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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



12058
Hesiod, Catalogue Of Women, 9
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Euripides, Ion, 1576-1594, 1575 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1575. Through Hellas shall his fame extend; for his children,—four branches springing from one root,—shall give their names to the land and to the tribes of folk therein that dwell upon the rock I love. Teleona shall be the first; and next in order shall come
2. Herodotus, Histories, 7.94, 8.44 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7.94. The Ionians furnished a hundred ships; their equipment was like the Greek. These Ionians, as long as they were in the Peloponnese, dwelt in what is now called Achaia, and before Danaus and Xuthus came to the Peloponnese, as the Greeks say, they were called Aegialian Pelasgians. They were named Ionians after Ion the son of Xuthus. 8.44. These, then, were the Peloponnesians who took part in the war. From the mainland outside the Peloponnese came the following: the Athenians provided more than all the rest, one hundred and eighty ships. They provided these alone, since the Plataeans did not fight with the Athenians at Salamis for this reason: when the Hellenes departed from Artemisium and were off Chalcis, the Plataeans landed on the opposite shore of Boeotia and attended to the removal of their households. In bringing these to safety they were left behind. ,The Athenians, while the Pelasgians ruled what is now called Hellas, were Pelasgians, bearing the name of Cranai. When Cecrops was their king they were called Cecropidae, and when Erechtheus succeeded to the rule, they changed their name and became Athenians. When, however, Ion son of Xuthus was commander of the Athenian army, they were called after him Ionians.
3. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 7.1.2-7.1.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.1.2. Later on, after the death of Hellen, Xuthus was expelled from Thessaly by the rest of the sons of Hellen, who charged him with having appropriated some of the ancestral property. But he fled to Athens, where he was deemed worthy to wed the daughter of Erechtheus, by whom he had sons, Achaeus and Ion. On the death of Erechtheus Xuthus was appointed judge to decide which of his sons should succeed him. He decided that Cecrops, the eldest of them, should be king, and was accordingly banished from the land by the rest of the sons of Erechtheus. 7.1.3. He reached Aegialus, made his home there, and there died. of his sons, Achaeus with the assistance of allies from Aegialus and Athens returned to Thessaly and recovered the throne of his fathers: Ion, while gathering an army against the Aegialians and Selinus their king, received a message from Selinus, who offered to give him in marriage Helice, his only child, as well as to adopt him as his son and successor. 7.1.4. It so happened that the proposal found favour with Ion, and on the death of Selinus he became king of the Aegialians. He called the city he founded in Aegialus Helice after his wife, and called the inhabitants Ionians after himself. This, however, was not a change of name, but an addition to it, for the folk were named Aegialian Ionians. The original name clung to the land even longer than to the people; for at any rate in the list of the allies of Agamemnon, Homer Hom. Il. 2.575 is content to mention the ancient name of the land: Throughout all Aegialus and about wide Helice. Hom. Il. 2.575 7.1.5. At that time in the reign of Ion the Eleusinians made war on the Athenians, and these having invited Ion to be their leader in the war, he met his death in Attica, his tomb being in the deme of Potamus. The descendants of Ion became rulers of the Ionians, until they themselves as well as the people were expelled by the Achaeans. The Achaeans at that time had themselves been expelled from Lacedaemon and Argos by the Dorians.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
archaic age Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 283
athena Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 108
autochthony, metaphor of the family Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 108
conflict with ion Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 108
dramatic festivals, discursive parameters Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 108
euripides ion, and hellenic genealogy Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 108
euripides ion, dating Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 108
euripides ion, subversive readings of Barbato, The Ideology of Democratic Athens: Institutions, Orators and the Mythical Past (2020) 108
genealogical tradition Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 283
hellenes Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 283
hero, heroism, hero-cult Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 283
heroic age, catalogue of women Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 283
heroic age Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 283
merkelbach, r. Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 283
papyri' Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 283
strabo Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 283
thucydides Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 283
trojan war, as a foundational myth Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 283
west, m.l. Finkelberg, Homer and Early Greek Epic: Collected Essays (2019) 283