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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6465
Herodotus, Histories, 5.72.1


nanWhen Cleomenes had sent for and demanded the banishment of Cleisthenes and the Accursed, Cleisthenes himself secretly departed. Afterwards, however, Cleomenes appeared in Athens with no great force. Upon his arrival, he, in order to take away the curse, banished seven hundred Athenian families named for him by Isagoras. Having so done he next attempted to dissolve the Council, entrusting the offices of government to Isagoras' faction.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 5.3, 5.71 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.3. The Thracians are the biggest nation in the world, next to the Indians. If they were under one ruler, or united, they would, in my judgment, be invincible and the strongest nation on earth. Since, however, there is no way or means to bring this about, they are weak. ,The Thracians have many names, each tribe according to its region, but they are very similar in all their customs, save the Getae, the Trausi, and those who dwell above the Crestonaeans. 5.71. How the Accursed at Athens had received their name, I will now relate. There was an Athenian named Cylon, who had been a winner at Olympia. This man put on the air of one who aimed at tyranny, and gathering a company of men of like age, he attempted to seize the citadel. When he could not win it, he took sanctuary by the goddess' statue. ,He and his men were then removed from their position by the presidents of the naval boards, the rulers of Athens at that time. Although they were subject to any penalty save death, they were slain, and their death was attributed to the Alcmaeonidae. All this took place before the time of Pisistratus.
2. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.126.3-1.126.12 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.126.6. Whether the grand festival that was meant was in Attica or elsewhere was a question which he never thought of, and which the oracle did not offer to solve. For the Athenians also have a festival which is called the grand festival of Zeus Meilichios or Gracious, viz. the Diasia. It is celebrated outside the city, and the whole people sacrifice not real victims but a number of bloodless offerings peculiar to the country. However, fancying he had chosen the right time, he made the attempt. 1.126.7. As soon as the Athenians perceived it, they flocked in, one and all, from the country, and sat down, and laid siege to the citadel.
3. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 8.4, 21.3, 31.1 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Plutarch, Solon, 12.1-12.6, 19.1-19.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12.1. Now the Cylonian pollution had for a long time agitated the city, ever since Megacles the archon had persuaded Cylon and his fellow conspirators, who had taken sanctuary in the temple of Athena, to come down and stand their trial. About 636 B.C. Cf. Hdt. 5.71 ; Thuc. 1.126 . They fastened a braided thread to the image of the goddess and kept hold of it, but when they reached the shrine of the Erinyes on their way down, the thread broke of its own accord, upon which Megacles and his fellow-archons rushed to seize them, on the plea that the goddess refused them the rights of suppliants. Those who were outside of sacred precincts were stoned to death, and those who took refuge at the altars were slaughtered there; only those were spared who made supplication to the wives of the archons. 12.2. Therefore the archons were called polluted men and were held in execration. The survivors of the followers of Cylon also recovered strength, and were forever at variance with the descendants of Megacles. At this particular time the quarrel was at its height and the people divided between the two factions. Solon, therefore, being now in high repute, interposed between them, along with the noblest of the Athenians, and by his entreaties and injunctions persuaded the men who were held to be polluted to submit to a trial, and to abide by the decision of three hundred jurors selected from the nobility. 12.3. Myron of Phlya conducted the prosecution, and the family of Megacles was found guilty. Those who were alive were banished, and the bodies of the dead were dug up and cast forth beyond the borders of the country. During these disturbances the Megarians also attacked the Athenians, who lost Nisaea, and were driven out of Salamis once more. The city was also visited with superstitious fears and strange appearances, and the seers declared that their sacrifices indicated pollutions and defilements which demanded expiation. 12.4. Under these circumstances they summoned to their aid from Crete Epimenides of Phaestus, who is reckoned as the seventh Wise Man by some of those who refuse Periander a place in the list. See note on Plut. Sol. 3.5, and cf. Aristot. Const. Ath. 1 . He was reputed to be a man beloved of the gods, and endowed with a mystical and heaven-sent wisdom in religious matters. Therefore the men of his time said that he was the son of a nymph named Balte, and called him a new Cures. The Curetes were Cretan priests of Idaean Zeus, who took their name from the demi-gods to whose care Rhea was said to have committed the infant Zeus. On coming to Athens he made Solon his friend, assisted him in many ways, and paved the way for his legislation. 12.5. For he made the Athenians decorous and careful in their religious services, and milder in their rites of mourning, by attaching certain sacrifices immediately to their funeral ceremonies and by taking away the harsh and barbaric practices in which their women had usually indulged up to that time. Most important of all, by sundry rites of propitiation and purification, and by sacred foundations, he hallowed and consecrated the city, and brought it to be observant of justice and more easily inclined to uimity. It is said that when he had seen Munychia The acropolis of the Peiraeus, stategically commanding not only that peninsula, but also Athens itself. garrisoned by conquerors of Athens and considered it for some time, he remarked to the bystanders that man was indeed blind to the future; 12.6. for if the Athenians only knew what mischiefs the place would bring upon their city, they would devour it with their own teeth. A similar insight into futurity is ascribed to Thales. They say that he gave directions for his burial in an obscure and neglected quarter of the city’s territory, predicting that it would one day be the market-place of Miletus. Well then, Epimenides was vastly admired by the Athenians, who offered him much money and large honors; but he asked for nothing more than a branch of the sacred olive-tree, with which he returned home. 19.1. After he had established the council of the Areiopagus, consisting of those who had been archons year by year (and he himself was a member of this body since he had been archon), he observed that the common people were uneasy and bold in consequence of their release from debt, and therefore established another council besides, consisting of four hundred men, one hundred chosen from each of the four tribes. Cf. Aristot. Const. Ath. 8.4 . These were to deliberate on public matters before the people did, and were not to allow any matter to come before the popular assembly without such previous deliberation. 19.2. Then he made the upper council a general overseer in the state, and guardian of the laws, thinking that the city with its two councils, riding as it were at double anchor, would be less tossed by the surges, and would keep its populace in greater quiet. Now most writers say that the council of the Areiopagus, as I have stated, was established by Solon. And their view seems to be strongly supported by the fact that Draco nowhere makes any mention whatsoever of Areiopagites, but always addresses himself to the ephetai in cases of homicide.
5. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.49, 1.53 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.53. I am not the only man who has aimed at a tyranny in Greece, nor am I, a descendant of Codrus, unfitted for the part. That is, I resume the privileges which the Athenians swore to confer upon Codrus and his family, although later they took them away. In everything else I commit no offence against God or man; but I leave to the Athenians the management of their affairs according to the ordices established by you. And they are better governed than they would be under a democracy; for I allow no one to extend his rights, and though I am tyrant I arrogate to myself no undue share of reputation and honour, but merely such stated privileges as belonged to the kings in former times. Every citizen pays a tithe of his property, not to me but to a fund for defraying the cost of the public sacrifices or any other charges on the State or the expenditure on any war which may come upon us.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acropolis Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
alcmaeonids Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77, 146
archons Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
areopagus, council of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
aristocracy, aristocrats, aristocratic, competition among Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
aristocracy, aristocrats, aristocratic Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64, 77
assembly, athenian (ekklesia) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
athens and athenians, and religious authority Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
athens and athenians, attitudes of, toward asiatics Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
athens and athenians, in persian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
chios Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
citizens, political awareness among Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
citizens Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
citizenship, determined by fellow citizens Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
citizenship Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
civil strife Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
class, lower Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
class Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
cleisthenes Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77, 146
cleomenes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64, 77
commoners Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
constitution, ancestral Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
constitution Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64, 77
council, chian Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
council, council, athenian (boule) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
council, of five hundred Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
council, of four hundred Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
council, spartan (gerousia) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
council Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
cylon Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77, 146
darius i Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
demarch Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
demes (demoi) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77, 146
democracy, ancient and modern, greek versus athenian Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
democracy, ancient and modern, origins of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
demos (damos), as agent of change Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77, 146
demos (damos), empowerment of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64, 77
demos (damos), limitations placed on Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
diogenes laertius Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
earth and water Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
eder, walter Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
egalitarianism Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
equality Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
four-hundred Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
great rhetra Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
heralds, persian Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
herodotus, religious perspective of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
herodotus Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64, 77, 146
hignett, charles Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
hoplites Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
ionian revolt Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
isagoras Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
isegoria Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
isomoiria. see land, redistribution of isonomia (isonomie) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
kings Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
kuhrt, amélie Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
kybebe Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
lycurgus (spartan lawgiver) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
mass, masses Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
meier, christian Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
mermnads Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
methodology Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
metragyrtes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
miletus and milesians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
miltiades Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
mother of the gods, among asiatic greeks Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
mother of the gods, and athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
mother of the gods, and persians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
mother of the gods, as lydian kybebe Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
ober, josiah, vii–viii Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77, 146
oikoumene Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
oligarchy, oligarchs Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64, 77
participation in government, by all citizens Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
participation in government, by the demos Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
participation in government, by thetes Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
peisistratus Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
persia and persians, and lydian symbols Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
plutarch Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
politeia Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64, 77
probouleusis Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
public office, officials, accountability of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64
public office, officials Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
raaflaub, kurt Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
reform Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
revolution Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64, 146
sardis, under persians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
solon Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64, 77
sources, deriving from oral tradition Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
sources, material Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
subhoplites Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
theagenes Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
themistocles Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
timocracy Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77
tyranny, theology of' Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
tyranny, tyrants Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 77, 146
xerxes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 253
zeugitai Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 64