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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6474
Hesiod, Theogony, 1001-1006


Μήδειον τέκε παῖδα, τὸν οὔρεσιν ἔτρεφε ΧείρωνOf gods. Last, Zeus the youthful Hera wed:


Φιλυρίδης· μεγάλου δὲ Διὸς νόος ἐξετελεῖτο.The king of gods and men took her to bed


αὐτὰρ Νηρῆος κοῦραι,· ἁλίοιο γέροντοςWho Eileithyia, Hebe and Ares bore.


ἦ τοι μὲν Φῶκον Ψαμάθη τέκε δῖα θεάωνBut Zeus himself yet brought forth, furthermore


Αἰακοῦ ἐν φιλότητι διὰ χρυσέην ἈφροδίτηνBright-eyed Tritogeneia from his head


Πηλέι δὲ δμηθεῖσα θεὰ Θέτις ἀργυρόπεζαThe queen who stirred up conflict and who led


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Hesiod, Fragments, 151 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Hesiod, Theogony, 1002-1022, 457, 468, 47, 643, 729-814, 838, 886-1000 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1000. The loveliest tots in the whole company
3. Homer, Iliad, 14.313-14.325 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

14.313. /lest haply thou mightest wax wroth with me hereafter, if without a word I depart to the house of deep-flowing Oceanus. 14.314. /lest haply thou mightest wax wroth with me hereafter, if without a word I depart to the house of deep-flowing Oceanus. Then in answer spake to her Zeus, the cloud-gatherer.Hera, thither mayest thou go even hereafter. But for us twain, come, let us take our joy couched together in love; 14.315. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.316. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.317. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.318. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.319. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.320. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.321. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.322. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.323. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.324. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.325. /and Semele bare Dionysus, the joy of mortals; nor of Demeter, the fair-tressed queen; nor of glorious Leto; nay, nor yet of thine own self, as now I love thee, and sweet desire layeth hold of me. Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:
4. Homer, Odyssey, 5.35, 8.279, 12.63, 12.65, 20.201-20.203, 24.518 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5. Homeric Hymns, To Aphrodite, 256-279, 255 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

255. They live, eat heavenly food and lightly tread
6. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 30-46, 29 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

29. Shall I sing of how Leto gave you birth
7. Parmenides, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Euripides, Medea, 481-482, 480 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

