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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



6414
Herodian, History Of The Empire After Marcus, 1.15.9
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Varro, On The Latin Language, 5.46 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 17.17.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

17.17.3.  He visited the tombs of the heroes Achilles, Ajax, and the rest and honoured them with offerings and other appropriate marks of respect, and then proceeded to make an accurate count of his accompanying forces. There were found to be, of infantry, twelve thousand Macedonians, seven thousand allies, and five thousand mercenaries, all of whom were under the command of Parmenion.
3. Livy, History, 39.5.14 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)

4. Ovid, Amores, 3.2.31 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)

5. Propertius, Elegies, 4.2.3-4.2.4 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)

6. Lucan, Pharsalia, 9.961-9.999, 10.14-10.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 34.22, 34.34, 35.133, 36.32 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Plutarch, Alexander The Great, 15.7-15.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Suetonius, Augustus, 18.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Suetonius, Caligula, 52 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Suetonius, Iulius, 13 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 48.43.2, 51.16.5, 57.15.1, 59.17.3, 59.26.10, 68.29-68.30, 7372.22.1-7372.22.3, 7776.7.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

48.43.2.  and sixty-seven praetors one after another were appointed and held office. One person was chosen to be quaestor while still accounted a boy, and did not obtain the standing of a juvenis until the next day; and another, who had been enrolled in the senate, desired to fight as a gladiator. 51.16.5.  After this he viewed the body of Alexander and actually touched it, whereupon, it is said, a piece of the nose was broken off. But he declined to view the remains of the Ptolemies, though the Alexandrians were extremely eager to show them, remarking, "I wished to see a king, not corpses." For this same reason he would not enter the presence of Apis, either, declaring that he was accustomed to worship gods, not cattle. 57.15.1.  These were the events of that year. In the consulship of Statilius Taurus and Lucius Libo, Tiberius forbade any man to wear silk clothing and also forbade anyone to use golden vessels except for sacred ceremonies. 59.17.3.  In building the bridge not merely a passageway was constructed, but also resting-places and lodging-room were built along its course, and these had running water suitable for drinking. When all was ready, he put on the breastplate of Alexander (or so he claimed), and over it a purple silk chlamys, adorned with much gold and many precious stones from India; moreover he girt on a sword, too a shield, and donned a garland of oak leaves. 59.26.10.  The attire, now, that I have described was what he would assume whenever he pretended to be a god; and suitable supplications, prayers, and sacrifices would then be offered to him. At other times he usually appeared in public in silk or in triumphal dress. 68.29. 1.  Then he came to the ocean itself, and when he had learned its nature and had seen a ship sailing to India, he said: "I should certainly have crossed over to the Indi, too, if I were still young." For he began to think about the Indi and was curious about their affairs, and he counted Alexander a lucky man. Yet he would declare that he himself had advanced farther than Alexander, and would so write to the senate, although he was unable to preserve even the territory that he had subdued.,2.  For this achievement he obtained among other honours the privilege of celebrating a triumph for as many nations as he pleased; for by reason of the large number of the peoples of whom he was constantly writing to them they were unable in some cases to follow him intelligently or even to use the names correctly.,3.  So the people in Rome were preparing for him a triumphal arch besides many other tributes in his own forum and were getting ready to go forth an unusual distance to meet him on his return. But he was destined never to reach Rome again nor to accomplish anything comparable to his previous exploits, and furthermore to lose even those earlier acquisitions.,4.  For during the time that he was sailing down to the ocean and returning from there again all the conquered districts were thrown into turmoil and revolted, and the garrisons placed among the various peoples were either expelled or slain. 68.30. 1.  Trajan learned of this at Babylon; for he had gone there both because of its fame — though he saw nothing but mounds and stones and ruins to justify this — and because of Alexander, to whose spirit he offered sacrifice in the room where he had died. When he learned of the revolt, he sent Lusius and Maximus against the rebels.,2.  The latter was defeated in battle and perished; but Lusius, in addition to many other successes, recovered Nisibis, and besieged and captured Edessa, which he sacked and burned. Seleucia was also captured by Erucius Clarus and Julius Alexander, lieutets, and was burned.,3.  Trajan, fearing that the Parthians, too, might begin a revolt, desired to give them a king of their own. Accordingly, when he came to Ctesiphon, he called together in a great plain all the Romans and likewise all the Parthians that were there at the time; then he mounted a lofty platform, and after describing in grandiloquent language what he had accomplished, he appointed Parthamaspates king over the Parthians and set the diadem upon his head. LXXV  
13. Herodian, History of The Empire After Marcus, 1.7.5, 1.8.6, 1.9.1-1.9.10, 2.13.8-2.13.10, 4.8.1-4.8.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

14. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 5.11.10-5.11.11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.11.10. All the floor in front of the image is paved, not with white, but with black tiles. In a circle round the black stone runs a raised rim of Parian marble, to keep in the olive oil that is poured out. For olive oil is beneficial to the image at Olympia, and it is olive oil that keeps the ivory from being harmed by the marshiness of the Altis. On the Athenian Acropolis the ivory of the image they call the Maiden is benefited, not by olive oil, but by water. For the Acropolis, owing to its great height, is over-dry, so that the image, being made of ivory, needs water or dampness. 5.11.11. When I asked at Epidaurus why they pour neither water nor olive oil on the image of Asclepius, the attendants at the sanctuary informed me that both the image of the god and the throne were built over a cistern.
15. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Commodus, 17.9-17.10 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

16. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Commodus, 17.9-17.10 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
accession (imperial) Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229, 258
achilles Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 233
advisers Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 242
alban mount Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
alexander the great Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 233, 242; Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
ambracia Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
antigonus i monophthalmus Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 233
appearance Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229, 233, 242, 258
athena Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
auctoritas Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
avianius evander,c. Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
balbinus (calvinus) Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229
barbarians Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 233, 242
battle scenes Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229
caesar (julius) Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 233
caligula Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229, 233, 242
caracalla Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 233, 242
cassius dio Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229
characterisation Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 258
claudius marcellus,m.,ciceros portrayal of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
claudius marcellus,m.,his ovatio Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
claudius marcellus,m. Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
cleander Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 258
commodus Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229, 242, 258; Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
conspiracy Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 258
contrasts (in narrative) Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229
curius dentatus,m. Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
death Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 258
demetrius poliorcetes Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 233
diana Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
dionysus Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 233, 242
divine Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 242
dominus et deus,equestrian statue of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
domitian Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229
downfall Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 258
dress Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229, 233, 242
effeminacy Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 242
elagabalus Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 242
evocatio Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
falerii Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
flight Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229
fortune Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229
fulvius flaccus,m. Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
fulvius nobilior,m.,conquers ambracia Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
gladiator Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229, 242, 258
greek,art Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
greek,luxury imports Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
heredity Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 258
homer Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 233
imagines Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
julia maesa Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 242
julius caesar,c.,respects pompeys statues Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
lucilla Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 258
lugdunum (battle at) Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229
luxury,importation of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
macrinus (opellius) Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229, 242
marcia Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 258
marcus aurelius Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 233, 258
maximus (pupienus) Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229
miles,m. Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
minds (of in-text characters) Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229
nero,colossus of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
nero Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229, 233
nobility of birth Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 258
obituary Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 258
objects,restoration of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
octavian Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 233
onlookers Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229, 242
people (as social group) Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229
perennis Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229, 258
phidias,athena parthenus Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
plotting Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 258
politics Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 242
praetorians Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229
propaganda (imperial) Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 242
pyrrhus,war with Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
rapilius serapio,m. Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
readers,expectations Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 258
rome,capitoline hill Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
rome,temple of divus augustus,victoria in Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
rome,temple of mater matuta Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
rome,temple of saturn,cult statue of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
senate Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 242
septimius severus Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229
severus alexander Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 242
soldiers Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 258
space (in narrative) Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229
speech(es) Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 258
statuary,chryselephantine Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
statuary,colossal Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
statuary,equestrian Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
statuary,gilding of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
statuary,painted Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
statuary,preservation of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
statuary,restoration of Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
statues Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 242
tarentum Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
tarquinius priscus Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
theatrical(ity) Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229
timotheus,his diana restored Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298
trajan Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 233
tyranny/tyrants Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229, 258
verres,c.,cicero prosecutes Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
virtues Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 229
volsinii Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
vortumnus Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 36
women' Chrysanthou (2022), Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire. 242
zeus,olympian Rutledge (2012), Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting, 298