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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6465
Herodotus, Histories, 9.37.4


nanThis, then, is the way in which he escaped the Lacedaemonians and took refuge in Tegea, which at that time was unfriendly to Lacedaemon. After he was healed and had made himself a foot of wood, he declared himself an open enemy of the Lacedaemonians. Yet the enmity which he bore them brought him no good at the last, for they caught him at his divinations in Zacynthus and killed him.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

2 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 9.33.1, 9.37.1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9.33.1. On the second day after they had all been arrayed according to their nations and their battalions, both armies offered sacrifice. It was Tisamenus who sacrificed for the Greeks, for he was with their army as a diviner; he was an Elean by birth, a Clytiad of the Iamid clan, and the Lacedaemonians gave him the freedom of their city. 9.37.1. Mardonius' sacrifices also foretold an unfavorable outcome if he should be zealous to attack first, and good if he should but defend himself. He too used the Greek manner of sacrifice, and Hegesistratus of Elis was his diviner, the most notable of the sons of Tellias. This man had been put in prison and condemned to die by the Spartans for the great harm which he had done them.
2. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 18.22.1-18.22.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

18.22.1.  Now when Perdiccas and King Philip had defeated Ariarathes and delivered his satrapy to Eumenes, they departed from Cappadocia. And having arrived in Pisidia, they determined to lay waste two cities, that of the Larandians and that of the Isaurians; for while Alexander was still alive these cities had put to death Balacrus the son of Nicanor, who had been appointed general and satrap. 18.22.2.  Now the city of the Larandians they took by assault, and after killing the men of fighting age and enslaving the rest of the population, razed it to the ground. The city of the Isaurians, however, was strongly fortified and large and moreover was filled with stout warriors; so when they had besieged it vigorously for two days and had lost many of their own men, they withdrew; 18.22.3.  for the inhabitants, who were well provided with missiles and other things needed for withstanding a siege and were enduring the dreadful ordeal with desperate courage in their hearts, were readily giving their lives to preserve their freedom. 18.22.4.  On the third day, when many had been slain and the walls had few defenders because of the lack of men, the citizens performed a heroic and memorable deed. Seeing that the punishment that hung over them could not be averted, and not having a force that would be adequate to stave the enemy off, they determined not to surrender the city and place their fate in the hands of the enemy, since in that way their punishment combined with outrage was certain; but at night all with one accord, seeking the noble kind of death, shut up their children, wives, and parents in their houses, and set the houses on fire, choosing by means of the fire a common death and burial. 18.22.5.  As the blaze suddenly flared aloft, the Isaurians cast into the fire their goods and everything that could be of use to the victors; Perdiccas and his officers, astounded at what was taking place, stationed their troops about the city and made a strong effort to break into the city on all sides. 18.22.6.  When now the inhabitants defended themselves from the walls and struck down many of the Macedonians, Perdiccas was even more astonished and sought the reason why men who had given their homes and all else to the flames should be so intent upon defending the walls.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antipater Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 325
ariarathes Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 325
cappadocia Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 325
chrêsmologos Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 208
cilicia Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 325
crannon Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 325
craterus Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 325
de sanctis, gaetano Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 325
dillery, john Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 208
divination, and authority Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 208
divination, and patronage Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 208
divination, and war Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 208
eumenes of cardia Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 325
first war of the successors Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 325
hegesistratus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 208
herodotus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 208
isaurians Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 325
lamian war Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 325
larandians Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 325
mania, in warfare' Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 208
mania Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 208
perdiccas Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 325