480. Yea, and I slew the dragon which guarded the golden fleece, keeping sleepless watch o’er it with many a wreathed coil, and I raised for thee a beacon of deliver arice. Father and home of my free will I left and came with thee to Iolcos, ’neath Pelion’s hills
9. Herodotus, Histories, 7.62 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7.62. The Medes in the army were equipped like the Persians; indeed, that fashion of armor is Median, not Persian. Their commander was Tigranes, an Achaemenid. The Medes were formerly called by everyone Arians, but when the Colchian woman Medea came from Athens to the Arians they changed their name, like the Persians. This is the Medes' own account of themselves. ,The Cissians in the army were equipped like the Persians, but they wore turbans instead of caps. Their commander was Anaphes son of Otanes. The Hyrcanians were armed like the Persians; their leader was Megapanus, who was afterwards the governor of Babylon.
10. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 4.145-4.161 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4.145. τοῖο δʼ ἑλισσομένοιο κατʼ ὄμματα νίσσετο κούρη 4.146. ὕπνον ἀοσσητῆρα, θεῶν ὕπατον, καλέουσα 4.147. ἡδείῃ ἐνοπῇ, θέλξαι τέρας· αὖε δʼ ἄνασσαν 4.148. νυκτιπόλον, χθονίην, εὐαντέα δοῦναι ἐφορμήν. 4.149. εἵπετο δʼ Αἰσονίδης πεφοβημένος, αὐτὰρ ὅγʼ ἤδη 4.150. οἴμῃ θελγόμενος δολιχὴν ἀνελύετʼ ἄκανθαν 4.151. γηγενέος σπείρης, μήκυνε δὲ μυρία κύκλα 4.152. οἷον ὅτε βληχροῖσι κυλινδόμενον πελάγεσσιν 4.153. κῦμα μέλαν κωφόν τε καὶ ἄβρομον· ἀλλὰ καὶ ἔμπης 4.154. ὑψοῦ σμερδαλέην κεφαλὴν μενέαινεν ἀείρας 4.155. ἀμφοτέρους ὀλοῇσι περιπτύξαι γενύεσσιν. 4.156. ἡ δέ μιν ἀρκεύθοιο νέον τετμηότι θαλλῷ 4.157. βάπτουσʼ ἐκ κυκεῶνος ἀκήρατα φάρμακʼ ἀοιδαῖς 4.158. ῥαῖνε κατʼ ὀφθαλμῶν· περί τʼ ἀμφί τε νήριτος ὀδμὴ 4.159. φαρμάκου ὕπνον ἔβαλλε· γένυν δʼ αὐτῇ ἐνὶ χώρῃ 4.160. θῆκεν ἐρεισάμενος· τὰ δʼ ἀπείρονα πολλὸν ὀπίσσω 4.161. κύκλα πολυπρέμνοιο διὲξ ὕλης τετάνυστο.
11. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 7.149-7.158 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Tacitus, Annals, 3.61 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.61.  The Ephesians were the first to appear. "Apollo and Diana," they stated, "were not, as commonly supposed, born at Delos. In Ephesus there was a river Cenchrius, with a grove Ortygia; where Latona, heavy-wombed and supporting herself by an olive-tree which remained to that day, gave birth to the heavenly twins. The grove had been hallowed by divine injunction; and there Apollo himself, after slaying the Cyclopes, had evaded the anger of Jove. Afterwards Father Liber, victor in the war, had pardoned the suppliant Amazons who had seated themselves at the altar. Then the sanctity of the temple had been enhanced, with the permission of Hercules, while he held the crown of Lydia; its privileges had not been diminished under the Persian empire; later, they had been preserved by the Macedonians — last by ourselves.
13. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 8.68-8.120 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.3.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.3.8. On the occasion referred to Medea went to Athens and married Aegeus, but subsequently she was detected plotting against Theseus and fled from Athens also; coming to the land then called Aria she caused its inhabitants to be named after her Medes. The son, whom she brought with her in her flight to the Arii, they say she had by Aegeus, and that his name was Medus. Hellanicus, A writer of the fifth century B.C. however, calls him Polyxenus and says that his father was Jason.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
anthropogony Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 80
aphrodite Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 318; Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 261
approximation to the divine (in homeric and hesiodic poetry) Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 261
argo Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 318
ariadne Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 318
armenia and armenians, foundation legend Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 225
armenus Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 225
birth of zeus Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 46
boreas Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 80
cameron, alan Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 95
catalogue Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 112
catalogue of women (hesiod) Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 219
cheiron Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 80
chest of kypselos Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 318
circe Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 318
claros Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 117
cosmos, cosmogony, cosmography Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 218, 219, 220
creation in greece Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 80
cultural appropriation, egyptians and Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 225
cultural appropriation, greeks and Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 225
dionysus Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 261
divine appellations/attributes\n, (and) order Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 219
enūma eliš Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 218, 219, 220
epic of etana Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 220
epic of gilgameš/gilgamesh Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 218
epos Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 46
father, fatherhood Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 46
fictive founders Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 225
flood Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 80
foundation legends, armenia Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 225
foundation legends Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 225
gender, and colonisation' Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 117
gender Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 94
genealogy Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 93, 94, 95, 218, 219, 220
geography Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 94, 220
gods, lists of Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 218, 219, 220
golden fleece, anddragon Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 318
hesiod Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 93, 94, 95, 218, 219, 220
hippomorphic matings Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 80
historiography Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 218, 220
homer Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 219
hyginus Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 93
hymns Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 220
identity theft, egyptians and Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 225
identity theft, greeks and Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 225
idyia Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 318
jason Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 318
layout Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 94
macedon/macedonia Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 225
macedon (son of osiris) Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 225
medea Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 318; Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 117
memory, mnemonics Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 95
narration Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 218, 219, 220
nereids Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 80
okeanos Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 80
parmenides, and becoming like god Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 261
parmenides, the proem Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 261
phaeacians Albrecht, The Divine Father: Religious and Philosophical Concepts of Divine Parenthood in Antiquity (2014) 46
philyra Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 80
poseidon Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 80
real world\n, (of) divine appellations/attributes Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 218, 219, 220
real world\n, (of) hemitheoi Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 93
real world\n, (of) names Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 93, 94, 95, 218
scythians Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 225
structure Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 93
table of contents Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 94, 95
tartarus Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 112
themis Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 112
theseus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 318
titans Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 80
travelogue Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 220
zephyros Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 80
zeus Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 261