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 31
delos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
dikê/δίκη Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 121
diogenes of babylon Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 230
discontinuity, geographical, in aetia, divine action, poets and Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 250
divinities, in work of callimachus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 250
divinities, origins and genealogies of Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 250
emathides, gigantomachy deployed by Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
emathides, subversive use of genre by Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
encomium Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57, 59
epic, gigantomachy as euphemism for Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
epic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
epic (poetry) Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 121
epic poetry Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 33
epicureanism Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 230
epos Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 48, 49
erato Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
eros Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 72, 73
essence Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
father, fatherhood Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 48, 49
food Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 72
gigantomachy, as poetic theme Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57, 59
gigantomachy, as politically charged Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
gigantomachy, athena and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
gigantomachy, emathides and subversion of Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
gigantomachy, in horace Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57, 59
gigantomachy, jupiter and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57, 59
gigantomachy, ovid and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
gods Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 31
gods and goddesses, depiction/imagery of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
hardie, philip Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
harmony Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
hesiod, as callimachus model Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 185
hesiod, the muses address' Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 73
hesiod, the muses address Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 78
hesiod, theogony Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
hesiod, works and days Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87; Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 31
hesiod Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87; Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57, 59; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 71, 72, 73
hinds, stephen Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
homer, gods' "758.0_250@hymn '1 to zeus" Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 250
homer Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 466; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 71
hymn '1 to zeus, and kingship ideology" Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 185
hymn '4 to delos" Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 250
hymn 6 to demeter, kingship ideology Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 185
hymn to the muses, gods Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 250
hymn to the muses, theogony Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 185, 250
hymn to the muses, works and days Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 185
hymns Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 71
hymns (callimachus) Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 250
iapetus Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 172
inspiration Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 466
isidorus, hymns to isis Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 185
jupiter (zeus), augustus linked to Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57, 59
jupiter (zeus), gigantomachy and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57, 59
justice Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 71, 72, 73
kingship ideology Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 185
latium Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
law, greek, early (archaic) Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 85
leaving the city, as a metaliterary metaphor Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 73
leto (goddess) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
logos Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 121
lyric (poetry) Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 121
maecenas Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
makares Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 31
mele (callimachus), apotheosis of arsinoe Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 250
minerva (athena), as tyrannical olympian power Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
minerva (athena), in gigantomachy Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
muses, as audience Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
muses, in hesiod Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
muses, in horace Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
muses, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 71, 72, 73
muses Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 466; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127; Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 31
myth/mythology, transmission Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
myth/mythology Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 31
mythos Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 121
nestor Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 33
night/nighttime, as deity Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 31
night/nighttime, connected with divinity Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 31
noah Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 172
nostoi Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 33
odysseus Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 33; Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 224; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 71, 72
ohara, james Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
panegyric Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 466
past, and present, interaction between Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 250
patrons of the arts Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
peploi Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
perses Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 121
perseus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
petronius Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 33
phemius Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 72
philodemus, on music Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 230
pindar Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 224; Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
plausible lie Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 71, 72, 73
poetic language, religious role of Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
poetic patronage Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 72, 73
poetry, and aristocratic power Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 71, 72, 73
poetry/poetic performance, homeric hymn to apollo Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
poets, encomium and Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
poets, theology Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 250
politics, gigantomachy as politically charged Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 59
pollution Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 31
procedural law Gagarin and Cohen, The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Law (2005) 85
propertius, in vergil Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
rhetoric Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 33; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 71, 72
ruler cult, hellenistic Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 250
sex Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 31
sextus empiricus Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 230
sirens Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 33
song Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 195
songs and music, construction of authority Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
songs and music, hymns Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
songs and music Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
stoicism Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 230
superstition Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 31
theocritus, idyll Hunter, The Measure of Homer: The Ancient Reception of the Iliad (2018) 230
timekeeping Ker and Wessels, The Values of Nighttime in Classical Antiquity: Between Dusk and Dawn (2020) 31
truth poetry Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 185
typhoeus Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
utile and dulce Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 33
vergil, aeneid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 127
vergil, gigantomachy as deployed by Johnson, Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses (2008) 57
versnel, hendrik s. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 87
witches and witchcraft Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 33
zeus, in hymns Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 185
zeus Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 172; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 71, 72, 73